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Full text of "Genealogical and personal history of western Pennsylvania;"

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UNIVERSITY 
OF PITTSBURGH 






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LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/genealogicalpers02injord 



GENEALOGICAL 

AND 

PERSONAL HISTORY 

OF 

Western Pennsylvania 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



JOHN W. JORDAN, LL. D. 

Librarian of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Editor of "Penn- 
sylvania Magazine of History and Biography"; author of various historical works. 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



NEW YORK 
LEWIS PIISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 



I915 



I 






WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 529 

• lied young. 8. Lillie A., born February 4, 1833. 9. Rachel, born May 
28, 1835 ; became the wife of Robert S. P. McCall, and now resides in 
Tarentum, honored and esteemed by all who have the honor of her ac- 
quaintance. 



The prosperity of a community depends largely upon its in- 
TREES habitants, who are responsible to a certain extent in its progress 
and development, and among those who have been active fac- 
tors in the development of the town of Brackenridge must be mentioned 
John F. Trees, the genial and popular proprietor of Hotel Trees, the leading 
hostelry of that place. 

(I) Joseph Trees, grandfather of John F. Trees, was a native of 
England, in which country he was reared and received his education, com- 
ing to this country in manhood, and settling in Allegheny county, Penn- 
.sylvania, in 1816. He followed his trade of miller in Westmoreland county, 
near Belmont, earning a lucrative livelihood. His wife, who was a native 
of England, bore him five sons : John, Joseph, Isaac, James, Levi, all of 
whom followed the trades of millwright and miller with the exception of 
James, who was an attorney. 

(H) Levi Trees, son of Joseph Trees, was a native of New Salem, 
Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, died near Saltsburg. Indiana county. 
Pennsylvania. He was a miller by trade and was the proprietor of a flour 
mill at Saltsburg, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, which he operated success- 
fully for many years, deriving therefrom a goodly income. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, as was also his wife and children, and was a 
Democrat in politics. He married Julia Jamison, born in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, March 27, 1829, daughter of Major Samuel S. Jamison, who 
served in the War of 1812, and who was a contractor and drover, con- 
tracting for the first railroad bridge at Saltsburg. one-half mile long, timber 
all hewed from pine trees. He died about the year 1876, aged eighty-two 
years. He and his wife were the parents of six children : John C. de- 
ceased, who was a real estate man of Pittsburgh ; Benton, deceased, who 
was a banker of Philadelphia, and a coal operator; Samuel S., a merchant; 
Evaline, deceased; Julia, aforementioned as the wife of Levi Trees; Mary. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Trees : Samuel, deceased ; Sarah, James, Thomas, 
Lina, John F., Harry, Asa Packer. 

(Ill) John F. Trees, son of Levi Trees, was born in Saltsburg, In- 
diana county, Pennsylvania, September 29. 1866. He attended the public 
schools of Saltsburg until seventeen years of age, thus gaining a thorough 
and practical education, after which he served an apprenticeship at the 
trade of carpenter, which line of work he followed for some time after 
becoming a journeyman, and in 1887 took up his residence in Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in the restaurant business until 1901, 
during which time he acquired a thorough knowledge of that art, and the 
success which attended his efforts prompted him to attempt larger enter- 



530 WESTERN PENNSYLVAxNIA 

jnises, and accordingly he erected a hotel at Brackenridge, which he named 
Jlotel Trees, and of which he has since been the successful proprietor, also 
owner of the building. The extensive patronage accorded him speaks well 
for his excellent management, he devoting his entire attention to looking 
after the comfort and pleasure of his many patrons, who are unanimous 
in their praise of hun as a host. Mr. Trees casts his vote for the candidates 
of the Republican party, but has never aspired to public office, preferring 
to give his undivided attention to his business pursuits. He is a member 
of Tarentum Lodge, No. 644, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of Tarentum. 

Air. Trees married, February 21, 1901, Sarah F. Frampton, of Taren- 
tum, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of one child, Martha E., born 
September 9, 1908. 



Son of parents who were natives of Pennsylvania, VVil- 
RODGERS Ham Adams Rodgers, son of James Rodgers, was born 
near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1816. Upon 
attaining man's estate he was captain of a canal boat on the Ohio river, then 
became connected with the iron and steel manufacturing industry. He 
moved to Parker, Pennsylvania, where his parents are buried, and he became 
manager of a furnace, later accepting a similar position near Canton, Ohio, 
in the employ of Peter Grafif. Soon after the death of Mr. Grafif, he moved 
to Monongahela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania, and for a time 
engaged in coal dealing, later managing several furnaces, one in Paulding 
county, Ohio, another in Latonia, Ohio. One of his business connections 
was with the Rochester Plow Factory, of Rochester, Pennsylvania, of which 
he was president, and in 1862 he moved to Bellevue. Pennsylvania, pur- 
chasing eight acres of land. He became the owner of considerable more 
property in this place, and was a man of prominence, one of the streets 
of Bellevue bearing his name, and there he lived until his death, in De- 
cember, 1872. He was a man well favored by nature with pleasing personal 
attributes, possessing many friends, and by those who knew him only in 
business relations he was rightly adjudged a man of sound and upright 
principle, from which deviation was an unknown thing. He was a Re- 
publican in political faith, and although reared in the Methodist Episcopal 
faith, in later life turned to the Catholic religion. He was prominently 
identified with the Masonic order. 

Mr. Rodgers married Mary Davis, who survived him five years, dying 
in August, 1877. Children of William Adams and Mary (Davis) Rodger'-. 
I. James Alexander, died in infancy. 2. Alexander Hawthorne, died in 
1880, aged thirty-six years. 3. George W., died aged forty-five years. 4. 
Frank J., died in Bellevue, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1914. aged sixty- 
sevv.n years. 5. Robert E.. lives in Bellevue. Pennsylvania, aged sixty-five 
years. 6. Mary, since 1863 has lived in the family home, which she recently 
-sold. 7. William H., died aged twenty-eight years. 8. Thomas C, resides 



WESTERN riCXXSYLVANIA 531 

in Bellevue, Pennsylvania, aged fifty-eight years. <j. Martha C, married 
Thomas P. Fhnn, of VVellsville, Ohio. 



Three generations of tliis branch of tlie JingHsh family 
ENGLISH have resided in the United States, the ancestor, Samuel 
English, coming to Pennsylvania from county Tyrone. Ire- 
land, in 1823, settling first in Philadelphia, later in Allegheny county, where 
his son, John English, and his grandson, y\ndre\v liowers English, have 
succeeded him. The present representative of the family. Andrew Bowers 
English, is one of tiie veteran farmers and veterinary ~urgeon- of .Al- 
legheny county, now living retired at Mars. Pennsylvania. 

(I) Samuel I^iglish married, in Ireland, Elizabeth McLane. and in 
1823 came to the United States, settling in Philadelpliia. loiter he journeyed 
westward, finding a home at Evergreen. Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, 
but moving to Pine township in 1841, there purchasing a farm that he 
cleared and improved and on which he lived until his death at age of 
eighty-seven years. He was a man of means and education, fond of travel. 
and during his life in the United States revisited Europe on three occa- 
sions. On his return from his last journey abroad he landed in Canada 
and for pure pleasure made the trip to Pittsburgh, overland, walking most 
of the way. He did not engage in any business in this country, but man- 
aged his farming and clearing operations as overseer only. Children : 
Alexander, James, Samtuel, Elizabeth, Jane. Mary. John, Andrew, Margaret. 

(II) John English, son of Samuel and El'zabeth (McLane) Engli>h. 
was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, in 1809. He attended school in Ire- 
land until fourteen years of age, then came with his parents to Philadelphia. 
Peimsylvania, there completing his education and learning his trade with 
John Bowers, confectioner and baker. He worked with Mr. Bowers until 
the latter's death in Philadelphia in 1830, then continued in the employ 
of the widow, who succeeded to the business and eventually he married 
Eliza, daughter of his employer, and engaged in business for himself. In 
1841 he moved to Western Pennsylvania, locating in Allegheny City ( Pitts- 
burgh. North Side), where he was one of the first members of the regular 
city police force and held a position in the state penitentiary. In 1848. 
owing to ill health, he was obliged to forsake city life and purchasing fifty 
acres in Pine township, Allegheny county, resided thereon for several years. 
Later he moved to Butler county, where he owned and operated a farm 
of two hundred and twenty-five acres. Later he returned to Allegheny 
county and with his wife passed his last years at the home of his son, 
Andrew Bowers English, who had been left a widower. He enlisted with 
his son. John, in the Union army under President Lincoln's first call for 
"three months"' men. but did not see much active service. He mirried 
Eliza Bowers, of Philadelphia, daughter of John and Rosana ( Bloom) 
Bowers. John Bowers was of prominent German ancestry, a soldier of 
the W^ar of 1812. and was one of the leading confectioners, caterers and 



532 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

bakers of Philadelphia. Rosana (Bloom) Bowers was born in Center 
county, Pennsylvania, of German parentage, and as Mrs. Bowers was very 
prominent in Philadelphia, and during the Jackson campaign she superin- 
tended several great feasts prepared by his adherents. At one of these 
was served an immense bear, as the "piece de resistance," roasted whole, 
another time a bufifalo was furnished to the crowd, and at a third gather- 
ing a large ox was roasted for the entertainment of the enthusiastic demo- 
cracy. John and Rosana (Bloom) Bowers had children: Eliza, married 
John English, John, died young, George, Samuel, Christian, Susanna, John 
(3), Andrew. Children of John and Eliza (Bowers) English: Samuel 
John, served in the Civil War; Andrew Bowers, of further mention; 
Alexander, served four years in the Union army ; Elizabeth McLane, John 
Bowers, Samuel, Hugh Craig, Mary Jane, James Thompson, Margaret 
Logan, Sarah Bell, Matilda Stanton. 

(Ill) Andrew Bowers English, son of John and Eliza (Bowers) Eng- 
lish, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1839. and was brought to 
Pittsburgh North Side (Allegheny City) by his parents, May 4, 1843. He 
could read even at that early age, and for the next four years was in- 
structed in the public schools. He continued his studies in the country 
schools and at an older age read medicine with a local doctor, intending to 
become a physician. In 1862-63-64 he taught in public schools and also 
taught singing schools. At the age of twenty-eight years he established a 
general store at Five Points, near Mars, Pennsylvania, which business three 
years later he sold to his brother, Hugh Craig English. After his marriage 
in 1871 he purchased a farm of seventy-two acres near Mars, on which 
he yet resides. After farming exclusively for a few years, he began prac- 
ticing as a veterinarian, the medical study of former years having been 
supplemented by study and by practice in a small way on his own and neigh- 
bors' stock. He became quite famous locally as a horse and cattle doctor, 
and until quite recently conducted practice in connection with his farming 
operations. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
since his youth, and in political faith is a Republican. He has held several 
public offices in the township, including that of auditor, and although now 
in his seventy-sixth year is well preserved, active and interested in all the 
affairs of life. 

Mr. English married, March 2, 1871, Lizzie, youngest daughter of 
Judge Samuel Marshall. She died June 6, 1888, the mother of five chil- 
dren : Daisy Deane, Walter Barr, Margaret Logan, Eliza Bowers, de- 
ceased, and Hamilton Crawford. After the death of his wife the parents 
of Mr. English returned from Butler county and under the loving care of 
their grandmother the children were reared. They yet reside with their 
honored father, there being but two vacant places in the family circle, 
the mother and daughter, Eliza Bowers English, who died in t888. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVAXJA 533 

The father of George Edward Beck, of this chronicle, John 
BECK Jacob Beck, was a native of Germany, and was there educated. 

Coming to the United States in young manhood, he became a 
carpenter and contractor, afterward speciahzing in the building of furnaces. 
About 1870, in partnership with a Mr. Guinner, he accepted a contract 
for paving the streets of Sharpsburg, wliich was successfully completed, the 
streets of the town being raised about three feet in the course of the opera- 
tion. At one time he was assistant manager of the Isabella Blast Furnace>, 
resigning that position to continue his independent business dealings, aban- 
doning contracting in 1872. Mr. Beck was made a Mason in Allegheny 
City (Pittsburgh North Side), and in Etna was, with J. J. Kyle, the or- 
ganizer of a lodge of that society, the lodge owning at this time chairs 
that he purchased for use in the lodge rooms. In the building of the Smith- 
field Street German Lutheran Church he played an important part, H. J. 
Heinz also contributing generously to the fund thus employed, and Mr. 
Beck and his family were members thereof. He was twice married, his 
first wife Catherine , his second Catherine Miller, both natives of Ger- 
many. Children of the first marriage of John Jacob Beck : Frederick, 
Catherine, Louisa, Gustav, Oscar, Christina, John Jacob, of whom further. 
Children of the second marriage of John Jacob Beck : Charles, George 
Edward, of whom further, Anna, William, Herman, Carrie. 

John Jacob (2) Beck, son of John Jacob (i) and his first wife, Cath- 
erine Beck, was born in Manchester (Allegheny City), Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1864, and was educated in the schools of Sharpsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. In this place he learned the trade of butcher, and was thus em- 
ployed in Sharpsburg for thirty years. He subsequently became a partner 
in the glass business and in December, 1910, succeeded to the offices of 
president and general manager, which he now fills. The company is one 
of firm founding, ably officered, and has had a successful career, Mr. Beck's 
share in its present prosperity one of which he may well be proud. He is 
a Republican in politics, and elected on the ticket of that party to the bor- 
ough council, he served as a member of that body for six years. He affiliates 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and fraternizes with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic Order, in the latter society holding 
the thirty-second degree. 

George Edward Beck, son of John Jacob and his second wife. Cath- 
erine (Miller) Beck, was born in Stewartstown (Etna), Pennsylvania, in 
1869. He was educated in the public schools of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Professor Paulson his instructor. For twelve years he was employed in 
the Spang-Chalfante Mills, and in 1901 purchased his present propertv, 
the Windsor Hotel, of which he is now proprietor, his business a profitable 
and flourishing one. Mr. Beck is a member of the Pittsburgh Automobile 
Club, the Schuley National Club, and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. Politically he is a strong Republican sympathizer, and has been 
active in public afl^airs. He married (first) in 1890. Florence Drummond. 



534 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(second) Barbara Fischer, of Millvale, Pennsylvania. By his first marriage 
he had one child, Levern, deceased, and by his second he has a daughter, 
Catherine, living at home. 



This name Rights is one of the Anglicized forms of the Ger- 
RIGHTS man surname Reitz and prevails quite generally in this branch. 

Lawrence Rights, of Bellevue, Pennsylvania, was a son of 
Simon and Eva (Nirod) Rights, early settlers of Chambersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, where Simon died. His widow moved to Ohio and there died, aged 
nearly one hundred years. Children: Simon, Lawrence, of further men- 
tion ; Adam, deceased ; Mary, Elizabeth. 

Lawrence Rights was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, November 
21, 1840. His early years were spent in Ohio with his mother and there 
he attended public school until his fifteenth year, when he moved to Pitts- 
burgh, making his home with his mother's brother. There he attended the 
Iron City Business College. He learned the tinsmith trade, was for twenty- 
one years foreman for a large Pittsburgh concern, and a well known master 
builder. He was a resident of Bellevue from 1871 until his death in 1899, 
owning a comfortable house at No. 90 Sheraden avenue. He served in 
the Civil War for three months, was a Republican in politics, and for over 
thirty years was a member of Lodge No. 336, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He was a Lutheran in his religious faith. 

Mr. Rights married, October 12, 1871, Martha Coates, born in Al- 
legheny county, Pennsylvania, December 19, 185 1, daughter of Daniel Mat- 
thews and Mary Ann (Boneworth) Coates, her father born in Stafiford- 
shire, England, January 20, 1815, her mother in Germany, November, 1820. 
Daniel M. Coates was a son of John and Ann (Matthews) Coates, of 
Shef^eld, England. John Coates came to the United States in 182 1, his 
wife and family coming in 1824. They settled in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
where John and Anna Coates both died, the former August 15, 1855, ^"d 
the latter January 22. 1863. Daniel Matthews Coates came to Pittsburgh 
when a boy and there li\ed until liis death. May 19, 1880. He was an artist 
of unusual talent. He married, in Trinity Church, Pittsburgh, April i, 
1836, Mary Ann Boneworth, born in Butterdorf, Germany, died January 
4, 1892. Children : John, William, Mary Ann, Anna, Martha, wife of 
Lawrence Rights; Sarah, and a son, deceased. All born in Allegheny, 
Pennsylvania. Children of Lawrence and Martha (Coates) Rights: i. 
Gertrude, died aged four and a half months. 2. Mary Maude, educated in 
private school and Avalon High School ; studied music, and later took a 
course in music at Wooster University, Ohio, and studied harmony under 
Professor Charles M. Boyd ; Miss Rights is now organist of Avalon Trinity 
Lutheran Church, and is a well known, accomplished musician. Mrs. 
Martha (Coates) Rights continues her residence in Bellevue, she and her 
daughter being members of the Limited Presbyterian Church. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 535 

Louis Knell, of Bcllcvuc, i'cniisylvania, is a son of John P. 
KNELL Knell, born in (ierniany, who in i860 came to Pennsylvania, 

settling in Pittsburgh, where he plied his trade of shoemaker. 
He operated his own shop and employed several men in caring for his large 
trade. His home was in Oakmont, where he died in 1911. He married 
(first) Elizabeth Ereedman, born in l^ittsburgh, who bore him three children: 
Louis, of further mention; Elizabeth, Rose, lie married (second; Mary 
McChesney, who bore him six children: John, Aggie, Harry, Anna, de- 
ceased, Ida, George. 

Louis Knell was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 19, 
1865. He was educated in the public schools and spent his earlier years 
in that city. Later he was on a farm in Armstrong county for three years, 
lived in Verona, Pennsylvania, seventeen years, then returned to Allegheny 
county, where he resided until 1898, then moved to Bellevue, Pennsylvania, 
where he has since been continuously engaged as a hardware merchant, his 
residence being at No. 107 South Harrison avenue. He is a Republican in 
politics, a member of Avalon Lodge, No. 657, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Bellevue Chapter, No. 287, Royal Arch Masons; Allegheny Commandery, 
No. 35, Knights Templar; Bellevue Lodge of Heptasophs ; and was a 
charter member of General MtClellan Lodge, No. 150, Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics. Both he and his wife are members of the 
United Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Knell married, in 1891, Anna Hunter, born in Allegheny county. 
Pennsylvania, daughter of John and Mary (Chestman) Hunter, both born 
in England, coming to Pittsburgh in 1850. They are both deceased. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Hunter: Mary, Elizabeth, John, deceased, Anna, 
wife of Louis Knell ; Jennie, deceased, Julia, Laura. Louis and Anna 
Knell have one son. Louis Raymond, born May 31. 1893. 



Germany has contributed to the population of the United 

KAMMERER States to a large extent, her sons being numbered among 

the most patriotic and loyal of our citizens, and John 

Kammerer. of this review, was no exception to the rule, he ever proving 

faithful to the country of his adoption. 

John Kammerer was born in Wurtemberg. Germany, November 17, 
1843. which country was also the birthplace of his parents, who spent their 
entire lives there. John Kammerer left his native land with the idea of 
improving his surroundings, the New World offering opportunities not to 
be found in the Old, and in 1868, the year of his emigration, settled in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where for a number of years he followed his 
trade of shoemaker. Later he removed to Etna, Pennsylvania, where he 
was the successful proprietor of a shoe store, and in 1901 changed his place 
of residence to Brackenridge. where he was the proprietor of a hotel, which 
was largely patronized, it being conducted in a manner satisfactorv to its 
many guests, and he conducted the same until his death, which occurred 



536 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

January 22, 1903. He was the owner of considerable other property in 
Brackenridge, from which he added considerably to his income, and was 
actively interested in community affairs, aiding to the best of his ability in 
all projects for the public good. He was a member of the German Lutheran 
Church, and his political allegiance was given to the Republican party. 

Mr. Kammerer married, in 1868, in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, Mary 
Alf, born in Wurtemberg, Germany, August 27, 1846 daughter of Marcus 
and Theresa (Marger) Alf, who were born, lived and died in Germany. 
Mrs. Kammerer came to the United States in the same ship with her in- 
tended husband, their marriage taking place in the same year, 1868. Nine 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kammerer, namely: i. Frederick, 
deceased. 2. Wilhelm Christian, a resident of St. Louis ; married Mary 
Nady; children: William, Clyde, Gladys. 3. August F., a resident of Etna, 
Pennsylvania ; married Sarah Hartung ; children : Charles, Sarah, Mary, 
Braun, deceased. 4. Minnie C, wife of John Page Dieffenbach, of Milton, 
Pennsylvania ; children : Harold, Elizabeth, Rubie, Catharine. 5. Mary M., 
wife of Alvin B. Kline, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; children: Mary, 
Martha, Jane, Alice. 6. John F., unmarried. 7. Louisa A., died November 
8, 1913; she was the wife of W. A. Gauter; children: Edwin and Gladys. 
8. Lillian O., died January 31, 1914. 9. Elsie D., wife of Wesley L. At- 
kinson, of Brackenridge, Pennsylvania; children: Linn, Eugene, John, 
Blair. The family have always held an honored place in the social life of 
the various communities in which they have resided, and have been active 
factors in every worthy undertaking. 



The late Walter Henry Smith, of Tarentum, where he re- 
SMITH sided for the last nine years of his life, was a man of great 
integrity of character, upright and honorable in all his trans- 
actions, a man who wen and retained the con^J^.^^e and good will of all 
with whom he was brought in contact. He was a native of Leeds, England, 
born January 16, 1845, son of John and Mary (Marshall) Smith. 

John Smith, father of Walter Henry Smith, was born in England, was 
there reared and educated, and subsequently emigrated to the United States, 
settling first in Wheeling, Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1850, when 
he removed to Pittsburgh, South Side, locating on Fourth avenue, where he 
established a dyeing and scouring business, in which he was very successful, 
his patronage steadily increasing year by year, owing to his thorough busi- 
ness methods. He there spent the remainder of his days, his death occur- 
ing May 10, 1889, aged seventy-four years. He attended the Presbyterian 
Church, although he was reared in the faith of the Episcopal Church. His 
wife, Mary (Marshall) Smith, also a native of England, died in Pittsburgh, 
July 12, 1887, aged sixty-six years. They were the parents of six children: 
Walter Henry, of whom further ; Joseph ; Sarah, deceased ; Elizabeth ; Sam- 
uel ; Charles. 

Walter Henry Smith accompanied his parents to this country, residing 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 537 

first in Wheeling and then in Pittsburgh, and his education wa^ acquired 
in the pubHc schools of the latter named city. Upon attaining a suitable 
age he entered his father's employ, gaining a thorough knowledge of the 
business in which he was engaged, and upon the death of his father was 
qualified to continue the business, which he conducted for two more years 
in Pittsburgh, then removed to Tarentum, still continuing the same line of 
work, from which he derived a comfortable livelihood, and remained a resi- 
dent of that city until his death, May 5, 1900, aged fifty-five years. He was 
an active and consistent member of the Presl)yterian Church, and he was a 
staunch upholder of the principles of the Republican party. He was active 
in community affairs in both Pittsburgh and Tarentum, and his influence for 
good was manifest in many directions. 

Mr. Smith married, in 1877, Emma McKnight, born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, June 24, 1845, daughter of David Sterrett and Elizabeth 
(Wageley) McKnight, and they were the parents of four children: i. 
Mary Elizabeth, died in August, 1882, aged twenty-two months. 2. Oliver 
J., a sheet worker, resides at home. 3. Loretta Elizabeth, wife of Harry 
Smith Rishel, an employee of the Tarentum Lumber Company. 4. Lida 
Marie, died June 10, 1890. aged one year, five months, five days. 

James McKnight, paternal grandfather of Emma (McKnight) Smith, 
was a native of Ireland, from which country he emigrated to the United 
States, and became one of the pioneer settlers of Crawford county. Penn- 
sylvania, being the owner of seven hundred acres of land there. His wife, 
Jane (Sterrett) McKnight. was also a native of Ireland. David Sterrett 
McKnight, father of Emma (]\IcKnight) Smith, was born in Meadville, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, died in 1878, aged seventy-four years; his 
wife, a native of Brookville. Crawford county, Pennsylvania, died in 1897, 
aged eighty-two years. She was a daughter of John and Sarah (Clauson) 
Wageley, who erected the second house in Meadville. where his deatli oc- 
curred, the death of his wife occurring in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
David Sterrett and Elizabeth (Wageley) McKnight were the parents of ten 
children: Sarah Catherine, deceased; David Sterrett. deceased; Robert 
Prime; Harriet Melissa, deceased: infant, deceased; Emma, aforementioned; 
Anna Eliza; Mary Elizabeth; John Albert, died January 20, 191 1, he was a 
Congregational minister ; William Wageley. 



In the death of John Adams, for many years a prominent resi- 

ADAMS dent of Tarentum, the community lost not only a singularly 

successful man, but a most worthy and honored citizen. He 

was not only successful himself, but was largely influential in the success 

of others, and he has left to posterity that priceless heritage, an honored 

rame. 

John Adams was born in the state of Pennsylvania, in 1834, son of 

Adams, whose death occurred many years ago. and Sarah (Adams'! 

Adams, who after the death of her first husband married Isaac Milligan. bv 
whom she had a large family, all of whom are now deceased. She died in 



538 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Tarentum, 1904, aged ninety-three years. Alexander Adams, brother of 
John Adams, enlisted from Tarentum, under Captain Boyd, in the One Hun- 
dred and Twenty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry ; he 
married Belle Thompson and had two children : Charles, vice-president of 
the Postal Telegraph and Cable Company of New York City, a self-made 
man, married and has two children ; Harry, died aged four years. 

John Adams was reared in Freeport, Pennsylvania, educated in its 
public schools, and came to Tarentum, in 1859, unmarried, and he and his 
brother Alexander were engaged in the foundry and contracting business 
until the Civil War broke out when Alexander went to the front, and John 
Adams sold out his interest in the business, after which he became a coal 
operator, owning a farm which was underlaid with coal, and he also operated 
a stone quarry, from which he derived a handsome income, becoming a 
well-to-do man, although starting out with no capital, but with a large stock 
of perseverence, energy and thrift. For ten years prior to his death he led 
a retired life, enjoying the fruit of his many years of toil. He owned prop- 
erty in Tarentum, Pennsylvania, erecting a house in 1865, in which he re- 
sided until his death, December 21, 1912, and in which his widow and chil- 
dren are residing at the present time (1914). He was also the owner of a 
farm in the state of Virginia. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, as is also his wife, and in politics he adhered to the principles of 
the Republican party. 

Mr. Adams married, December 11, 1859, Helen Marr Calpass, born in 
Miami county, Ohio, March 26, 1842, daughter of Christopher and Mary 
Ann (Ford) Calpass, the former named born in England, in 181 1. died in 
Tarentum, Pennsylvania, in 1889, and his wife was born in Virginia, in 
1817, died in Powhatan county, Virginia, in 1879, and there buried. After 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Calpass settled in Miami county, Ohio ; in 
185 1 removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ; resided for a short period of time 
at Monaca, Pennsylvania, removing from there to Bridgewater, Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade of tailor; in 1854 removed 
to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, and some years later purchased a farm in 
Powhatan county, Virginia, but subsequently returned to Tarentum, where 
his death occurred. He was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the 
Episcopal Church, his wife having been a member of the Baptist Church. 
Their children were : Helen Marr, aforementioned ; William Wallace, of 
Mount Chestnut, Butler county, Pennsylvania. Christopher Calpass was the 
son of Robert and Mary (Blackburn) Calpass, the former named of whom 
came from England to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, and died there at the home 
of his son, and the latter named died in England. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adams were the parents of ten children : i. Ella Amanda, 
widow of Matthew Shields Adams. 2. John Christopher, a resident of 
Creensburg, Pennsylvania; married and is the father of ten children, all of 
whom are living: Charles, Lewis, Le Roy, John, Helen, George, Howard, 
Mabel, James, Paul. 3. Charles Albert, a resident of Farr. Pennsylvania; 
married and is the father of two children : Clifford and Welty. 4. Harry 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVAMA 539 

Hamilton, a resident of Duqucsne, TcMui^ylvania ; married anrl is the father 
of two children: Gladys and Russell. 5. Robert Alexander, a resiflent of 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; married and is the father of four children: 
Carl, Helen, Marion, Kenneth. 6. Edward Thomas, a resiflent of Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania ; married and is the father of one child, Laura. 7. Fulton Lee, 
a resident of New Kensington, Pennsylvania ; married and was the father 
of two children: Walter, deceased; Violet. 8. Mary, wife of Samuel Clark 
Morgan, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 9. Violet lola, wife of Arthur Walter 
Waltenbaugh, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania; children: Arthur Adams and 
Belva Marr. 10. Frank Ford, deceased. 



The two generations of this English family that have had Amer- 
SAINT ican homes have, in the line here followed, been alike in one 

respect, that father and son were both engaged in contracting 
operations in Allegheny county. Pennsylvania. This was the calling of 
James Saint, born in England, who after coming to this country made his 
home in Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was in busi- 
ness until his death, in November, 1888. James Saint was a communicant 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was identified with the Republican 
party. He married Emily Seavey, born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
who now lives in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. Children of James and Emily 
(Seavey) Saint: W. J. T. ; Emma, married Dr. S. P. Barnes, of Massillon, 
Stark county, Ohio ; Josiah Seavey, of whom further ; Anna T. 

Josiah Seavey Saint was born in Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 6, 1862. That place was his boyhood home, and there he 
passed his later years. His education was obtained in the public schools and 
the Sharpsburg Academy, his studies being completed in Allegheny College. 
Mr. Saint's first occupation was that which had previously claimed his 
father's attention and labors, contracting, and after withdrawing from this 
line he established in Sharpsburg as a hardware merchant, there being pro- 
prietor of a store for thirty years. His position as one of the foremost busi- 
ness men of the borough was an assured one, and his store received the 
generous patronage that invariably rewards courteous attention, good ser- 
vice and fair value. Mr. Saint was prominent in the founding and organ- 
ization of the Citizens' Deposit and Trust Company, of Sharpsburg, at the 
first election of officers being made its president, administering this im- 
portant office until his death. November 14, 1913. The resolutions of ap- 
preciation and condolence passed by the board of directors of this institu- 
tion at this time were echoed in sincere sympathy by his numberless friends, 
to whom his life, passed in honest effort and the favor of his fellows, had 
been at once an object of true admiration and earnest emulation. To his 
family he was the kind, loving and devoted husband and father, the affection 
that was lavished in the home circle nerving and strengthening him for his 
daily tasks and duties. Mr. Saint affiliated with the Republican party, and 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Saint married, March 2g, 1888, Kate C. born at Etna. Allegheny 



540 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

county, Pennsylvania, July 14, 1861, daughter of James L. and Mary (Corns) 
Henderson. Children: i. Marie Anna, born December 19, 1889; educated 
at Oberlin College; married George F. Smith, of Denver, Colorado. 2. 
James Henderson, born August 23, 1891 ; a hardware merchant of Sharps- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 3. William Seavey, born July 25, 1893; connected 
with the Citizens' Deposit and Trust Company, of Sharpsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Isabella Catherine, born February 2, 1895 ; a student in high 
school. 5. Charles C, born October 8, 1897 ; a student. The family resi- 
dence continues at No. 1 1 1 Eastern avenue, Aspinwall, Pennsylvania. 



Huntingdon, York and Washington counties, Pennsyl- 
JOHNSTON vania, early knew the name of Johnston, and the members 

of this branch have since made the name a common one in 
all parts of the state and county. It appeared in York county with James 
Johnston, who about 1879 moved to Washington county, where his death 
occurred. He married Elizabeth McCalley, a native of Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. They had several children, one of whom, Andrew, is men- 
tioned further. 

(II) Andrew Johnston, son of James Johnston, was born at Peach 
Bottom, York county, Pennsylvania, in 1787, died in 1866. In manhood he 
became a miller, but spent the greater part of his active years in agricultural 
pursuits. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, while 
in politics he was first a Whig and then a Republican. He married Rebecca, 
daughter of Joseph Robb, born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

Toseph Robb was a son of John Robb ; he settled in St. Clair township, 
where he died. One of his sons, Isaac, settled in Westmoreland county, 
where he laid out the town of Robbstown, now West Newton. Joseph Robb 
inherited the homestead, and there lived until his death. He was the father 
of: Chesterfield, a physician of Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania; Harvey, in- 
herited the homestead, at one time register of wills in Allegheny county ; 
Rebecca, of previous mention, married Andrew Johnston, and died in 1884. 
Children of Andrew and Rebecca (Robb) Johnston: William Robb, of 
whom further ; Alexander Finley ; Thomas, died aged eighteen years ; Ada, 
married John D. Carson, of Sewickley, Pennsylvania. 

(III) William Robb Johnston, son of Andrew and Rebecca (Robb) 
Johnston, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1843, 
and lived on the farm in that county until he was eighteen years of age. 
The outbreak of the Civil War finding him at the age necessary for enlist- 
ment he became a member of Company D, One Hundred and Forty-ninth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, in August, 1862, and he fought 
in all the battles in which the Army of the Potomac was engaged from that 
time until the declaration of peace. Chancellorsville and Gettysburg saw him 
in action, and on May 8, 1864, he was wounded at Spottsylvania Court 
House, and rejoined his regiment on the 6th of the following August before 
Petersburg. On September i, 1864, he became a sergeant, and received an 
honorable discharge at the close of the war with this rank. Mr. Johnston 




6i^y^ 




(^-^^ 



WESTERN PENXSYLVAMA 541 

came to licllevue, Pennsylvania, in i^(><j, anrl lias there since made his home, 
for the past twenty years enj^aj^ing in real estate and insurance dealings. 
For ahout thirty years he held the office of justice of the peace, has been 
tax collector since the creation of that office, and in 1883 was elected county 
director of the poor. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic Order, being a charter member and 
()ast master of Bellevue Lodge, Free and Accepter! Masons, a charter mem- 
ber of Bellevue Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and the only surviving charter 
member of Allegheny Commandery, Knights Templar. He also is a mem- 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Union \'eteran Legion. 
Mr. Johnston is prominent among the leading citizens of Bellevue, and 
wields a weighty influence in the circles in which he moves. 

Mr. Johnston married, in 1873, Emma, daughter of Hugh Forester, the 
latter an early settler of Bellevue. Children of William Robb and Emma 
(Forester) Johnston: i. Andrew, married a Miss Myers, and resides in 
Bellevue; they have children: Elizabeth and Andrew. 2. Mary Florence, 
married Albert Craig. 3. Emma, married Walter W. Wilson, son of 
Samuel Winfield Wilson, of Clarion, Pennsylvania; they are the parents of 
Xancy, Samuel, Winfield, Emma Louise. 



Once more are the pages of history turned to Germany for the 
FEHR ancestry of American citizens who have arrived at positions of 

prominence justifying the term success, this time in the case of 
George B. Fehr, of Aspinwall, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He is a 
son of Henry and Mary (Koch) Fehr, both of his parents natives of Ger- 
many who immigrated to the L'nited States, settling in Pittsburgh, where 
they died, he in 1871, she in 1908. They were the parents of: Sarah, 
Martha, George B., of whom further, Mary, Albert, Emma, Lillie. 

George B. Fehr was born in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, in December. 
1863. He was reared in the city of his birth and there attended the public 
schools, l^eginning his business career as a youth as a cash boy. his weekly 
pay being one dollar and a quarter. For a time thereafter he was 
employed in Klorman's Steel Mills on Thirty-third street, a concern after- 
ward absorbed by the Carnegie interests, there remaining for about two 
years. At the early age of sixteen years he opened a most interesting 
chapter in his life by accepting a position as a commercial traveler, during 
the course of his continuance in that line covering practically all of the 
L^nited States, gaining an experience and a knowledge that has been almost 
invaluable to him in his later business life. He was at one time proprietor 
of an art store on Federal street. Allegheny City (Pittsburgh X'orth Side). 
in 1906 organizing the Aspinwall Delafield Company, which concern laid 
out the Delafield addition to Aspinwall and Delafield Heights, the latter 
being an operation extending over an area of three hundred and fifty acres. 
The Aspinwall-Delafield Company has conducted the promotion of this 
locality in an admirable manner, has attracted thither people of means and 
desirability, and has firmly established it as one of the finest suburban dis- 



542 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

tricts ill Allegheny county. Mr. Fehr was one of the organizers, and is at 
this time a director, of the First National Bank, of Aspinwall. The spirit 
of accomplishment that has been Mr. Fehr's distinguishing characteristic 
in business dealings has been plainly noticeable in his public and political 
career. A Republican in politics, he has served as president of the Aspin- 
wall council, and in this and other relations to the municipal life has given 
of the best of his service and time. No worthy project has been inaugu- 
rated in Aspinwall that lacked his hearty and enthusiastic support, and his 
place as a substantial, progressive and representative citizen is secure. He 
and his wife are communicants of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He mar- 
ried, in 1896, Emma E. Lepper, of Lawrence ville, Pennsylvania, and h.is 
children : Catherine, Elizabeth. George Milton. 



Henry Gilbert Emerick is a member of one of the old 
EMERICK pioneer families of western Pennsylvania, who by dint of 
their courage, enterprise and hard work, laid the foundation 
of the present greatness and prosperity of the region. 

( I ) The first of the Emerick name to come from more eastern parts to 
the country west of the great Appalachian highlands was the great-grand- 
father of Henry G. Emerick, who was a pioneer in Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he settled and cleared away enough land from the wilder- 
ness to farm. Here he and his wife died leaving nine children, some of 
whom are yet living. They were as follows : David, deceased ; Sarah, living 
at the age of eighty-five years; Hannah, deceased; Daniel, deceased; Lena, 
deceased ; Eliza, deceased ; Henry ; Alaria and Margaret, the last named 
living at the age of seventy years. 

(H) Henry Emerick, the seventh child of the pioneer, and grandfather 
of Henry G. Emerick, was also a native of the eastern part of the state and 
presumably came west at the time of his parents" emigration. He married 
a Miss Stout and one of their children was Henry, of whom further. 

(HI) Henry (2) Emerick, son of Henry (i) Emerick, was born on 
a farm in possession of his father in Economy township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, May 6, 1834. He was reared on the farm where he was born, 
and obtained his education in the local schools. He became a farmer, re- 
verting thus to the occupation of his grandfather, his father having been a 
carpenter by trade. In his politics, however, he followed in his father's 
footsteps, they both being staunch members of the Republican party. He 
married Eliza Otto, a native of Butler county, Pennsylvania, having been 
born near Brush Creek in the year 1844. She was the only daughter of 
her parents who were early settlers in New Sewickley township, Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, Both Mr. and Mrs. Emerick Sr. are members of the 
Breitenstein Lutheran Church. Mrs. Emerick died in the year 1900, but 
he is still living. To them were born ten children, as follows: Henry Gil- 
bert, of whom further; Getley ; Clara, now Mrs. George Shaffer; Elizabeth, 
who lives at home with her father; Mary, now Mrs. Edwin Gross; Ida, 
now Mrs. Sherman Gray, of Leetsdale, Pennsylvania ; George, a resident of 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 543 

Rochester, Pennsylvania; Tillie, now Mrs. William Micks, of Cleveland, 
Ohio; Emma, now Mrs. John Keown, of Economy township, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania; Oscar, a resiflent of Cleveland, Ohio. 

(IV) Henry Gilhert Emerick, eldest child of Henry (2) and Eliza 
(Otto) Emerick, was horn Novemher 30, i860, on the oM homestead in 
Economy township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on the 
farm until he reached the age of eighteen years, anrl then learned the car- 
penter's trade. He then removed to Allegheny. Pennsylvania, where he 
worked at his trade for eleven years. At the end of this period he removed 
to Edgeworth, near Sewickley, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, anrl here he 
has lived for the past twenty-three years. On hecoming settled in this 
region, he engaged in a contracting and building business, an enterprise 
which has prospered greatly. Mr. Emerick is a Democrat in politics, and a 
member of the Elks of Ambridge. 

Mr. Emerick married. May 21, 1891, Emma Schleiter, a native of 
Freedom, Pennsylvania, where she was born May 29, 1869. Mrs. Emerick 
was a daughter of Conrad and Fredericka (Flehmannj Schleiter. Mr. 
Schleiter was a native of Rosental, Germany, where he was born in 1839. 
and his wife was also born in that country in 1843. They came to this 
country from Germany singly and were married in New York State. They 
later removed to Freedom, Pennsylvania, in 1844, where Mr. Schleiter 
owned marble and granite works and did an extensive business which 
enabled him to retire when fifty-seven years of age. Both he and Mrs. 
Schleiter are members of the Lutheran Church. They are the parents of 
twelve children, as follows : William, Edward, Emma, Henry, Frederick, 
P'rank, Adelia, Conrad. Wilhelmina, August. George and Carl. Mr. and 
Mrs. Emerick are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and in that 
belief have reared their family of four children, who are as follows: Flor- 
ence, born March 17, 1892, now the wife of Alva P. Crum, of Conway, 
Pennsylvania; Frederick C. born December 9, 1893, educated in the Edge- 
worth public schools, in the Sewickley High School, which he attended for 
two years, and for two years and a half studied in the American Bridge 
Company's school, is now a mechanic, a templet maker by trade, working 
on the government works and has also been employed by J. B. Semple ; 
Mary, born April 20, 1897. now in high school; Edward, born March 2, 
1906. 



From Scotland, the land of its origin, to Ireland, and 
BREADING thence to America has been the course of the Breading 
family, numerous in Pennsylvania. The cause that im- 
pelled the members thereof to seek voluntary exile was the religious unrest 
in Scotland, while their further pilgrimage was a search for improved condi- 
tions and wider opportunities than those aflforded by their adopted Irish 
land. 

(I) The American ancestor of this line was David Breading, born in 
Ireland, who came to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1728. accompanied 
by his son, James, of whom further. 



544 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(II) James Breading, son of David Breading, married in Pennsylvania, 
and had two sons: i. Nathaniel, born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 
1 75 1, died in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in 1822; he served in the 
American army under General Washington in the Revolutionary War ; he 
held the title of judge and was early upon the bench of Pennsylvania ; he 
married Ann, daughter of General Ewing. 2. David, of whom further. 

(III) David (2) Breading, son of James Breading, was born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1756. He served under General Washington in the 
Revolution and was a witness of that general's stern reprimand of General 
Lee. He married and had a son David, of whom further. 

(IV) David (3) Breading, son of David (2) Breading, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, died in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in 
1844, having moved to that locality in 1794. He was a farmer throughout 
his entire life, his death occurring when he was eighty-six years of age. 
He married, November 17, 1785, Elizabeth Clark, who died March 22, 1855. 
They had children : James, Eliza, Jane, married William Scott, Nancy, 
married William Lagow, Clark, of whom further. The first named four 
died at Troyhurst, Indiana, the victims of a scourge of cholera. 

(V) Clark Breading, son of David (3) and Elizabeth (Clark) Breading, 
was born in Luzerne township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 
1806, died April 12, 1883. He grew to manhood on his father's farm, and 
to obtain an education walked daily more than four miles to the nearest 
school during three winter months. Opportunity was not given to attend 
school for a longer period of time, for the youths of the neighborhood were 
busied in what were considered far more practical occupations than the 
acquiring of an education, and it was only by diligent solitary study that 
Clark Breading secured the sound education that was his. Until 1865 he 
engaged in farming, in that year purchasing the property at the corner of 
Main street and Vernon avenue, there living until his death. For many 
years he conducted extensive stock dealing operations. His political belief 
was the Republican, and he was a member of the Masonic Order. He mar- 
ried (first) May i, 1827, Mary Craft, who died June 2, 1828; (second) 
September 10, 1834, Hettie Jane Roberts, died January 10, 1868. She was 
a sister of Colonel William Y. Roberts, a native of Luzerne township, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where he was reared to manhood and died. 
He was at one time a member of the Pennsylvania state legislature, and 
moved to Kansas, being a participant in the stirring events that gained for 
that state the tile of "Bleeding Kansas." He recruited a regiment from that 
state and commanded it throughout the Civil War. By his first marriage 
Clark Breading had one daughter, Margaret, who married, May 10, 1849, 
Dr. O. E. Newton, and resided in Cincinnati, Ohio. He had one son by his 
marriage with Hettie Jane Roberts, John C, of whom further. 

(VI) John C. Breading, only child of Clark and Hettie Jane (Roberts) 
Breading, was bom in Luzerne township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
August 5, 1851. Until he was seventeen years of age he lived on his father's 
farm, obtaining his education in the public schools, attending the Davidson 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVAXIA 545 

School, later Merrittstown Academy, and the Tuscarora Academy, near 
Philadelphia, lie became a druggist and for many year.-, was in business in 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1896 moving to Pittsburgh. Four years later 
he established in the real estate business at Bellevue, Pennsylvania, and has 
since been in that line, conducting in connection therewith insurance deal- 
ings, owning considerable property at the present time. His reputation as a 
business man of honor and integrity could not be firmer, and his upright 
conduct has held and holds the well-merited confidence of his associates and 
friends. As a Republican he was a member of the Uniontown Council, and 
has served in the same capacity in Bellevue for five years, in 1912 and 1913 
as president of that body. To the discliarge of the duties of this office he 
has bent the whole of his energetic progressiveness, and as a public official 
met with popular favor, irrespective of party lines. He holds the thirty- 
second degree in the Masonic Order, belonging to Bellevue Lodge, Xo. 530. 
Free and Accepted Masons. Bellevue Chapter. N'o. 286, Royal Arch Masons, 
Allegheny Commandery. Xo. 35, Knights Templar, and Pittsburgh Consis- 
tory. He and his family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Breading married, August 13, 1871, Elma, daughter of Xathaniel 
and Elma Brownfield, of Uniontown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, her 
parents natives of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Breading are the parents of: 
I. Clark, a salesman, resides in Uniontown, Pennsylvania; he married and 
has children: John, Elma, Ralph. 2. Hettie, married Alfred C. Stafford. 
of Bellevue; they are the parents of Alfred and Jane. 3. Frank B., for 
fourteen years connected with the United States postal service at Bellevue : 
married and has children, Frank and Helen. 4. Xathaniel IM., a resident of 
Bellevue, has been associated with the Mellon National Bank of Pittsburgh 
since its organization in 1903. 5. Elma, died in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 
aged six years. 



James Greenough is a member of an English family 
GREEXOUGH representative of the best type of that strong stock which 

has formed the background for the developing national- 
ity of the United States of America and remains to this day a leaven of 
sturdy worth in the cosmopolitan citizenship of this country. His parents 
on both sides of the house were English and he himself was a native of 
that country. His paternal grandparents passed their entire live? in Lan- 
cashire, England, and here, too, his father, Peter Greenough, lived, holding 
a position of manager in some coal mines in that region. He died in the 
year 1871, when only forty-five years of age, his wife surviving him until 
191 1, when she died at the advanced age of ninety- two years. He married 
Mary Gregory, also a native of Lancashire, where she was born in the year 
1819. She was the daughter of Thomas and Betty (Hay) Gregory, life-long 
residents of that region. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Peter Greenough were born four- 
teen children in all, ten sons and four daughters, six of the boys, however, 
died in early childhood, leaving but eight who attained maturity. These 
were as follows : Ann, Bettie, Esther, Mary Alice, deceased, John. James, 
of whom further; Thomas Peter. 



546 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

James Greenough was born December 15, 1856, in Lancashire, England. 
He passed his childhood and early youth in that country and there received 
his education. At the age of twenty years, however, April 7, 1876, he set 
sail for the United States, and after a voyage lasting thirteen days he arrived 
in this country. He went first to Port Perry, Pennsylvania, remained in that 
place but a year, and in 1877 went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. On the 
night of Saturday following the Pittsburgh riot, Mr. Greenough walked 
from that city to Bellevue, Pennsylvania, and there has made his home ever 
since. He stopped for a time with his uncle, Mr. John Greenough, who 
as a young man had come to America, settling first in Scranton. Pennsyl- 
vania, where he secured a position as boss in a coal mine. He later removed 
to Bellevue. where he died in the year 1895, at which time he was engaged 
in a contracting business. James Greenough was a coal miner, and worked 
for some time for Joseph Brown, a mine owner. He later entered the con- 
tracting business, in which, for twenty-one years he has now been engaged, 
and during this time he has paved almost all the streets in Bellevue. His 
business has thus been extremely flourishing, and Mr. Greenough is now a 
man of substance and a prominent figure in the community. He is active 
in many ways in the town life, and finds time to give to many interests 
beyond his mere business transactions. Mr. Greenough is a member of the 
Republican party, and takes a keen interest in all political questions whether 
they apply to the mere local running of afifairs or have a more general 
application. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, No. 339, Allegheny. Pennsylvania. He is now a large property owner 
on Carolyn avenue. Bellevue, and on the Walsen Place, where he owns 
what is known as the Jack's Run Stone Quarry. 

In 1879, three years after his first arrival in the Lmited States, Mr. 
Greenough returned to England, and there, in the same year, married Ellen 
Johnson, a native of Lancashire, England, Mr. Greenough's home county. 
Miss Johnson was a daughter of William Johnson, a life-long resident in 
England. ]\Ir. and ]Mrs. Greenough shortly returned to America, and to 
them have been born since then seven children, as follows: Peter, de- 
ceased ; James Jr. ; William, deceased ; John, deceased ; Mary Alice, died 
July, 191 1, at the age of twenty-three years; Ann, now nineteen years of 
age; Ethel, aged seventeen, a graduate of the Bellevue Pligh School and now 
a student in the Parks Institute. 



This is a partial record of a family more intimately con- 
LUTTON nected with the history of Maryland than with that of Penn- 
sylvania, although the line has been resident in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, since 1844, when Benjamin Lutton came thither from 
Maryland. He was a son of James and Eleanor Lutton, both born near 
Baltimore, Maryland, in which state their lives were passed. They were the 
parents of several children. 

(II) Benjamin Lutton, son of James and Eleanor Lutton. was born 
in Baltimore, Maryland, in t8o2, died in Pittsburgh North Side, in 1874. 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVy\NIA 547 

He grew to manhood in the place if his Ijirth and tlicre resided until about 
1844, when he moved to Pittsburgh, in the mills of which city he founci 
employment as a co])per and steel roller, passing the remaining years of his 
life in that place. He married Jane (Perrine) Lutton, the widow of his 
brother, James. Children of her first marriage: William Henry, born 
October 30, 1823, died in 1910; Mary Ann, born February 23, 1826. Chil- 
dren of Benjamin and Jane (Perrine) (Lutton) Lutton: James Taylor, 
born January i, 1829; Elizabeth Taylor, born November 3, 1831, died August 
26. 1833; Elizabeth Jane, born March 30, 1834; Eleanor, born November 
7, 1836; Benjamin, born May 4, 1839, died in 1903; Susanna, born Jan- 
uary 25, 1842; John, born August 18, 1845; Albert, of whom further. 

(HI) Albert Lutton, son of Benjamin and Jane (Perrine) (Lutton) 
Lutton, was born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 7, 
1849. His boyhood home was on the North Side, and here he attended the 
public schools, finishing his studies in the Iron City College. His first posi- 
tion in the business world was as bookkeeper, after which he became one of 
the proprietors of a toy store on Federal street, Pittsburgh, the firm name 
being Balsley & Lutton. He held other business connections, and pros- 
pered materially, his reputation as a man of responsible position and un- 
questioned business probity being gained through years of upright and fair 
dealing with his fellows. He was a Republican in political sympathy, and for 
eleven years filled the office of city assessor of Pittsburgh, an ofifice of great 
importance and requiring an incumbent of no small ability. He fraternized 
with the Knights of Pythias, and with his wife and daughter attended the 
Presbyterian Church, to which Mrs. Lutton and her daughter now belong. 
His death occurred February 11. 1904, the sincere regret of his friends 
and business associates speaking plainly the manner of man he was. 

Mr. Lutton married. May 15, 1877. Lillie, born on Ohio street, Alle- 
gheny City, Pennsylvania, in 1855, daughter of Adam and Jane (Irvin) 
Bepler, her father born in Germany in 1823, died in Allegheny City in 
1876, her mother a native of Butler county, Pennsylvania, born in 1829. 
died in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, September 25, 1905. Adam Bepler 
left the land of his birth when sixteen years of age. and after coming to 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, established omnibus service between Pitts- 
burgh and Woods Run, also becoming proprietor of the Bull's Head Hotel, 
which he conducted for some years. He then went to the west for a short 
time, upon his return making his home in Pittsburgh and there conducting 
a hotel, subsequently building the Farmers' Hotel, in the management of 
which he prospered to a gratifying degree. Children of Adam and Jane 
(Irvin) Bepler: William, deceased; Anna Mary, deceased; Lillie, of previ- 
ous mention, married Albert Lutton ; Adam ; Charles ; Robert Francis, de- 
ceased ; George Albert : Ida Louisa, deceased ; Jennie \'. Children of Albert 
and Lillie ( P)epler ) Lutton: Charles Elmer, born April 3. 1878. died in 
November, 1881 ; Alice May, born in Allegheny City. ]Mav 19. 1880. edu- 
cated in the public schools of that city, married. June i. 1914. Joseph 
Charles Mitchell. 



548 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

English records reveal for this Straw family an ancestry an- 

STRAW cient and claiming among its members those whose deeds have 

shed honor upon the family name. While comparatively new 

in the United States, here, as in the homeland, its record is a proud one in 

that its sons have led lives of active usefulness and have manfully played 

their part in whatever condition of life they have been placed. 

This chronicle opens with the founder of the American line, Richard 
Straw, born in Derbyshire, England, j\Iarch 23, 1819. He mastered the 
tailor's trade in his native land and was there educated, coming to the United 
States in young manhood and settling in Pittsburgh. In 1840 he became 
proprietor of a tailoring establishment on Liberty street, later conducting 
one at Market and Second streets, in Pittsburgh, in 1853 coming to the 
present borough of P>ellevue. In this locality he purchased a small farm, 
and there lived until his death, August i, 1900. Aside from the tailoring 
establishments of which he was at different times owner, his only business 
interest was in the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He prospered in 
business, and during his active career acquired a comfortable competence. 
The Republican party held his political support, and with his wife he was a 
member of the Methodist Protestant Church. 

He married, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, February i, 1847, Hannah, 
born on the Isle of Man, May 26, 1820, died November 29, 1886, daughter 
of Rev. William and Elizabeth (Bates) Alcock. Rev. William Alcock, son 
of Samuel and Mary Alcock, was born in Castle Edinburgh, Scotland, in 
1798, his parents of English families, having resided in Scotland during the 
year of his birth, Samuel Alcock having served in the English army. Rev. 
William Alcock was a minister of the Methodist Protestant Church, and 
came from Manchester, England, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in pursuit of 
his ministerial duties. He married, in May, 1821, his wife a daughter of 
Samuel Bates, who passed his life in England. Rev. William Alcock died 
in Carnegie, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in January, 1879, his wife 
having preceded him to the grave, her death occurring in Bellevue, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1871. Children of Richard and Hannah (Alcock) Straw: 
Anna, of whom further; Charles F., born July 27, 1849; Frank W., bom 
November 19, 1851; John H., born April i, 1853; Emma, born February 
23, 1855; Richard, born July 9, 1857; Walter H., of whom further; Percy 
B., born August 7, 1862; William Lincoln, born November 23, 1864. 

Anna Straw, daughter of Richard and Hannah (Alcock) Straw, was 
born May 21, 1848. She was reared in Ross township, being educated in the 
public schools and in the Pittsburgh Female College. She married, May 21. 
1872, Edward George Whitehead, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 
30, 1849, son of Ralph and Sarah (Collins) Whitehead, his father born 
in Duckingfield, Lancashire, England, in 1807. his mother in Aston-under 
Lyne, England, in 1819. Ralph and Sarah (Collins) Whitehead came to 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, soon after their marriage, and there both died, 
at their home in the East End. Edward George Whitehead was reared in 
Pittsburgh, there obtained his education in the public schools, and in young 



WICSTERX IM-:\.\SYLVA\I.\ 549 

manhood leamed 1he j)liotograplier's art. I'^or a long time he was associated 
witli his brother, William ilcnry, as jjroprietors of a photograph '•tiulio 
en Fifth avenue, later l)eing connected with Mr. M(jrris r^n .Sixth street. 
About 1874 Mr. Whitehead came to Bellevue, Penn.sylvania, where he re■^ides 
to the present time. With his wife he is a communicant of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. Children of I'-dward George and Anna (Straw; White- 
head: I. Anna A., born June 2, 1873; married Willis Clancy, two children, 
Preston and Willis, Jr., resides on ICuclid avenue, liellevue. 2. Charles 
Edward, born December 10, 1877; educated in the Pittsburgh High School 
and a graduate in dentistry from the University of Pittsburgh, now a prac- 
ticing dentist of P)ellevue, Pennsylvania; he married Ida Mary Shaffer, two 
children, Donald Edward and John Paul. 3. Courtlandt Kenneth, born De- 
cember 9, 1888; educated in tlie public schools, including a course in high 
schools, now a student in civil engineering at the Carnegie Technical In- 
stitute. 

Walter H. Straw, son of Richard and Hannah (Alcock) Straw, was 
born in Bellevue, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. May 6, i860. He ob- 
tained a public school education, and in young manhood embarked in 
grocery dealings, meeting with early success and continuing in this line for 
several years. In later years he devoted his attention to contracting, and in 
that line has performed a great deal of work throughout the county, execut- 
ing numerous large and important commissions, and because of his depend- 
able thoroughness and particular attention to detail has acquired wide 
reputation. He is the owner of a portion of the homestead, and built for his 
own use a beautiful house on the Brighton Road, exceptionally attractive 
in design and made from the best materials obtainable. Mr. Straw has, 
during his entire business life, held the trusting confidence of his associates, 
being in every relation to his fellows truthful, reliable and honest. Of him 
as a citizen it can but be said that his influence is ever cast on the side of 
the right, and that he supports vigorously any project for the improvement 
or advancement of Bellevue. He is a staunch Republican, and he and his 
wife belong to the Methodist Protestant Church. 

Mr. Straw married. September 16, 1885, Lena X., born in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. October 31, i860, daughter of Orlando and Eliza Jane (Rich- 
ardson) Nardi, her father a native of Lucca, Italy, her mother born in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania. Orlando Nardi came to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, when a young man, and there married, his wife a daughter of 
William and Prudence (Farrman) Richardson, pioneers of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. Children of Orlando and Eliza lane (Richardson") 
Nardi: i. William, deceased. 2. Pasquale, deceased. 3. Lena X. of previ- 
ous mention, married Walter H. Straw. Children of Walter H. and Lena 
N. (Nardi) Straw: i. Ethel Xardi, born April 30, 1888: a gradiate of 
the Bellevue High School and IMaryland College. 2. Richard Frank, born 
April 24. 1892; a graduate of high school, now a student in the I'niver- 
sity of Pittsburgh, having for one year attended Purdue University. 



550 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Germany is the land whence came Frederick Heinz, his an- 
HEINZ castors having there been resident for many generations. He 

is a son of Frederick and Rosena ( Schrader ) Heinz, both 
natives and Hfe-long residents of Germany. 

Frederick Heinz Jr. was born in Germany, January 17. 1824, being 
there reared and educated, in 1869 immigrating to the United States, settHng 
in Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. In this place he learned 
the florist's trade, or, as it should be more property designated, art. and 
was for a short time in business in Darlington, later, with his cousin, H. J. 
Heinz, becoming superintendent of a fann, a line that he afterward fol- 
lowed principally. He was a resident of Sharpsburg until 1909, in that year 
moving to Aspinwall. in the same county, where he built a handsome resi- 
dence and where he has since lived retired. In this place he is the owner 
of a model green-house, conducted upon latest methods, and producing 
excellent growths. Mr. Heinz is identified politically with the Republican 
party, and holds membership in the German Lutheran Church at Sharpsburg. 
Mr. Heinz is interested in the firm of H. J. Heinz & Company, his first 
cousin being the head of that widely known pickling concern, and through 
other business connections holds position as one of the most prosperous of 
the citizens of Aspinwall. 

Mr. Heinz married, at Darlington, Pennsylvania, in November, 1870, 
Rebecca Secamp, a native of Germany, and has children: i. Charles, 
a resident of Aspinwall, Pennsylvania. 2. Anna Margaret, married John H. 
Bokerman (q. v.), of Aspinwall. Pennsylvania. 3. Betta, married Frank 
Markwid, of Sharon, Pennsylvania. 



James H. Taylor was a member of an Irish family represen- 
TAYLOR tative of that courageous and enterprising Celtic stock which 
has added so valuable a leaven to the cosmopolitan citizenship 
of this country. 

His father was David Taylor, a native of Ireland, where he was bom 
in the year 1803, and came to the Lmited States while still a young man. His 
attention was called to the western part of Pennsylvania as a prosperous 
and rapidly developing portion of the country, and he went thither, settling 
in Allegheny county. His first employment was as a drayman, but he later 
engaged in the grocery business. His death occurred in Bellevue. where 
he had made his home, in 1893. Mr. Taylor married Agnes Hutcheson, 
also a native of Ireland, whose parents had early settled in Londonderry, 
Ohio, and had there eventually died. Mr. Taylor was a Republican in poli- 
tics, and both he and Mrs. Taylor were members of the Covenanter Church. 

James H. Taylor was born November 18, 1850. in a house on Robinson 
street, Allegheny. Pennsylvania. He passed his childhood in the city of his 
birth, receiving his education in the Fourth Ward public schools, and later 
in Dufif's Business College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Upon the completion 
of his studies, he became engaged in the insurance business, and in the year 
1892 he moved to Bellevue, Pennsylvania. Two years later he took a house 







^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVAN'IA 55i 

at No. 66 Euclid avenue, and there continued until his death, February 13, 
1909. Mr. Taylor was a member of the Republican party, as was his father 
before him, and took a keen interest in all questions of jjolitics, whether of 
local or general bearing. Me was a member of the United Presbyterian 
Church, as arc still his wife and children. 

Mr. Taylor married, June 14, 1894, Rose H. Gibson, a native of Hrigh- 
ton township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and sprung from distinguished 
ancestors through more than one line of descent. She is the daughter of 
John Glenn and Margary Jane ( McGeorge) Gibson, the former namerl born 
in May. 1829. The first of the name of Gibson to reach the western part of 
the state was William Gibson. Coming wdien the entire section was little 
more than a wilderness, Mr. Gibson brought with him his wife, who had been 
a Miss Laughhead, and a son, Joseph, the grandfather of Mrs. Taylor. 
Joseph Gibson passed his entire life in his native township He purchased a 
farm of some three hundred acres there and operated this until the time of 
his death. He was twice married, the first time to Jennette Glenn, by whom 
he had a son, John Glenn Gibson, the only child of this union. His second 
wife was Ellen McGeorge, and by this marriage also there was but one child, 
a son, Daniel, now living on the old Gibson farm. John Glenn Gibson, the 
father of Mrs. Taylor, married Margery Jane McGeorge, a daughter of 
William and Nancy (Young) McGeorge, and a granddaughter of William 
and Julia Ann (Haten) McGeorge. The elder William McGeorge was a 
native of Scotland, his wife coming of an old English family. Together 
they migrated to the United States, and settled first in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, and later in Beaver county, in the pioneer days, Mr. George owning 
five hundred acres there. He died in the year 181 5, when only fifty- three 
years of age. Nancy (Young) McGeorge, wife of William jMcGeorge, was a 
daughter of John and Marjorie (Algeo) Young. John Young was a son of 
William and Nancy (Hamilton) Young, Nancy Hamilton being a descen- 
dant of Patrick Hamilton, one of the Scotch martyrs of the Reformation, 
bom in 1504 and burned at the stake for his beliefs when only twenty-four 
years old. Patrick Hamilton was a grandson of the first Lord Hamilton 
and of James H.. King of Scotland. Mrs. Taylor was educated in the public 
schools of her native county, and in the State Normal School in Indiana 
county. Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. Taylor were born three children. 
as follows: James, Marjorie and Robert, all of whom are living. Mrs. 
Taylor is now employed as a teacher in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 



Lewis W. Noah is a member of a family representative of the 
NOAH best type of German-American character, which has added to 
the complex citizenship of the L'nited States the leaven of its 
own peculiar strength and perseverance. 

His father was Jacob Noah, a native of Germany, passing his childhood 
and youth in that country. He married Johanna Hoftner. also a native of 
Germany, and with her came to the United States. L^pon arriving in this 
country they proceeded at once to Butler county, Pennsylvania, and there 



552 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

settled on a farm, passing the remainder of their Hves in their new home. 
]Mr. Noah died in the year 1873, ^^ the age of eighty-one years, and his 
wife ten years later at the age of seventy-six years. In the "Fatherland" 
Mr. Noah had been a soldier, had served under Napoleon Bonaparte, and 
took part in that disastrous campaign which culminated in the retreat from 
Moscow and marked the beginning of that great soldier's fall. Mr. Noah 
was actually before Moscow and shared in all the perils and hardships of 
the historic retreat. In the "New World" he pursued the life and occupa- 
tion of a farmer, although never losing his interest in the politics of his 
time. A Whig at first, he eventually joined the Democratic party, a member 
of which he remained until his death. He and his wife were Lutherans 
in religion and in that belief reared their children. These were four in 
number, as follows: Julia Anna, who died in the year 1854, when but 
eighteen years of age; Magdalena, died in 1910, at about seventy years of 
age; Lewis W., of whom further; Peter, died in April, 1886, aged forty 
years, married Martha Caldwell ; children : Lula, deceased ; Anna, John, 
Lyman W'. 

Lewis W. Noah was born April 29, 1842, in Butler county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the old family homestead. He was educated in the local public 
schools, and upon completing his general studies, he learned the trade of 
carpenter, following the same throughout his life. He removed from his 
rural surroundings to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, where there was more 
work to be done, and here continued to live for twenty-five years. In the 
year 1890 he removed from Allegheny City to Ben Avon, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. Ben Avon was at that time called Killbuck township, and 
there Mr. Noah built a house at No. 7318 Church avenue. Mr. Noah is a 
member of the Republican party and takes a keen interest in all political 
issues, whether of local or general bearing. 

Mr. Noah married, in Alleghen}^ City, 1865, Elizabeth Pierce, of Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, where she was born November 15. 1841. Mrs. Noah 
was the daughter of Thomas and >Mary Ann (Bartley) Pierce, early settlers 
in Butler county, and both deceased. Mrs. Noah was a member of the 
L^nited Presbyterian Church, and her death occurred May 23, 1913. Mr. and 
Mrs. Noah were the parents of four children, as follows: i. William 
James, born in 1866; educated in the public schools of Allegheny; now a 
machinist living in Ben Avon, Pennsylvania ; married May Smare, by whom 
he has had one child, a daughter. May. 2. Ada May, educated in the public 
schools of Allegheny and in Curry College, Pennsylvania, and now following 
the profession of teaching in the schools of the Ninth Ward, Allegheny. 3. 
Minnie Etta, educated also in the Allegheny public schools and in Curry 
College, and now living at home with her parents. 4. Harry Addison, a 
graduate of the Allegheny High School, and now a salesman and resident of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Adam Noah, a half-brother of Lewis W. Noah, 
a son of his father by a former wife, and who had accompanied the elder 
Noah on his journey to the L^nited States, settled in West Virginia, and 
there died about the year 1904. 



WESTER X PEN X SYLVAN I A 553 

Dr. William John Kline Snyder is a member of an old 
SNYDER Pennsylvania family which for many generations has 
been identified with the life and traditions of the western 
part of the state. 

(I) Peter Snyder, paternal grandfather of Dr. William j. K. Snyder, 
was brought to Westmoreland ccjunty, i^ennsylvania, when but one year of 
age, by his parents, who migrated there from some more eastern region. 
The family settled on a farm, and there the parents eventually died. Mean- 
while Peter Snyder grew up on the farm, until he became old enough to 
learn a trade, when he chose carpentry, which he followed for a consider- 
able time in his native place. At length, however, he decided to try his 
fortunes still farther west, and accordingly went to Missouri, where in 
course of time he died. His wife then returned to Westmoreland county 
and lived with her son, Cyrus J. Snyder, until her death in 189 1, at the age 
of eighty-four years. Peter Snyder married Lydia Rowe, a native of 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where she was born. To them were 
born eight children, as follows: Hezekiah, a resident of Missouri, now de- 
ceased; Mary; I^ydia ; John; llettie, deceased; Lavinia, deceased; Cyrus 
J., of whom further; Uriah, a physician of Delmont, Pennsylvania, who died 
at the age of forty-two years. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Snyder were members 
of the Reformed Church, and in that belief reared their large family of 
children. Mr. Snyder was a Democrat in politics. 

(II ) Cyrus J. Snyder, seventh child of Peter and Lydia ( Rowe; Snyder, 
was lx)rn at Boquet, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and there has 
passed the greater part of his life. He was educated in the local schools. 
He is a Democrat in politics, and with his wife attends the Denmark }iIanor 
Reformed Church. He married Lydia Kline, also a native of Boquet, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, where she was born. Mrs. Snyder is a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth ( Knappenberger) Kline, both of whom were 
natives of Westmoreland county. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Kline were the parents of 
nine children, as follows : William John, M.D., now a physician of Greens- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in active practice ; Hezekiah, deceased ; Henry, deceased ; 
Nichols; Hannah, deceased; Mary; Lydia, the mother of our subject; Amos; 
Alpha, a minister of the Reformed Church at Grove City, Pennsylvania. 
To 'Sir. and Mrs. Cyrus J. Snyder have been born two children, as follows: 
Charles E., M.D., a practicing physician of Greensburg, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania; William John Kline, M.D., of whom further. 

(III) Dr. William John Kline Snyder, second child of Cyrus J. and 
Lydia (Kline) Snyder, was born December 24, 1864, at Boquet, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on the old Snyder farm in 
Manor Valley, Westmoreland county, and educated first at the local public 
schools. Having completed the elementary portion of his education, he 
matriculated at the Heidelberg University at Tiffin. Ohio, graduating there- 
from with the class of 1892. He then took an additional year's work at the 
Wooster Medical College of Cleveland, Ohio. His final preparatory work 
was done at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which he grad- 



554 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

uated in 1895. and from there removed directly to Avalon, Pennsylvania, 
v/here he established himself in what has proven a most successful medical 
practice. Dr. Snyder is associated with the medical associations of his dis- 
trict, being a member of the Allegheny County, the Pennsylvania State, and 
the Ohio Valley Medical societies and the American Aledical Association. 
Besides his professional connections. Dr. Snyder has other important in- 
terests, having to do with the development of the financial and business life 
of Avalon. He was one of the organizers of the Avalon Bank, and has 
held the presidency from its founding to the present time. Despite the great 
amount of time and energy which Dr. Snyder is obliged to give to these 
important interests he nevertheless finds it possible to take a promi- 
nent part in the social and fraternal life of the community, and holds mem- 
bership in several orders and fraternal organizations. He is a member of 
Bellevue Lodge, No. 530, Free and Accepted Masons ; of Bellevue Chapter, 
Ko. 287, Ro3'al Arch Masons ; Tankred Commandery, No. 48, Knights 
Templar ; the Pittsburgh Commandery, Thirty-second Degree, and the As- 
syria Temple. He is also a member of the Colonel Bayn Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. In politics Dr. Snyder is a member of the Demo- 
cratic party, and takes a keen and intelligent interest in all questions whether 
of local or general application. Dr. Snyder is a member of the Reformed 
Church, attending the church at Avalon, and Mrs. Snyder is a member of 
tlie Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Snyder married, January 23, 1897, Mabel Claire Lutz, a native of 
Tiffin, Ohio, where she was born, in 1869. Mrs. Snyder is the daughter of 
lohn and Elizabeth Lutz. There have been no children of this union. 



William Teuteberg comes of a family representative of 
TEUTEBERG the best German-American character, which has brought 

to the cosmopolitan citizenship of the United States a 
leaven of its own peculiar virtues, unswerving perseverance and industry. 
(I) His parents were George and Charlotte (Baker) Teuteberg. both 
natives of Germany, who were married in the "Fatherland" and later 
emigrated from there I0 the United States, bringing their family with them. 
George Teuteberg was a farmer and gardener, and upon their arrival in 
this country settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Here his wife died in 
1859, whereupon he removed to Emsworth, Pennsylvania, his own death 
occurring in the latter place in the year 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Teuteberg 
were the parents of twelve children in all. though but two of them, Wil- 
liam, of whom further, and Lewis Teuteberg, of Chicago, still survive. 

dl) William Teuteberg, son of George and Charlotte (Baker) Teute- 
berg. was born July 2, 1825, at Hanover, Germany, and there passed his 
childhood up to the age of fourteen years. In 1839, however, his parents 
migrated to the United States and brought William with them, and from 
that time on he lived in Pittsburgh and there received his education. He 
also found employment, driving the tow horses on the canal, being intrusted 
with the mail barges under Bingliam. He later took up his father's old 



WESTERN PEXXSYLVAXIA 555 

occupation of farming, and in 1851 came to fJhio township, Allegheny 
county, the present site of the town of Emsworth. Here Mr. Teuteberg 
bought considerable property, including that where Emsworth now stands. 
-Mr. Teuteberg is a member of the Re]ndjlican party and has always taken 
a keen interest in the political cjucstions of the day. He is a member of the 
Ben Avon, Pennsylvania, Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Teuteberg married, h'ebruary 16, 1854, Dorothea lieckcrl, a native 
of Germany, where she was born July 16. 183 1, her death occurring .August 
20. 1868, at Emsworth. Mr. and Mrs. Teuteberg were the parents of five 
ciiildren, as follows: Magdalena, born January 4, 1855; Catherine, liorii 
June 26, 1859; Matilda, born January 19, 1863; Frederick, of whom further; 
William Jr., born March 26, 1868. 

(IIP) Frederick Teuteberg, fourth child (jf William and Dorothea 
(Beckert) Teuteberg, was born June i, 1866, in Emsworth, Pennsylvania. 
He has spent his life in his native place and at the present time (1914) 
resides on the old Teuteberg homestead witli his father. He was educated 
in the local public schools, and upon completing his studies retired to the 
management of the home farm under his father. In the year 1904 he en- 
gaged in a mercantile business, and in this has had a high degree of success, 
his establishment being located at No. 174 Beaver Road, Emsworth. He 
is a member of the Republican party, and with his wife a member of the 
1 'resbyterian Church. 

Frederick Teuteberg married (first) June 4. 1896, Emma Diehl, a 
daughter of Charles and Christena Diehl, of Pittsburgh, in which city she 
was born, December 23, 1866. By his first wife Mr. Teuteberg had three 
children, as follows: William Diehl, born May 17, 1898; Frederick Charles, 
born August 6, 1900; Luella Christine, born February 20, 1903. Mrs. 
Teuteberg died February 2, 1910. ^Ir. Teuteberg married (second) Octo- 
ber 19, 19 1 2, Amelia E. Beilstein, also of Emsworth, born in Allegheny, 
North Side, Pittsburgh. Mrs. Teuteberg is the daughter of Charles and 
Henrietta (Shreiner) Beilstein. Of this union there is one child, a son, 
Karl John, born September 30, 19 13. 



John Henry Hunt is a fine type of the strong and dominant 
HUNT race whose colonization of this country in the early days laid 
the foundation upon which, as upon rock, the subsequent de- 
\ elopment of our civilization has rested. 

His parents were John and Jane (Steer) Hunt, both natives of Eng- 
land, who came to the Ignited States in 1873, bringing with them a family 
of children, and settling in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where they made their 
first home. Mr. Hunt found work as a laborer to support himself and 
family. In 1884 he came to Emsworth, Pennsylvania, and still later re- 
moved to Akron,* Ohio, where he is now living at the age of seventy-eight 
years. Mrs. Hunt died, however, during their residence in Emsworth, in 
1908, at the age of fifty-two years. To them were born eleven children, as 
follows : John Henry, of whom further : Eliza, Ada, Albert. Caroline. 



556 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

]\Iary. h^lora. Ida, Alice. William, Anna. Mr. Hunt was a member of the 
Republican party and keenly interested in all political questions whether of 
local or general bearing. He and his wife were members of the Episcopal 
Church and reared their children in that persuasion. 

John Henry Hunt was born April 25. 1866, in Sheffield, England, and 
passed the early years of his childhood there. When he was a lad of but 
seven, his parents brought him with them on tlieir removal to the United 
States, and he received his education in the public schools of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, where he lived until reaching the age of eighteen years. At 
the time of his parents' removal to Emsworth, the young man accompan'ed 
them, but did not share their later move to Akron, Ohio. He had in the 
meantime established himself firmly in a general contracting business In 
Emsworth, and in that town has continued to live to the present time, doing 
a highly successful business. He has prospered greatly and now owns a 
large amount of property, and is a man of substance and importance in the 
community. Mr. Hunt is active in politics in his town, and is a member of 
the Republican party. Both he and Mrs. Hunt are members of the Episcopal 
Church, as are also the members of his numerous family. Mr. Hunt is 
one of that sturdy company of men, of which this country presents so many 
examples, who, beginning with little, have made their way in the world by 
dint of their own efforts and ability, and reached a prominent position in the 
life of their communities. In 1912 he built a handsome house for himself 
and his family in Emsworth, and there resides at the present time. 

Mr. Hunt married, July 2, 1889, Barbara Stingert, a native of Alle- 
gheny. Pennsylvania, where she was born in 1870. Mrs. Hunt is the 
daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Smith) Stingert, of Allegheny. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have been born nine children, as follows: Ella, Walter, 
Edith, Emma, Harry, Ralph, Ida, Raymond, deceased, and Sarah. 



Thomas O. Jones is descended on his father's side of the house 
JONES from a family representative of the best type of the Welsh 

people, which has contributed a leaven of its own peculiar vir- 
tues to the composite citizenship of the United States, the virtues of sturdy 
endurance and a strong moral and religious sense. 

(I) His paternal grandfather, who also bore the name of Thomas O. 
Jones, was born in Wales, but migrated in company with his parents to the 
United States when only eight years old. He was a very active and enter- 
prising man and had much to do with the early development of the mining 
industry in the Pittsburgh region. He was the first, indeed, to open a coal 
business on the "South Side" of Pittsburgh, this epoch marking event 
occurring about the year 1850. After a successful career he retired in his 
old age to Evansburg, Pennsylvania, where he finally died. He married 
Margaret Davis, and among their children was John T., of whom further. 

(II) John T. Jones, son of Thomas O. Jones, was born in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and there educated in the local public schools. Upon leaving 
school he at once entered his father's business of coal mining, fir'^t in con- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 557 

nection with the Ormsljy Works, and later with the Lyle Coal Company 
at Camden, Pennsylvania. He remained in the latter place until the year 
1877, when he opened a mine at Wehster, Pennsylvania, operating the same 
until the great flood of iHHH, which devastated the surrounding region. 
After this catastrophe he went to Courtney, Pennsylvania, and secured em- 
ployment with the J. S. Neil Coal Company as superintendent of their 
mines at that point. From this time on he made a numher of connections 
with diiiferent companies, always in the same line of business, going from 
place to place as his interests led him. He was as.sociated with the Little 
Redstone Coal Company, organized in 1899 or 1900, both as a stockholder 
and as general superintendent of their mines, which were located near 
Fayette City. From there he went to Pitt.sburgh, to fill the position of su- 
perindent of The River Coal Company, and in 1904 went to Coal Center, 
Pennsylvania, and was associated with the Jones and Laughlin Mines at 
thaf point, and finally was with the United Coal Company, in whose service 
he was killed. He married Anna Livingston, a daughter of Joseph Living- 
ston, of Lebanon. Pennsylvania, where he was a .successful farmer. The 
wife of Joseph Livingston was a Miss McGown, a daughter of the first 
settlers of McKeesport, her mother having been a Miss McKee. To J. T. 
and Anna (Livingston) Jones, were born five children, one of whom was 
Thomas O., of whom further. 

(HI) Thomas O. (2) Jones, son of John T. and Anna (Living.ston) 
Jones, was born March 9, 1871. at Camden, Pennsylvania. He received the 
elementary portion of his education at the public schools of Pittsburgh, and 
graduated from the Pittsburgh Central High School. He then attended 
Dufif's Business College, the well known commercial school in that city, 
where he took a business course. Upon completing these studies he secured 
at once a position at clerk in the ofifice of W. K. Gallespie, a large whole- 
sale grocer of Pittsburgh, with whom, however, he remained but a short 
time, leaving to accept an offer of a position with the D. and F. S. Welty 
Company, a firm dealing in the wdiolesale carpet and wall paper trade. After 
some time at this work Mr. Jones decided to engage in business for himself, 
and with his naturally enterprising nature he went to work at once to put 
his determination into practical effect. Taking a partner, he opened a gen- 
eral merchandise establishment in Fayette City, Pennsylvania, his firm 
being known as the Jones Supply Company. It later became necessary to 
terminate this business, and Mr. Jones thereupon went to Tarentum. Penn- 
sylvania, which has ever since been his home. In Tarentum he secured a 
position with the Tarentum Hardware Company, and in November. 1898. 
became manager of the concern. The business of the company growing 
largely under the able direction of affairs by Mr. Jones, it was decided to 
incorporate, and in 1910 this step was carried out. Mr. Jones becoming 
secretary and treasurer. His success in the affairs of the Tarentum Hard- 
ware Company was such as to attract universal attention in the business 
life of the town, and his obvious abilities were soon called into requisition 
in a number of quarters. As a result his associations are now numerous 



558 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

in that region of Pennsylvania. He is the president of the Leechburg 
Hardware Company of Leechburg, Pennsylvania, president of the Free- 
port Clay Products Company of Freeport, Pennsylvania, vice-president of 
the American Hardware and Supply Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, vice-president of the Tarentum Land and Improvement Company of 
Tarentum, secretary and treasurer of the Clinton Mineral Springs Com- 
pany of Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, and a director in the Tarentum Savings 
and Trust Company of Tarentum and of the Fayette Bargain Company 
of Fayette City. He is, in short, one of the most prominent figures in the 
business, financial and industrial world in that part of the state. He does 
not confine his activities to the business world exclusively, however, but 
takes a conspicuous part in the general life of the town, and is a popular 
figure with all those who come in contact with him. He is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and is interested in the social 
life of the town. 

Mr. Jones married, January 31, 1903, Bessie I. Anderson, a daughter 
of Thomas J. and Elizabeth M. Anderson, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania, 
where she was born July 23, 1882. To Mr. and Mrs. Jones have been 
born four children, two sons and two daughters, as follows: Thomas A., 
Mary Louise, Mabel Livingston. Richard Warren. Mr. Jones and his 
wife are members of the Presbyterian Church and in that persuasion are 
rearing their children. 



In every community, however small, there are to be found 
GEPHARDT a number of foreign-born citizens, who rank among the 

best and most highly honored residents, and in the case 
of the late John Gephardt he was no exception to the rule. He was born 
in Bavaria, Germany, March 23, 1843, died August 9, 1896, killed by light- 
ning, son of John George and Anna Magdalena (Strobel) Gephardt. 

John George Gephardt was born in Germany, in which country his 
parents were born and settled. He emigrated to the United States, and in 
1852 located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, removing from there to a farm 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania, and subsequently changed his place of 
residence to another farm in the same county. He was a member of the 
Lutheran Church, and a Republican in politics. He was killed by a train. 
March 3, 1885. His wife, Anna Magdalena Gephardt, survived him many 
years, passing away September 14, 1905. Their children were: John, of 
whom further; Katharine, deceased; Margaret, deceased, was the wife of 
John Henry, of Colorado. 

John Gephardt attended the schools of Pittsburgh and Butler county, 
Pennsylvania, after which he served an apprenticeship at the trade of shoe- 
maker. He was the proprietor of a shoe store in Leechburg, Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, for thirteen years, and upon his retirement from active 
business pursuits returned to the homestead farm in Butler county, Penn 
sylvania, in 1886, of which he was the owner, and which he cultivated and 
improved. He was successful in business, being progressive in his ideas, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 559 

trustworthy in his transactions, and by carefully attending to the wants and 
wishes of his customers gained their good will and steady patronage. He 
was a member of the Lutheran Ciuirch, in which his widow also holds 
membership, and he gave his allegiance to the candidates of the Republican 
party. 

Mr. Gephardt married, November 30, 1873, Hannah Sophia Cjoering, 
born in Germany, July 11, 1850, daughter of Henry and Hannah fWolfromj 
Goering, both natives of Germany, from whence they emigrated to this 
country, settling on a farm in J'utler county, Pennsylvania, in 1854. He 
was a wheelwright by trade, which occupation he followefl for many years. 
He and his wife were members of the Lutheran Church. Their chiklren 
were: Henrietta; Christian, deceased; Hannah, deceased; Christian; I*"red- 
cricka ; Hannah Sophia, mentioned above ; Theresa, deceased. Mr. Goer- 
ing died August 23, 1887, he having survived his wife many years, her 
death occurring July 23, 1878. Mr. and Mrs. Gephardt were the parents 
of eight children: i. Anna, born October 11, 1874, died July 20. 1881. 2. 
Charles Albert, born November 12, 1876; a resident of Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania; married Elizabeth Fhreeling; children: Clarence G., 
William E., Charles. 3. Ellery Alexander, born November 18, 1877; a resi- 
dent of Brackenridge, Pennsylvania ; married Margaret Lunderstead ; child. 
Donald E. 4. Hannah Theresa, born August 24, 1879; married in Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania, May 21, 1907, Edward William Whiteside, born in Clarion 
county, Pennsylvania, reared in Tennessee, killed in the Sheet Mill, Novem- 
ber II, 1907; one child, Edna Theresa, born April 8, 1908. 5. Ralph W., 
born June 5, 1881, died March 17, 1885. 6. Ellen A., born October 2t,. 
1883; married Cyrus Daniel Whitemire ; children: Ralph A., Irene A. and 
Eugene C, twins, Clyde A., Edward J. 7. Emma Matilda, born January 
18, 1887; resides at home. 8. Laura i\L, born February 28. 1894, resides at 
home. On August 18, 1904, Mrs. Gephardt took up her residence in 
Tarentum, purchasing a house on East Sixth avenue, wdiere the family have 
since resided. They are well and favorably known in the community, and 
have a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. 



George B. King comes on his father's side of a family representa- 
KING tive of the best type of Irish character, which has brought to 

the composition of the complex citizenship of the L^nited States 
a leaven of its own peculiar virtues, a strong practical sense, enterprise and 
indomitable courage. His mother's ancestry was originally of Scotch origin. 
but has lived for so many years in Pennsylvania as to have become thor- 
oughly identified with the life and associations of that state. 

His paternal grandfather was John King, who was born and passed 
his entire life in Ireland, and there, also, was born his son. John King, the 
second, the father George B. King. This young man. however, influenced 
by the accounts of the freedom and opportunity to be found in the great 
republic of the Western Hemisphere, decided not to remain in his native 



56o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Upon his arrival in this country, he made his way directly to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, later to Harpers Ferry, then to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 
then back to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he spent the latter part of his 
life and died. He first found employment as a moulder in an iron foundry, 
being later promoted to the position of manager of the concern, a post 
which he continued to hold until his death. He was extremely capable in 
his work and made himself a man of substance and prominence in his 
adopted community. He married Martha Burket, a native of Storriestown. 
Pennsylvania, where she was born, a daughter of Jacob and Martha 
(Thompson) Burket, old residents and natives of the region about Storries- 
town, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Burket was a farmer and also plied the 
carpenter's trade. Mr. and Mrs. King Sr. were the parents of nine children, 
cf whom George B. was the sixth. 

George B. King was born March 31, 1863, in Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania. He obtained some schooling in the Monongahela City, Penn- 
sylvania, public schools, but is, in a large measure, self-educated, being 
naturally a student, and having taken up the study of chemistry since his 
marriage. In very earl)' youth he became greatly interested in decoration, 
from the age of eleven years giving his time to work in that line, par- 
ticularly to fresco painting, which he devoted himself to from that age up to 
the time of his fortieth year, in 1902. During this period he resided, from 
1883 on, in the "North Side," Pittsburgh, contracting for the painting of 
frescos in that neighborhood, and for decorative work generally. He was 
engaged in this business for eighteen years, but in 1902 he removed to Mill- 
vale, Pennsylvania, where he opened a mercantile department store, and 
gave up his former work. In the later venture he has been highly success- 
ful, and is now a prominent figure in the community, which continues to 
this day his home. 

Mr. King's activities are not confined to his personal and business in- 
terests. On the contrary, he takes a conspicuous part in the life of the 
town generally, particularly in the social and fraternal circles, and is a 
member of the Knights of the Maccabees; Lodge No. 45, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons ; Zerubbabel Chapter, No. 162, Royal Arch Masons ; Tan- 
cred Commandery, No. 48, Knights Templar ; Pennsylvania Consistory, 
Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret, all located in the city of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. While Mr. King has always been a member of the Repub- 
lican party and a staunch advocate of that party's principles, and while he 
has always taken a keen and vital interest in all political questions, whether 
of local or general significance, he nevertheless has never aspired to political 
distinction and has consistently refused all ofifers of public office made to 
him. 

Mr. King married, November 27, 1883, Catherine Kress, a native of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she was born in the "North Side.'' Mrs. 
King was the daughter of Valentine, born in Ricker, Germany, and Theresa 
( Hohman) Kress, born in Flieden, Germany, but married in the United 
States. To Mr. and Mrs. King have been born six children, as follows: 



WESTP:RN I'EWSYLVAiVIA 561 

Richard A., a graduate from the medical department of the University of 
Pittsburgh, and now a practicing physician in the "North Side," Pittsburgh, 
Claude L., a graduate of the Pennsylvania State College, and now a civil 
engineer whose work just at present takes him to Cincinnati, Ohio, though 
his home is in Pittsburgh; Arthur J. C, now a butcher in Pittsburgh; 
Raphael P., now a brick layer in Pittsburgh, formerly in the drug business; 
Garnetta R., died at the age of nine and a half years; Camillus C, now 
living witii his parents at home. Mr. King is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and Mrs. King a member of the Catholic Church, and in 
that persuasion their family of children have been reared. 



Despite the fact that the immigrant ancestor of this line of 
MORRIS Morrises came to the United States nearly a century ago, to 

the present day the history of the line is closely intricateti 
witli the homeland, England, because of the fact that after an American 
residence of more than a quarter of a century Robert Morris returned to 
England, in which country the majority of his children were born. An- 
cient English records make frequent mention of the name Morris, and 
members thereof were once known as lords of a manor in Surrey county, 
England. Walter Morris, a younger son of his generation, married a lady 
of noble birth, and one of his children was Robert, of whom further. An- 
other was George, who was first a lieutenant in the English navy and was 
later raised to the rank of captain. The coat-of-arms formerly employed by 
the family was, in non-heraldric terms, a black crow against a background 
of gray. 

(II) Robert Morris, son of Walter Morris, was for many years a 
writing master in London, his school and office being at No. 4 Breams 
Building, Chancery Lane, London. He and his wife were members of the 
Church of England. About 1852 he set out upon a voyage to the United 
States to join his son, Robert, who had preceded him to that land, but died 
en route, being given a sea burial. 

(III) Robert (2) Morris, son of Robert (i) Morris, was born in 
Guilford, Surrey county, England, October 31, 1805. died June 21, 1866. 
Having been reared and educated in his native land, in the year that he 
attained his majority he immigrated to the United States, at once establish- 
ing in the grocery business. At this time he took out his first papers 
toward becoming a subject of the United States, and on January 17. 1835. 
received his naturalization papers. His store was on Federal street. Alle- 
gheny City, Pennsylvania, the site now occupied by Boggs & Buhl, and from 
its inception his business was a success almost beyond precedent, so that 
within the short space of a few years he was at the head of the largest 
wholesale grocery house in the city of Pittsburgh. His dealings were first 
under his own name, the house later trading as Morris & Haworth. While he 
was in business in this place his home was on North avenue, Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania, and prior to 1858 he withdrew from all connections he 
had formed in his new home and returned to his native land, making his 



562 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

home in Norwich, Norfolk county, England, where he and his wife lived 
until their deaths. For a time after returning to England he owned a 
retail grocery store in Dover, England, but soon disposed of this and retired 
completely from the business world, his career having been but a succes- 
sion of successes. He married Maria Thrower, born at Saxlingham, 
Norfolk county, England, September 17, 1810, died at Norwich, Norfolk 
county, England, January to, 1881, her father dying in young manhood, her 
mother coming to the United States to make her home with her daughter, 
^laria. Children of Robert and Maria (Thrower) Morris: i. Frances, 
married William Symonds, a retired commercial traveler, and lives in 
Yorkshire, England. 2. Maria, born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried Robert George Bagshaw, and resides in Norwich, England, where he 
was at one time sherifif. 3. Robert Riches, born in Allegheny City, Pennsyl- 
vania, died at Crafton, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1889; traveling auditor 
in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad ; married Anna Saylor. 4. 
W'alter, of whom further. 5. Georgianna, married Sidney W. Cook, a re- 
tired lace manufacturer; resides in Hastings. England; he is a son of an 
ex-mayor of Southampton, England. 

(IV) Walter (2) Morris, son of Robert (2) and Maria (Thrower) 
Morris, was born in London, England, May 6, 1846, while his parents, at 
that time American citizens, were visiting the homeland. His early educa- 
tion was obtained under the direction of a private tutor in Norfolk, Eng- 
land, and he remained in England until 1862, when he came to the United 
States. On November 7, of that year, he enlisted in Walling's Battery of 
Light Artillery, and fought in all of the battles in which that battery was 
engaged from that time until the declaration of peace, the battery being 
assigned to duty in the southwest. He was mustered out of the military 
service of the United States, November 17, 1865, to enter its civil service, 
being a clerk in the war department for several months after leaving the 
army. In 1866 he came to Pittsburgh and became identified with the Pitts- 
burgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad, later severing his connection and 
embarking in the retail grocery business in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 

Being desirous of entering the insurance field, he in 1874 disposed of 
his grocery store and accepted a position as bookkeeper with the Allemannia 
Fire Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Two years later 
he resigned to accept the office of .secretary of the Citizens Insurance Com- 
pany of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a position he held until 1887. in which 
year he resigned to enter business independently, his loss a severe one to 
the heads of the Citizens Insurance Company, from whom he bore with 
him the best of good wishes for his future success. Forming a partnership 
with C. L. Straub, they conducted general fire insurance transactions under 
the firm name of Straub & Morris, representing several well-known and 
highly reputable companies. In 1893 the partnership was dissolved and for 
seven years Mr. Morris engaged in the same line alone, in 1900 accepting the 
secretaryship of the Armenia Insurance Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. This company in May, 1901, re-insured all their business with the 



VVKSTICRX l'KX.\SYLVANIy\ 563 

Westchester Fire Insurance Coniijany oi New York, with whom Mr. Morris 
continued as manager, an office that he most capably filled until his fleath, 
May ro, 191 1. Almost his entire life having been ]>as.sefl in connection 
with the fire insurance business, there were few men oi whom it could be 
said that their knowledge of and cx])ericnce in the business was greater 
than his. He was of strong and vigorous mentality, jxjssessed the faculty 
of retaining innumerable facts and figures, fresh in his well-storerl mind. 
and the very main-spring of the activities of any enterjjrise with which he 
Vv'as connected, fie was tcmi)erale and reasonable in planning, fiecisive and 
forceful in execution, and in event of miscarriage of his plans never sought 
to evade the responsibility for his error, while in the success of a carefully 
conceived campaign his gratification was entirely inward, his modest bearing 
giving to those unfamiliar with the facts of the case no intimation of the 
achieved victory. In 1887 Mr. Morris moved to Ingram, Pennsylvania, 
purchasing a house at Xo. 94 Prosi)ect avenue, there living until his fleath, 
the present home of his widow being in that place. He was a staunch Re- 
publican politically, was a member of Allegheny Lodge. Xo. 223, Free and 
Accepted Masons, was jiast commander of General Hayes Post, Xo. 3, 
Grand Army of the Repu])lic. and with his wife held membership in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church of the Xativity. of Crafton, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Morris married. May 9, 1867, i\Iary E. Cowling, born on Federal 
street, Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side). Pennsylvania, daughter 
of James and Emily (Leach) Cowling. James Cowling was a son of John 
and Mary (Harrison) Cowling, who were born, lived and died in London. 
England, both John Cowling and his father having been tailors to the Blue- 
coat School in London. Emily was a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Leach, her father a farmer at Hempnall, England, having inherited a large 
tract of land from Robert Sporl. for whom he was at one time farm man- 
ager. A brother of John Leach, William Leach, was the owner of a hotel 
named the "Rampant Horse" in Norwich. England. He was a man of 
wealth, prominent in local affairs, and kept a fine pack of hounds, to which 
he and his friends frequently rode. James Cowling was born in London. 
England, January 30. 1810. died in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. October 3. 
1872. He was reared in his native land and there learned the tailor's trade, 
and in 1832 was married, the ceremony being performed in the Hempnall 
(liurch of England, residing in London for two years thereafter. In 1834 
he immigrated to the United States making his home and engaging in busi- 
ness as a merchant tailor in Allegheny City. Pennsylvania, living first on 
Federal street, and later on North avenue. He moved to Beaver Falls, 
Pennsylvania, in 1859, and there was an ice dealer until his death. He 
enlisted in the Seventy-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania \'olunteer Infantry, 
his officers being Captain Irish and Colonel Neglev. antl was discharged 
honorably for disability after having been in the service for ten months. 
during wdiich time he was in action at Murfreesboro and Pittsburgh Land- 
ing (Shiloh). He married Emily Leach, born in Hempnall. Norfolk county, 
England, February 15. 1810. died in November. 1869. Children of James 



564 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

and Emily (Leach) Cowling: i. Emily, married Isaac Warren, and lives 
in New Brighton, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary E., of previous mention, married 
Walter Alorris. 3. Eleanor, married Thomas Matanle, deceased, and lives 
in Elmira, New York. 4. Maria, married Samuel J. Bennett, deceased, and 
lives with a daughter, Mrs. George Carruthers, of Beaver Falls, Pennsyl- 
vania. Children of Walter and Mary E. (Cowling) Morris: i. Robert 
James, born April 3, 1869, died August 17. 1898, unmarried; was for a 
time engaged in business with his father. 2. Jessie Emily, born December 
30, 1870, lives at home, unmarried. 3. Walter C, born November 24, 1873; 
conducts his father's business in partnership with his brother, Charles 
Weaver, as Walter Morris' Sons, their office in the Commonwealth Build- 
ing. Pittsburgh ; married Bertha Hannan, of Pittsburgh ; his home is at No. 
29 Lincoln avenue, Crafton, Pennsylvania. 4. Mary Elizabeth, born June 2, 
1878, married C. C. Gray, vice-president and treasurer of the Detroit Insu- 
lated Wire Company ; resides in Detroit, Michigan. 5. Charles Weaver, born 
April 20, 1885, one of the firm of Walter IMorris' Sons, lives at home, un- 
married. 



The Dunbar family of Scotland, with which this line in 
DUNBAR Pennsylvania is connected through the branch of the name 

that found residence in Ireland, is one of notable history, 
holding a prominent position among the Scottish families of noble achieve- 
ment. 

(I) He of the line with whom this chronicle opens is James Dunbar, 
who when eighteen years of age left his home in Belfast, Ireland, and ar- 
rived in America at about the close of the war for independence. He 
settled in Washington county, Pennsylvania, there owning many acres of 
land, a part of which he cleared, and there passed the remainder of his life. 
He married Mary McConnell, and had children: i. James, died in Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania. 2. Robert, died in Wa.-^hington county. Penn- 
sylvania. 3. John, died near Steubenville, Ohio. 4. Thomas, died in Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania. 5. Samuel, of whom further. 6. William, 
died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 7. Mary, married Joseph Wal- 
lace, and died in Allegheny county. Pennsylvania. 8. Jane, married a Mr. 
Black, and died in Ohio. 9. Martha, married James Brimmer, and died in 
Washington county. Pennsylvania. 10. Joseph, died in Iowa. 

fll) Samuel Dunbar, son of James and Mary (McConnell) Dunbar, 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, October 27, 181 7, died in 
Smith township. Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1855. He was reared 
to manhood on the home farm, and after his marriage purchased land in 
Smith township where he farmed and conducted stock raising operations 
until his death, resulting from an attack of fever. He was politically a 
Democrat, and with his wife held membership in the Presbyterian Church. 
He married Rebecca Van Eman. born in Washington county. Pennsylvania, 
March 4, 1820, who now lives on the home farm near Burgettstown, Penn- 
sylvania, aged nearly ninety-five years, never having married a second time. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVy\NIA 565 

She is a daughter of Garrett and Racliel (Logan) Van Eman, botli of her 
parents natives of Washington county, Pennsylvania, after their marriage 
settling on Pigeon creek in that county, and later moving to Burgeltstown 
where they died. In both places he owned and farmed land. Both were 
members of the Raccoon Presbyterian Ciiurcii, in the organization of which 
he was an elder. Children of (iarrett and Rachel (Logan) Van Eman: 
I. James Adams, died unmarried in California, aged nearly ninety years, 
having journeyed to that state in i<S52 among the gold seekers. 2. Rebecca, 
of previous mention, married Samuel Dunbar. 3. Amelia, married Scott 
Riddle, and died in Ohio. 4. Margaret, unmarried, died September 10, 1914, 
aged nearly eighty-nine years, near Burgettstown, Pennsylvania. 5. Rachel, 
married Daniel Duncan, and died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Isabel P., married William Dunbar, and resides in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania. 7. Mary Jane, married Lilburn Shipley, and died in Burgettstown, 
Pennsylvania. 8. Hannah V., married James Stevenson, and lives near 
Burgettstown. 9. Hugh Lee, a justice of the peace of Michigan Bluflf, 
California. 10. Garrett Scott, at one time a United States commissioner 
of Oklahoma, now lives retired in Jennings in that state, the owner of a 
great deal of land, having during his active life been a hardware merchant. 
Children of Samuel and Rebecca (Van Eman) Dunbar: i. William V., 
married Rea J. Wilson, and lives on the home farm. 2. James Garrett, of 
whom further. 3. Mary B., unmarried, and lives with her mother. 

(HI) James Garrett Dunbar, son of Samuel and Rebecca (Van Eman) 
Dunbar, was born near Burgettstown, Pennsylvania, September 20, 1852. 
After attending the public schools he completed his studies in the Frank- 
fort Springs Academy. For several years he taught school in that locality, 
and was then employed on the home farm. In 1890 he became proprietor 
of a furniture store in East Liverpool, Ohio, but soon afterward moved 
to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and there established as a real estate dealer. 
That has since been his field of efifort. and he has conducted successful 
operations in that city, his home having been in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. 
since 1901. His reputation in the business world is the most worthy, all of 
his dealings having been conducted in a fair and honorable manner that 
could leave no room for dissatisfaction or reproach. The Masonic Order 
is the fraternal society to which Mr. Dunbar belongs, his membership being 
in Burgettstown Lodge, No. 454, Free and Accepted Masons, while with 
l.is wife he is a communicant of the Presbyterian Church. He is allied with 
no political party, his judgment as to candidates being his only guide at the 
polls. 

Mr. Dunbar married, in 1901. Annie B. Galbraith. born in Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of IMatthew and Phoebe (Keys) Galbraith. 
They are the parents of one daughter, Annetta Rebecca, born October 27. 
1902, exactly eighty-five years after the birth of her grandfather. Samuel 
Dunbar. 



566 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The year 1771 was the date of the arrival in Young township, 
LEARD Indiana county, Pennsylvania, of Zachariah Leard, who came 

thither from Ireland, his birth-place, his home in the northern 
part of that island. He was the founder of a family, the line herein re- 
corded continuing through his son John. 

(II) John Leard, son of Zachariah Leard, was a native of Young 
township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, and married Mary Elder, one of 
his sons being Zachariah, of whom further. 

(III) Zachariah (2) Leard, son of John and Mary (Elder) Leard, was 
born in Young township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, January 3, 1823, 
died on his seventy-seventh birthday. He was educated in the common 
schools of the day, in young manhood mastering the surveyor's profession 
through his own efiforts and continuing in its practice during his active 
years. In addition to his work in this line he owned and cultivated a farm, 
always devoting a part of his time to agricultural pursuits. He held numer- 
ous positions in the public service, among them the office of school director, 
and was frequently impressed by his neighbors in the preparation of con- 
tracts, papers of sale, and other legal documents, although he persistently 
refused the office of justice of the peace. A thorough knowledge of legal 
procedure and a strict and unbending sense of honor were the factors that 
determined his appointment as executor in the settlement of numerous 
estates, all of which he closed in a prompt and business-like manner, to the 
satisfaction of all concerned. He married Jane Kelly, born in White town- 
ship, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Meek Kelly, a native of 
White township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, his wife, a Miss Moore- 
head, born in the same locality. Meek Kelly, son of James Kelly, was a 
surveyor by profession, and about 1836 was a member of the Pennsylvania 
senate, a Democrat in political faith. Children of Zachariah and Jane 
(Kelly) Leard: Sarah A., Meek Kelly, of whom further; Mary J. 

(lY) Meek Kelly Leard, son of Zachariah (2) and Jane (Kelly) 
Leard, was born in Young township, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, April 
8, 1856. He was educated in the public schools, and as a youth began 
farming, operating a tract of two hundred and twenty-six acres until 1910, 
his agricultural activities general in nature. In that year Mr. Leard moved 
to Tarentum, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and became a member of 
the firm of Moser & Hough, the name of which was changed one year 
later to the Hough. Leard Lumber Company. Mr. Leard becoming secretary 
and treasurer. This is the capacity in which he is now connected with this 
prosperous and thriving concern, his administration of the duties of his 
offices exact and able. While a resident of Blacklick township, Indiana 
county. Pennsylvania, Mr. Leard took an active interest in public affairs, 
and for nine years was a member of the township school board. Always a 
loyal Republican, he was for two terms a memlier of the state legislature, 
sitting in that body from 1899 to 1903. He is a citizen of public-spirited 
and progressive principles, and as well as becoming prominent in the busi- 
ness field of Tarentum has become a welcome addition to all branches of 



WESTERN PEN X SYLVAN I A 567 

community life. With his wife he is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Mr. Leard married, in 1910, Mary E. Pownell, born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania. 



Emil Maurhoff was born in Hanover, Germany, and 
MAURIIOFF after an excellent preparatory education was sent to a 
university in his native land, and was graduated from 
this with the degree of Civil Engineer. He followed the calling of sur- 
veying in America, and laid out Saxonburg, Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1821, residing there for the remainder of his life. He married Johanna 
Pollert, also born in Germany, daughter of Pollert, who was a silver- 
smith in Germany, and came to the United States about 1820. At first 
he made his home in North Carolina, from whence he went to Germantown, 
Philadelphia, and finally settled permanently in Saxonburg, where his death 
occurred. 

(H) Emil E. Maurhoff, son of Emil and Johanna ( Pollert j Maurhoff, 
was born in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, and received an excellent education 
in Witherspoon Institute, and later became a civil engineer. He commenced 
practicing his profession in that part of the state, and shortly after his mar- 
riage removed to Pittsburgh, where he remained until 1877, then to Saxon- 
burg, and in 1894 to Brackenridge, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where 
he is still living, and is still engaged in the same line of business. He served 
as school director in Saxonburg, and as borough engineer in Brackenridge. 
He was formerly a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
is now a member of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. Mr. 
Maurhoff married Matilda Koegler, also born near Saxonburg, daughtei 
of John Koegler, w^ho during the gold fever of 1849 went to California, 
but met with shipwreck on his return in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Maurhoff 
have had children : Charles Herbert, of further mention : Franklin Walter, 
a bookkeeper; Annie E., a graduate nurse; Presley Albert Luther, was grad- 
uated from the Pennsylvania State College, and is now a civil engineer in 
Philadelphia. 

(Ill) Charles Herbert Maurhoff. son of Emil E. and Matilda (Koeg- 
ler) Maurhoff, was born on Locust street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 
23, 1871. He received a classical education in Thiel College. Greenville. 
Pennsylvania, and came to Brackenridge in 1890. He is secretary of the 
Brackenridge Estate, which originally covered the land now occupied by 
Tarentum, Brackenridge, and Natrona, and still holds that position. He 
and his family are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a member 
cf the Masonic Fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. 
Maurhoff married, in 1898, Lavena Eulalie Lelless, and they have children : 
Elinor Lucile and Howard Lelless. 



The American ancestor of this branch of the Edgar family is 

EDGAR Jacob Edgar, a native of Switzerland, who made settlement 

in the Cumberland Vallev, Pennsylvania, latter movins^ to Al- 



568 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

legheny county, Pennsylvania. He made his home in the latter locality 
about 1829, and for many years held the position of toll collector on the 
Butler Pike. Jacob Edgar married and had children : William ; Isaac, of 
whom further ; Barbara ; Belle, a resident of Kansas ; Ann ; Caroline ; Re- 
becca. 

(II) Isaac Edgar, son of Jacob Edgar, was born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and as a youth attended school in that locality. He retired 
from all business and public connections in 1899, failing sight making such 
a move necessary, and has since resided in Glenshaw, Pennsylvania. He 
spent three and one-half years in the Union army during the war between 
the states, a soldier in Company E. Sixty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, one year after his enlistment being made wagonmaster of the regi- 
ment, a position he held until he received his honorable discharge from the 
service. Mr. Edgar married Mary Louise Zimmerman, born in Ohio, 
daughter of John and Louise Zimmerman, her parents natives of Germany. 
Children of Isaac and Mary Louise (Zimmerman) Edgar: Isaac W., of 
whom further ; John, Charles, George, Catherine, Mary, Clara. 

(III) Isaac W. Edgar, son of Isaac and Mary Louise (Zimmerman) 
Edgar, was born in Glenshaw, A.llegheny county. Pennsylvania, in 1879. 
After finishing a course in the public schools of that place he was for nine 
years employed by the Pittsburgh wholesale dry goods house of Arbuthnot 
Stephenson Company, in 1904 purchasing the general store from the Mc- 
Millan estate. Since that time he has conducted general mercantile deal- 
ings in Glenshaw, his business a profitable one of considerable size. Since 
that date he has been likewise postmaster of Glenshaw. He is a communi- 
cant of the Presbyterian Church, and affiliates with the Masonic Order. Mr. 
Edgar married, in September, 1906, Anna M., daughter of Henry Ziegen- 
heim, of Glenshaw, Pennsylvania, and has two daughters, Catherine and 
Helen. 



The lists of the earliest pioneers of Fayette county, Penn- 
PORTER sylvania. contain the names of the parents of John Porter, 

grandfather of Robert Baird Porter, who came to that 
locality from the family home in the north of Ireland, settling on Dunlap's 
creek. John Porter was a native of Fayette county, and there married 
Rebecca Mason, becoming the father of a family, among his sons Moses 
B.. of whom further, and Charles, the latter speaker of the Pennsylvania 
legislature about 1835, afterward associate judge of Fayette county, serv- 
ing for many years with distinction and honor until old age compelled 
his retirement from this position. 

(II) Moses B. Porter, son of John and Rebecca (Mason) Porter, 
was born in 1797, and at his death had attained a good old age. Through- 
out his entire life he was a farmer, prospering in his calling, and was a 
man of influence and importance in his community. Under the old con- 
stitution of the state of Pennsylvania he was appointed to the office of 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 569 

justice of the peace, at a lime when that office was one of dif^nity and 
responsibility, and served thus f(jr many years, continuing for a few years 
after the office had been made an elective one. He married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Wilson, of Scotch-Irish descent, her father for many years 
ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church at his home in Fayette county. 
Among the children of Moses B. and Mary (Wilson) Porter were: i. 
Thomas W., a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, in which 
institution he was a classmate and roommate of James Ci. Blaine, sharing 
first honors with that talented statesman and remaining his close friend 
until death ; Thomas W. Porter became an attorney, studying law under 
Judge Buchanan, a well-known jurist, and was admitted to the bar of 
Greene county, also becoming editor of the Greene County Republican, \mh- 
lished at Waynesburg; his death occurred five years after his graduation, 
and James G. Blaine ever was a staunch friend of the family. 2. William 
J., a soldier in the Union army in the Civil War, surviving that conflict. 
3. Cyrus Alexander, a soldier in the Union army in the Civil War, lost a leg 
in that conflict and was so impaired in health by the hardships and ex- 
posure of life at the front that he suffered during his remaining years, 
although his death did not occur until long after the close of the war. 4. 
Robert Baird, of whom further. 

(Ill) Rev. Robert Baird Porter, son of Moses B. and Mary (Wilson) 
Porter, was born at Merrittsville, near the Henry Clay Pike, Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1847. His early education was ob- 
tained in Dunlap's Creek Academy, then one of the three preparatory 
institutions in Western Pennsylvania, and after the completion of his 
studies in that place he entered Washington and Jeft'erson College, en- 
rolling in 1865 as a member of the sophomore class and graduating in 
1868, fulfilling all of the requirements of the classical course. He re- 
turned to his home and was immediately offered a controlling position 
in the Dunlap's Creek Academy, the institution having just lost Profes- 
sor Sloan, the head of the academy, the board of trustees selecting Mr. 
Porter for the office. Accepting the offer of the board, he was im- 
mediately installed in authority, and for five terms of five months each 
taught in the academy, afterward having the deep pleasure and satisfaction 
of witnessing the successful and. in manv cases, brilliant careers of men 
whom he had taught as youths. After resigning from his connection 
with this institution, Mr. Porter matriculated at the Western Theological 
Seminary and was graduated therefrom in 1874, his first charge being at 
Senecaville, Ohio. He was subsequently pastor of churches at Fair- 
view. Hancock county. West \'irginia, and Rochester, Pennsylvania, then 
accepted a call from the Cross-Roads (Thurch in Pine township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, to the congregation of which he ministered until 
ill health caused his retirement in 1893. 

Since that year Rev. Mr. Porter has cultivated his one hundred acres 
of land in Pine township, Allegheny countv, and has taken a place as 



570 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

one of the foremost agriculturists, stock, swine and poultry raisers of 
the county. His entire tract is under close and excellent cutlivation, 
productive to a high degree, and thereon he has conducted numerous ex- 
periments with new grains. Fine Jersey cattle graze over his pastures, 
and he is the owner of .some thoroughbred swine that are unexcelled in 
the region and with which he has improved the grade of stock of the 
neighborhood to a noticeable degree. Through the crossing of two breeds 
of poultry, he has developed a flock of distinctive qualities, good pro- 
portions, and unusual laying capacity, which have attained considerable 
reputation among poultry fanciers. He devotes his entire time to his 
operations upon his land, and has the pride of the true agriculturist and 
fancier in successful experiments with seed and soil and with breed and 
blood. 

Rev. Mr. Porter holds the universal liking of his neighbors, and as 
a layman is as potent and active a factor for the right and good as when 
occupying the pulpit. His upright, unselfish life preaches eloquently the 
gospel he expounded from the pulpit, and he may always be found at the 
head of movements for moral and civil welfare. On occasions of local 
celebration he frequently accepts invitations to become the speaker of the 
day, and his appearance upon the platform unfailingly meets with a hearty 
and cordial reception, for time will never efface the memory of his min- 
istry in the Cross-Roads Church nor the fruits of his diligent labor. 

Rev. Mr. Porter, in his middle name, Baird, bore the patronymic of 
an uncle who was known as one of the greatest of American travelers. 
This uncle, perfectly familiar with his own hemisphere, directed his travels 
toward the eastern hemisphere, and could converse in seventeen languages, 
having learned by far the greater part of them by actual contact with the 
races using them as a medium of communication. He lectured extensively 
throughout this country, for many years giving a series of lectures during 
the winter term at the Western Theological Seminary, and possessed such 
a wonderful memory that, in spite of the numerous engagements that it 
was necessary for him to keep, he never made a note of such a date, never, 
during his long career upon the lecture platform, failing to meet but one 
such obligation. 

Rev. Mr. Porter married, in 1875. Celia G.. of Belle Vernon, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Lewis M. Speer, a coal operator and builder of river 
boats of large tonnage. Her maternal grandfather, Rev. Mr. Finley, was 
the second minister of the Presbyterian Church to take up work west 
of the Allegheny mountains. Children of Rev. Robert Baird and Celia 
O. f Speer) Porter: i. Mary P. 2. Anna A., deceased. 3. Edward. 4. 
George, deceased. 5. John, holds a clerical position in the United States 
army, now (1914) stationed on the Mexican border. 6. Wilbur, a resident 
of Valencia, Pennsylvania. 7. Arthur, lives at home. Mrs. Porter died 
May 3, 1913- 



WESTERN PEN' i\ SYLVAN! A 571 

George McCombs, of Scotch-Irish descent, wa^ born in 
McCOMBS Washington county, I'cinisylvania, was a cooper by trade, 
and died at the age of seventy-three years. He married 
Ly(Ha MillhoUand, also born in Washington county, Pennsylvania. Five 
children: I. 2. 3. Martha, Mary and George, triplets; Martha 
married James Cameron and they were the parents of seven children : 
Wilfred, James, William, Mary, Martha, Ella, Roint; Mrs. Cameron died 
at the age of seventy-seven years. Mary married Scott McCleary and they 
-were the parents of three children: Ella, Flora, Scott; Mrs. McCleary died 
at the age of twenty-eight years. George died shortly after birth. 4. Nancy, 
married Harmon Gebhart ; no issue; she died in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 
1893. 5. William M., of further mention. 

(H) William M. McCombs, son of George and Lydia (MillhoUand) 
McCombs, was born in New Castle, Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in 
1845, died in 1906. After his marriage he settled on South Side, Pitts- 
burgh, and lived there until his death. He was a tinner by occupation, 
and conducted a shop successfully for many years, changing the location 
as the demands of business made necessary. About fifteen years prior to 
his. death he added roofing and sheet metal business, also state contracting, 
in which he was equally successful. He was an active worker in the 
interests of the Republican party, and served as city councilman in the 
old Thirtieth ward for a number of years ; was school director in the same 
ward, and in later years became secretary of the school board of the old 
Twenty-ninth ward. He was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics, Improved Order of Hepta- 
sophs, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows, serving fifteen years as 
secretary of the last mentioned organization. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Bingham Street Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he was 
secretary of the board of trustees for twenty-five years, and was also 
superintendent of the Sunday school for a like number of years. Mr. 
McCombs married Sarah Ann Slicker, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
in 1847. fli^d in 1885. daughter of John and Mary Ann (Preston) Slicker. 
They had children : Mary, unmarried, lives at No. 335 North Craig 
street; Martha, unmarried, is a school teacher, and lives with Mary; Sarah. 
died in 1885. at the age of twelve years; Lydia. died in infancv; Alice. 
died in infancy; William P., of further mention; Kinsley, who died at the 
age of thirteen years. 

John Slicker, a native of Germany, was the son of John Schlicker. and 
after coming to this country, changed the spelling of the family name. He 
was a young man when he emigrated to the United States, and he settled 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was a glass worker all his life. He became 
a member of the firm of Stewart. Estep & Company, and died about 1870. 
He married Mary Ann Preston, born in Chester county. Pennsvlvania. of 
Quaker descent, and died in 1913. Her father, George Preston, was a 
soldier in the War of 1812. She was brought to Pittsburgh in early chil- 



572 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

hood, and became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Chil- 
dren : Sarah Ann, who married Mr. McCombs, as mentioned above ; 
Isabella, died in infancy; Mary Elizabeth, who died December 25, 1912, 
married Kinsley T. O'Connor ; Theodore Albert, a glass cutter, lives at 
Jeannette, Pennsylvania ; John Andrew, died in 1907 in Pittsburgh ; James 
Miles, died in Pittsburgh in 1887; Harry Preston, a glass cutter, lives 
at No. 106 South Twenty-third street. 

(Ill) William P. McCombs, son of William M. and Sarah Ann 
(Slicker) McCombs, was born at South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
January 3, 1884. He was educated in the public schools — the Humboldt 
School and the Birmingham schools, being graduated when about sixteen 
years of age. He then spent one year in the commercial department of 
the Pittsburgh High School, and supplemented this by a course at Al- 
legheny College, at Meadville. His first business position was that of 
clerk in the Anchor Rolling Mill, and in that he rose to the position of 
paymaster. He left this in order to assist his father in the roofing and 
sheet metal business, and after the death of his father conducted this 
business alone until 1910. In that year the business was incorporated with 
the following officers: Lewis F. Wentz, president; M. J. McCombs, sec- 
retary ; William P. McCombs, manager and treasurer. From small be- 
ginning this business has grown to huge proportions. They have branched 
out into the general roofing business, and have executed many of the 
most important contracts in the city of Pittsburgh. They employ from 
twenty-five to fifty men regularly, and among the buildings they have 
roofed are : The Sunday Tabernacle, St. Joseph's Hospital and the Ger- 
mania National Bank. They have now also branched out into the field 
of election specialties, and are noted for the quality of the wares they 
manufacture, their ballot boxes and voting booths being shipped all over 
the United States. Mr. McCombs served four years as a director of the 
Polithania State Bank. He is a staunch Republican, and has served as 
president of the board of health of Carrick ; was elected a councilman 
and entered upon his office, January i, 1914, and was chosen president of 
the council. He and his wife are members of the Bingham Street Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, in which he is secretary of the board of trustees. 
For a period of ten years he was assistant-superintendent of the Sunday 
school, and secretary of the Bingham Street Methodist Episcopal Cem- 
etery. His fraternal affiliation is with the Order of Free and Accepted 
Masons, being a member of the Chapter, Council, Commandery, Con- 
sistory, thirty-second degree, and Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order 
Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; he is a member of Carrick Civic Club and South Side Board of 
Trade. He took up his residence in Carrick in 1909, and has built a 
beautiful house at the corner of Brownsville Road and Clifton Boulevard. 

Mr. McCombs married, November 23, 1905, Ida Dorothy, born in 
Pittsburgh, a daughter of Jacob A. and Louise (Grundel) Rose, and they 



WESTERN I'EXXSYLVAXfA 573 

have had children: Dorothy Louise; William i're^ton, Jr., died at the 
age of two years ; Martha Mary. 



This has been an American family in the branch of 
FLANAGAN which Michael K. Flanagan was a member since 1850, 

when John F"lanagan, a native of Ireland, immigrated 
to the United States, making his home at Bradys Bend, Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, lie was a son of Timothy and Mary (I^ahive; Flanagan, 
his father a farmer of Ireland. 

(II) John Flanagan, son of Timothy and Mary (Lahivej Flanagan, 
was born in Ireland in 18 10, and when he was forty years of age came 
with his wife and family to Pennsylvania, as previously stated. He was 
for nearly all of his life an iron-worker in the employ of the Great West- 
ern Iron Works. His religion was the Roman Catholic, and in all church 
activities he was prominent, holding the superintendency of the Sunday 
school at Bradys Bend, being also connected with the other organizations 
of the church. He was a Democrat in political conviction. He married, 
August II, 1840, Bridget Kelly, born in county Clare, Ireland, in 1822, 
and had children: i. Michael K., of whom further. 2. Martin, born in 
1843; married Mary Droyer ; resides at Bradys Bend, Pennsylvania. 3. 
Patrick, for about thirty years weighmaster in the employ of a coal com- 
pany at Dubois, Pennsylvania; married Ann Walsh; died in March, 1905. 

4. John, engaged in the oil business in Oklahoma; married Nancy Boyle. 

5. Mary, married James McLoughlin ; lives at Bradys Bend, Pennsylvania. 

6. Thomas, a fanner of Bradys Bend, Pennsylvania ; married Catherine 
Reid. 7. Stephen, a machinist ; married Mary Manahan ; lives in Corry, 
Pennsylvania. 8. James, a railroad employee ; married Margaret Sommers ; 
lives in Newcastle, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Michael K. Flanagan, son of John and Bridget (Kelly) Fla- 
nagan, was born in county Clare, Ireland, September 15. 1841, died in 
May, 1905. He accompanied his parents to the United States when he 
was nine years of age and obtained the major part of his education in 
the schools of Bradys Bend, Pennsylvania, although his studies had begun 
in the homeland. In young manhood he was a teacher at Bradys Bend, 
and for three years during the Civil War was a member of the crew of 
a gun-boat in the Union service, stationed at Pittsburgh. After his dis- 
charge from the service he settled on a farm owned by his mother and 
himself at Bradys Bend, a tract of land forty acres in extent, which he 
cultivated for twenty-eight years, and was afterward engaged in the serv- 
ice of the borough of Wilkinsburg until his death. He was a man of 
upright honesty and in his dealings w'ith his fellows was ever guided by 
motives of strict integrity. A genial disposition and a nature delighting 
in comradeship gained him many friends, and those of his acquaintances 
and friends who survive him bear willing testimony to his value as a 
man, his consideration as a neighbor, his loyalty and his worth. He was 



574 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a communicant of the Roman Catholic Church, to which his family belongs. 
Mr. Flanagan married, July 17, 1865, Anna Powell, born in county 
Clare. Ireland, in 1841, daughter of Patrick and Mary (Moroney) Powell. 
Patrick Powell was a soldier in Company F, Sixth Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, commanded by Captain Taylor. On one occasion the com- 
pany was engaged in battle, Mr. Powell fighting by the side of his 
captain, when a sword thrust that would have ended Captain Taylor's life 
was averted by the quick action of Mr. Powell, a service that won him 
the life-long afifection of his superior officer. Children of Michael K. 
and Anna (Powell) Flanagan: i. John, died aged five years. 2. Mary, 
died aged three years. 3. James, died aged two years. 4. Winifred, lives 
with her widowed mother at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 5. Bridget, died 
aged one year. 6. Ellen, died aged three years. 7. Edward, died in 
infancy. 8. Anna. 9. Catherine. 10. Jane, married, June 24, 1914, Joseph 
McConnell, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



Since its founding in the United States, its residence 
LONGMORE mainly in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, members of 

this Irish family have been associated in business, not, 
like many of their countrymen who have settled in this region, preferring 
agricultural pursuits. 

(I) James Longmore, the emigrant, was born in 1815, in county 
Antrim. Ireland, died September 20. 1871. He was educated in the land 
of his birth, and after coming to the United States became a wholesale 
leather merchant of Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side), his place 
of business being on South Diamond street. After a business career 
profitably spent, he retired in 1869, living free from all business respon- 
sibilities until his death, two years later. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and with his wife a member of the United Presbyterian Church. He 
married, in 1842, Jessie Blackstock, born on Prince Edward Island, 
January 6, 1821, daughter of Joseph and Janet (Watt) Blackstock, who 
came to the United States with her parents about 1840. seven years after 
the immigration of her future husband, her parents passing their lives in 
Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side). Children of James and Jessie 
(Blackstock) Longmore: i. Margaret, born in 1843, "^i^d in infancy. 2. 
Robert Harrison, born 1845; married Emma Lynch; a daughter, Beulah. 
3. Mary E., born April 4, 1848. 4. .Sadie, born March i, 1851 ; married 
Thomas Craig Carson; children: Jessie May; Mary Longmore, who mar- 
ried William Henry Hastings, and has one child. William Henry Jr.; 
Mildred Reed; Margaret Jane; Alida Benhani. 5. John Buchanan, born 
February 14, 1855; married Mary Elizabeth Warwick; resides in Buf- 
falo, New York ; children : Edna Warwick and Lillie T. 6. Alice Jane, 
died in infancy. 7. William James, of whom further. 8. Joseph Black- 
stock, born October 25, 1864; married \'iol .\shwnrth ; resides in Pitts- 
burgh ; son, Harry Ewing. 





tTT^t^ 



\vi^s'I"J-:rx i'1-;xxsylva\ia 575 

(II) William James Longmoic, son oi Jamc~- and Jessie (Blackstock) 
Longmore, was born in Allegheny City, /Mlegheny county, J-'ennsylvania, 
November i8, i860, and there lived until he was eleven years of age. His 
education was obtained in the jjublic schools oi Allegheny City and liel- 
levue, in which latter place he has resided since 1872. Kor the i>a-t thirty- 
three years Mr. Longmore has been connected with the Westinghouse 
Electric and Manufacturing Comjjany, his jiresent jjosition in the emjjloy 
of that concern being as general purchasing agent, lie has served thi^ 
great company in that capacity since 1892, and during the twenty-two 
years that have elapsed since his apjwintment to his important station has 
filled his position with consjjicuous ability. Mr. Longmore is devoted to 
the interests of his company, a fidelity that reaches above the satisfactory 
discharge of his daily duties and works for and delights in the supremacy 
of the Westinghouse Company in its wide field. In 1889 Mr. Longmore 
built a handsome residence at No. 79 North Sprague avenue, Bellevue. 
He is a loyal Republican, and as such has been elected to the highest 
offices within the gift of his fellow citizens, serving on the borough 
council for six years, and from 1901 to 1903 filling the position of burgess. 
To this latter oflfice he was again elected without opposition at the election 
in 1914. and assumed the duties of the ofifice, with which he is familiar 
through his former service, on January i. 1914. With his wife, he was 
a member of the Avalon United Presbyterian Church. Progressiveness 
and public spirit are the attributes that have characterized Mr. Longmore's 
relation to the Bellevue community, and in the ofifices to which he has 
been called he has exercised the executive force and power that have 
made him valuable to the Westinghouse Company, with the same happy 
results. 

He married, in 1888. Emma C. Scheidemantel, born in Pittsburgh. 
Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, died May 21. 1914, daughter of George 
and Magdalena Scheidemantel. early settlers of Pittsburgh. Children of 
William James and Emma C. Longmore: i. William James Jr.. born 
August 4, 1890, died October 21. 1913. 2. Charles W.. born May 5. 1896, 
a student in Mercersburg Academy, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. 



John P. Mc\\'iniam5 is a member of a family of 
McWILLIAMS Irish descent, which has, however, lived in the west- 
ern part of the State of Pennsylvania since the old 
pioneer days and became identified with the life and traditions of the 
region. His father was Alexander Mc\\'illiams. a native of Ireland, who 
came as a boy from that country to the United States, and went directly 
to Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, where he settled and made his home. The 
city of Pittsburgh was at that time little more than a marsh and Mr. 
McWilliams, Sr.. made his home in a log cabin situated on what is now 
Fifth avenue. He learned the trade of stone mason and was one of 
those who worked upon the construction of the first bridge piers ever 



576 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

erected in the city. He was still a resident of Pittsburgh at the time of 
of the great fire, but about seventy years ago he bought a farm in Center 
township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, and moved there with his wife. 
Butler county was pretty much all a wilderness at the time of Mr. Mc- 
Williams' settlement, and he was obliged to clear his property of the 
virgin growth of forest and build for himself the log cabin in which our 
subject was later born. He and his wife continued to reside there for 
the remainder of his life, and there he finally died, at the age of eighty-three 
years ; his wife is still living, at the age of eighty-nine years. He married 
Eliza Beatty, a native of Belfast, Ireland, and a daughter of Hugh Beatty 
of that place. Her mother died in Ireland leaving Mr. Beatty a widower 
with three young daughters. He did not remain long in the "Old Country," 
but sailed for the United States, bringing his daughters with him, and 
settled in Butler, Pennsylvania. He later bought a farm in the neighbor- 
hood and there lived until his death. He had the reputation throughout 
the region of being an unusually honest man, a hard worker, and one who, 
in the homely phrase, "could mind his own business." To Mr. and Mrs. 
McWilliams were born eight children, six boys and two girls, as follows : 
John P., of whom further; Hugh B.. deceased; Anne Jane; William; Mary 
Elizabeth ; Samuel, a resident of Avalon, Pennsylvania ; Robert, deceased ; 
David. The old pioneer days, when Mr. McWilliams, Sr., was rearing 
his family, were rough indeed, and it is recorded of him that his wages 
during the first years in Pittsburgh were stipulated to be fifty cents a day. 

John P. McWilliams. the eldest child of Alexander and Eliza (Beatty) 
McWilliams, was born November lo, 1849, in Center township, Butler 
county, Pennsylvania. At that time the only school in the neighborhood 
was one of primitive log construction, and in this the child received his 
education. After the completion of his general studies he turned to the 
learning of a trade, and for this purpose he went to Pittsburgh and ap- 
prenticed himself to William Trimble, of Trimble & Mclntyre, a firm of 
builders. He here served out his full term of apprenticeship and continued 
in their employ for a period of about ten years. After severing his con- 
nection with this concern, Mr. McWilliams became engaged in the building 
and contracting business, the firm name being McWilliams & Beatty. 
Afterward a two years' employment by the Gill Car Works was followed 
by a position as foreman with the Pittsburgh Street Car Company, which 
he held for four years. After this he turned once more to his ambition 
of an independent business, and engaged in contracting. His residence 
in Bellevue, Pennsylvania, where his business is situated, has continued 
for twenty-one years. 

Mr. McWilliams married. May 28, 1872, Imelda Meals, also a native 
of Butler county, Pennsylvania, she having been born upon the farm near 
to that of the father of Mr. McWilliams. Mrs. McWilliams was a daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth (Jack) Meals, and a granddaughter of Jacob 
and Catherine (Varnum) Meals, early residents of Butler county, Pennsyl- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 577 

vania. On the paternal side Mrs. Mc Williams is of (jerman descent, and 
in the maternal line from the Jack family of Scotch origin. Her grand- 
parents on this side were Samuel and Jane (Newell) Jack, pioneers in 
Butler county. Mr. Jack had six hundred acres in that region upon which 
he settled, securing it directly from the state government. Much of this 
he cleared and upon it built his own house, wherein he lived to within 
two years of his death, when he moved to Butler, where he died. A part 
of this property has never been .sold, but has remained in the hands of 
the family since the days of the original government grant. Mrs. Mc- 
Williams and sister, Mrs. C. M. Furrow, are now the owners of th's 
portion. Mr. Ebenezer Jack, a son of Samuel Jack, and an uncle of the 
present Mrs. McWilliams, served during the Civil War as a lieutenant in 
the Union army. To Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams have been born six chil- 
dren, as follows : Ella Elizabeth, who has held for some years the position 
of head bookkeeper of the Consolidated Lamp & Glass Company; Olive 
May, a nurse; Lawrence Alex, died at age of two years; Wade Linton, 
married Ida L. Abbott and had by her two children, Marguerite Hill and 
Jack Linton; Earl Lavern, married Martha M. Ford and had by her one 
daughter, Martha Marie; Dean Leroy, who lives at home with his parents. 
Mr. McWilliams and his family are members of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 



John White, of Avalon, Pennsylvania, is a man of excep- 
WHITE tional mechanical ingenuity and skill, which he uses to good 

advantage, his efforts in this direction having been the means 
on several occasions of saving many human lives, the best recompense a 
man could wish for. He is also a man of integrity and worth, actively 
interested in various movements of benefit to mankind, and therefore a 
valuable member of the community in which he resides. 

David White, formerly Whyte, father of John White, was a native of 
Scotland, residing near Dundee, from whence he emigrated to the United 
States, in 1840, accompanied by his wife, Euphemia (Will) White, and 
children, making the voyage in the ship "Cragie Var," being four months 
on the water, a fact which seems incredible in these days of swift travel. 
It was the captain's first trip across the Atlantic Ocean and he lost his 
course; at the end of the three months, when their food was almost ex- 
hausted, they came in sight of St. Johns, Newfoundland, \vhere they re- 
plenished their food supply, and at the end of another month, when they 
reached the port of New York, their food was again near exhaustion. Mr. 
White and his family came direct to the vicinity of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where the brother (Thomas Will) of Mrs. White had previously 
settled, he being a member of the faculty of the Universitv of Pittsburgh. 
Mr. White followed the occupation of carpenter, working on steamboat 
cabins, in which he achieved a large degree of success, being enabled to 
provide a comfortable home for his family. His death occurred in Pitts- 



578 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

burgh at the age of ninety-one years. Mr. and Mrs. White were the 
parents of three children: Margaret McLagan ; Jessie, who became the 
wife of Joseph McNaugher, a prominent contractor; John, of whom 
further. 

John White was born near Dundee, Scotland, May 17, 1834, and at 
the age of six years was brought to this country by his parents, as before 
narrated. He was educated in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, coming into the city from the country school, where he acquired 
a good mathematical training. He was employed for a short time in a 
jack factory. Leaving that he entered the employ of a gold beater, where 
they manufactured gold leaf, gold and tin foil, also gold plate and springs, 
which were then used by dentists. During the nine months with him he 
learned the art of refining gold and giving it the proper aUoy for the 
purpose for which it was to be used. Not liking the business, he left to 
learn pattern making and drawing at Fort Pitt works, where he served 
four years under the instruction of Mr. N. K. Wade, at that time a noted 
mechanical engineer. Leaving there he was employed for a short time in 
Wightman's machine shop, where he finished some woolen machinery, and 
also three sets of patterns for improved oscillating engines. Leaving there 
he entered the employ of the P., F. W. & C. Railroad shop in Allegheny, 
where he began a career which continued for over thirty-two years. At 
that time everything in railroading was quite crude. Noticing that car 
wheels were being pressed on the axels with a large screw and required 
the services of five men, he suggested to the master mechanic to change 
to a hydraulic press, and after some argument was authorized to build 
one, which was done, and thus cut down the labor to three men and the 
time from twenty-seven minutes to seven. This established his reputation 
as a mechanical expert. From that time on he was authorized to con- 
tinue improvements in all the mechanical branches, which would be too 
numerous to mention. But a few of them were the designing and con- 
struction of the first engine and truck for steam cars, which were used 
for some time on the accommodation trains. Also changed the style of 
the locomotive cylinders which were then made right and left, so that 
they would fit on either side of an engine by having the exhaust and steam 
parts cast central on the cylinders. This was at once adopted by the Pitts- 
burgh Locomotive Works and other railroads. The Janney coupler, which 
has become universal, was given to him to develop. He got two models 
one-eighth size, and from them designed and modeled the complete coupler, 
establishing the centers, the contour of the connection which has remained 
the same. The general manager then requested him to design two Belgian 
Buffers to be used with the Janney coupler. He did so, and invented an 
equalizing bar connecting the buffers, which would keep them both in con- 
nection at the same time. In order to do so, he raised the platform floor 
up to the door sill, making it safe to walk from one car to another while 
in motion. A severe test was made of this improvement. A short time 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 579 

after it was applied to a new train of live cars on the E. & 1'. division. 
The train consisted of three coaclies, smol<er and baggage car. By some 
misunderstanding of orders this train met with a heavy freight train on a 
curve. Botli engines were wrecked. 'Jhe front end of the baggage car 
was forced on the tender, but none of the remainder of the train was 
injured, and not a passenger luirl. Had it not been for this improvement, 
the train might have been wrecked and many lives lost. This improve- 
ment was patented and signed over to the railway company without any 
compensation, thus making railway travel safe and comfortable. lie also 
organized the .Allegheny branch of the Kailway Young Men's Chri-tian 
Association, was its first president, which organization continues to do 
good. After leaving the railway, he continued to manufacture patterns 
and models for other inventors, which did not prove a financial success, 
and he is now retired from active mechanical work. 

Mr. White has always taken an active interest in the First United 
Presbyterian Church of Allegheny. On June 20, 1863, he was elected 
elder of the church and is still serving in that office, and on the fiftieth 
anniversary of his election as elder was presented by his friends in the 
church with an eloquent testimonial to his faithfulness and efficiency. For 
many years he had charge of the music of the church. Mr. White w-as 
also one of the committee of five which revised the first Psalter and Bible 
songs used by the United Presbyterians. He also engaged in mission work 
in the Third Ward many years, the outgrowth of which was the Fifth and 
Tenth United Presbyterian churches of Allegheny. 

Mr. White married, September 20, 1887, Annie Warden Donaldson, 
born in Pittsburgh, North Side, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Car- 
son) Donaldson. Children: i. Audley Donaldson, born July 28. 1888; 
attended and graduated from the Avalon High School, studied mechanical 
engineering at Carnegie Institute night school, graduating as an honor 
student in a class of eighteen: six years of this time he was employed bv 
the R. W. Hunt Company, engineers; he died after a brief illness, June ir, 
1913. 2. John Stanley, born July 5. 1890; now connected with the firm 
of Hubbard & Company. 3. Margaret Elizabeth, born November 28, 1892. 
died November 8. 1913. 4. Kenneth \\'arden, born March 26, 189; ; a 
student at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. 

(The Donaldson Line.) 

Robert Donaldson, grandfather of Mrs. John White, was born in 
Utica, New York, in 1775. a descendant of a Scotch-Irish ancestry. He 
was a civil engineer by profession, and laid out the central part of the city 
of Pittsburgh. He and the members of his family were connected with 
the Associate Reformed Church, now the United Presbyterian Church. 
He was the owner of considerable property on Wood and Water streets, 
Pittsburgh. His sister. Isabel, married Judge James Mitchell, of Phila- 
delphia. Mr. Donaldson married Isabel Clendennin. and among their 
children was Robert, of whom further. Isabel Clendennin was a daughter 



58o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of James Clendennin, who was a soldier in the Continental Army, thereby 
making Mrs. John White, his great-granddaughter, eligible as a Daughter of 
the Revolution. 

Robert Donaldson, father of Mrs. John White, was born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and educated. His first em- 
ployment was with Diennis Leonard, engaged in the lumber business, and 
he remained with him for forty-one years, this fact attesting to his faith- 
fulness to duty. He married (first) Lethea Chambers, daughter of John 
Chambers, who was the owner of considerable real estate in Pittsburgh, 
and whose relatives were prominent in the glass business there. They were 
the parents of three children: John, a veteran; Presley; Isabella. He 
married (second), in February, 1849, Elizabeth Carson, daughter of Wil- 
liam Carson, who came to this country from Ireland in 1830 on the ship 
"Dumfries," being six weeks and four days en route, and landed in Balti- 
more, Maryland, from whence he removed to Romney, Virginia, coming 
from there to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1835, making the trip in a 
four-horse wagon. He was one of the first teachers in the First Ward 
of Pittsburgh, North Side, and later was a leather merchant, in which 
business he was very successful. He was a land owner in Ireland and 
also had a haberdashery in Belfast. He married Ann Warden, a native 
of Ireland, although her people were of Scotland, daughter of Robert 
Warden, who was born in 1794, married Mary Orr, and spent his entire 
life in Scotland and Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Donaldson had five 
children : William, Annie Warden, Lizzie, Sarah, Emma. John C. Don- 
aldson, a half-brother of Mrs. John White, enlisted during the Civil War 
as a private in Company J, One Hundred and Second Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry, when a mere boy, served as secretary to Colonel Rowley 
and was honorably discharged August 7, 1862. The members of the 
family are active in the work of the United Presbyterian Church. 



The name of Wagner is one which is known the world 
WAGNER over, in many fields. In America it has been chiefly iden- 
tified with commercial and financial afifairs, in which various 
members of the family have achieved a large measure of prominence. 

Peter C. Wagner, of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, was born in Prussia, 
Germany, February 2, 1829, died in Pennsylvania, January i, 1892. In 
1849 he came to the United States, settling in Allegheny, where he com- 
menced working at the trade he had mastered in his native country, shoe- 
making. He opened a shop and store for the sale of his handmade product, 
and two years later, because of lack of space for his increased business, 
was obliged to move, and located in the brick building at the corner of 
Main and Thirteenth streets, where he did a prosperous business, employed 
a large number of workmen, and continued there until 1871, at which 
time the machine-made goods of New England, and the east in general, 
had almost driven handmade work in this line from the markets of the 




e./L.%^^j 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 581 

country. He therefore opened a regular shoe store, and in 1883 was 
obliged to seek larger quarters for this, when he moved to a point on 
Main street, below Ninth street, and remained there until he retired from 
business in 1890. He was a director of the F"armers' and Mechanics' liank 
from its inception, and was the treasurer and a director in the Sharpsburg 
and Etna Fire Insurance Company from 1873 to 1881. With his own 
hands and spade he helped to dig the trenches for fortifications at Morning 
Side road when General Robert E. I^e was expected to enter the city of 
Pittsburgh, during the Civil War. Politically Mr. Wagner was a Demo- 
crat, and he was a trustee of St. Mary's Catholic Church. 

Mr. Wagner married, at St. Mary's Church, Allegheny, in 1852, Eliz- 
abeth Bourget, of French descent, born in Germany, January 10, 1831, 
came to this country at the age of two years, and died April i, 1886. They 
had children: Mary S., born in 1853, is unmarried; John H., born March 
I, 1856, married Mary Schramm, and in association with his brother, 
Sylvester N.. conducts a retail shoe store in Sharpsburg, and a wholesale 
one in Pittsburgh ; Elizabeth, born March 14, 1858, entered the Convent 
of the Sacred Heart, at Buffalo, New York, and is known to the world 
as Sister M. Brigitta ; Peter C, of further mention ; Amelia, born October 
5, 1862, is unmarried; Sylvester N., born February 25, 1865, married 
Catherine Glauber; Leo J., born June 9, 1867, is a dry goods merchant in 
Sharpsburg, and married Henrietta Jehle ; Martha R., born in 1872, is also 
unmarried, and the three sisters live together. 

Peter C. (2) Wagner, son of Peter C. (i) and Elizabeth (Bourget) 
Wagner, was born at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, August 17, i860, died 
August 19, 1913. He acquired his education in the public and parochial 
schools of Sharpsburg, and this was supplemented by a course at Duff's 
Business College, from which he was graduated in 1878. Until 1879 he 
assisted his father in his business, then entered the employ of G. W. 
Tilghman, who was engaged in the clothing business. Two years later 
he became assistant bookkeeper and shipping clerk with Spang, Chalfant 
& Company, and after some time again entered the employ of Mr. Tilgh- 
man, and at the expiration of two years was appointed assistant post- 
master of Sharpsburg, under Mr. Casey. In 1887 he and Mr. Tilghman 
formed a business partnership, and opened a clothing store in Homestead, 
which was conducted under the firm name of Tilghman & Wagner. Mr. 
Wagner purchased the interest of his partner in 1888 and conducted the 
business alone until 1895, when he admitted his brother, Leo J., as a 
partner, but bought him out in 1899. and conducted the business alone 
again until his death. He was connected in various capacities with a num- 
ber of other business enterprises, a partial list of these being as follows : 
A director of the Homestead National Bank; director in the Homestead 
Heating Company; director in the Swasteka Developing Company (Coffee") 
in Texas ; president of the Homestead Business INIen's Association for a 
period of twenty-one years ; a member of the ^Merchants' Association. 



582 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

His connection with other organizations was : A member of Duquesne 
Council, of Pittsburgh, No. 264; Branch 70, Cathohc Mutual Benefit As- 
sociation ; Knights of Columbus, and held the office of secretary of the 
Branch for sixteen years; Knights of St. George, No. 18, of Homestead; 
Brotherhood of Elks, No. 650, of Homestead. He was independent in 
his political opinions, and had the courage of his convictions. He was a 
member of St. Mary Magdalene's Catholic Church, a member of its 
board of trustees at the time the new church was built, and a member of 
the Holy Name Society connected with it, having also served as president 
of this society. In 1895 he built a fine residence at No. 337 Tenth avenue. 
When the Homestead Park movement was first spoken of, he was one of 
the men who went to Mr. Frick and solicited his aid in favor of this 
project, and it was largely through his instrumentality that success attended 
these efiforts. 

Mr. Wagner married, November 8, 1888, Alice O'Leary, born in Pitts- 
burgh, on the present site of Mercy Hospital, September 26, 1870. She 
is a daughter of William O'Leary, born in Pittsburgh, November 15, 182S, 
who was a glass manufacturer in that city until his death, being a pioneer 
in that field of manufacture. He owned the property on which Mercy 
Hospital now stands, and lived there many years. He married Mary Derby, 
born in 1847, died in East End in 1872, a daught'er of James Derby, and 
his wife, both natives of England, who were early residents of Pittsburgh, 
where she died at the age of thirty years, and he also died young. Mrs. 
Wagner is the granddaughter of John and Mary (Murphy) O'Leary, 
both born in Pittsburgh, and married there, and he was also a glass man- 
ufacturer. Mr. and Mrs. Wagner had children : Alice, who married 
Charles Dublin and lives in Munhall, has children: Alice Marie and Ger- 
aldine : Mercedes, married John Henry Bullen, has a son, John Henry Jr.. 
and lives with her mother ; Mary was graduated from the Sacred Heart 
Academy, in Bufifalo, New York, as were her two elder sisters also ; Peter 
Charles, a student in Homestead High School: Josjichine, a student in 
Sacred Heart Academy. Bufifalo; Margaret, died in 1912. Mrs. Wagner 
and her daughters have a talent for painting which would do honor to 
many a professional artist, and their magnificent home is filled with beauti- 
ful oil paintings and paintings on china, the work of their brushes. 



The family name of Knox has a territorial origin, being de- 
KNOX rived from the Celtic word "Cnoc," signifying a small hill. 
About the year 1266 Johanne de Cnok is named as a witness 
in a charter of the lands at Ingleston, Renfrewshire, Scotland. In 1328 
two payments from the exchequer of King Robert the Bruce were made 
to Alamus del Knoc. Those bearing the name of Knox in this day are 
proud of the fact that they are connected with the family that produced 
John Knox, the illustrious Scotch reformer, to whom Englishmen are 
indebted for the Protestant character of their Book of Common Prayer, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 5^3 

and Scotclimcii for a rcfonnalioii so thorough a-, io ijcrmanenlly resist 
the encroachments of an aggressive sacerdotalism, iiy three centuries he 
anticipated tlie parochial system of education, now tiie law of England, 
and by nearly half that period he set for those jjrinciples of civil and 
religious liberty which culminated in a system constitutional government. 
The members of the family in Scotland, Jreland and England arc promin- 
ent all down the years of recorded happenings in those lands in civil, 
ecclesiatical and military life. They have held the highest positions in 
church and state, and in transplanting to America the family lost no 
portion of their strength, power or prominence. 

Major-General Henry Knox, of the Revolution, descended from the 
Belfast, Ireland, family. Alexander Knox, a powerful anrl elegant writer, 
was of the Londonderry, Ireland, family, and was a personal friend of 
the founder of Methodism, John Wesley. Hugh Knox, of the Scotch 
family of Ranfuilie, settled in the Parish of Donogheady, Londonderry, 
Ireland, and had sons and grandsons, prominent as divines. Philander 
Chase Knox, secretary of state in the cabinet of President Taft, descendr- 
from the family of James Knox, of Strathburn, Ireland. The first record 
of the branch of the Knox family under discussion here is in 1689 when, 
tradition says, they settled in county Tyrone, Ireland, at Stony Falls. 
Straburn, whence they had come from Scotland. 

(I) James Knox, two brothers and one sister, were at Stony Falls, 
county Tyrone, Ireland, in 1689. James Knox married, and had children : 
William, Arthur, Mary, Nancy. 

(II) William Knox, eldest son of James Knox, was born in Ireland 
in 1720, married, and had children. 

(III) Rev. William (2) Knox, son of William (i) Knox, was born 
at Stony Falls, Straburn, county Tyrone, Ireland, January 2^, 1767, and 
died in Cadiz, Ohio, June 16, 1851, while on the "circuit." From his 
early youth he was a devoted student of theology, and at the early age of 
seventeen years was a regularly licensed preacher. He began ministerial 
work as a local preacher in his native country, but desiring a wider field. 
came to the United States in 1797, accompanied by his wife. Margaret 
(MacCollum) Knox, and her family. The English and French were at 
war at that time, and tradition has it that a warship of one of these na- 
tions compelled their vessel to lie-to while the passengers were searched, 
and everything of value taken from them, the cargo also confiscated. 
The only articles of value saved were some jewelry and moneys which 
William Knox had wrapped about him. He joined the Baltimore Con- 
ference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1800, but subsequently be- 
came a member of the Pittsburgh Conference. He has the record of hav- 
ing preached in every city and town of W^estern Pennsylvania, and also in 
many in Ohio. While preaching in Connellsville. he married his second 
wife, Nancy Smith, a native of that town; he married (third") Esther 
Tingley. Children by first wife : James, born in Ireland ; William. John. 



584 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Children by second wife: David Smith, of further mention; Nancy, who 

married White; Jane. Children by third wife: Jeremiah, Matthew, 

Arthur, Mary, Sarah, Esther. 

(IV) David Smith Knox, son of Rev. William (2) and Nancy 
(Smith) Knox, was born in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1805, 
died in 1867. His early education was acquired in the public schools of 
Cadiz, Ohio, and at the age of fifteen years he was apprenticed to learn 
the trade of printing. At one time, in connection with Judge Weeks, 
he was editor of the Uniontozvn Democrat, although he held Republican 
principles. After severing connection with this paper, he taught school 
for several years, then, in association with Dr. Lafferty, engaged in the 
drug business, conducting a store opposite the old iron bridge, the first 
built in this country. In 1836 he removed to Brownsville and became the 
teller of the Monongahela Bank, was advanced to the position of cashier 
in 1840, and held this until his death. He was a member of the board 
of directors which built the first public school in Brownsville. The bank 
with which Mr. Knox was connected, and two others, the Franklin Bank 
of Little Washington and the old Bank of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, were 
the only ones in the State of Pennsylvania which were not overwhelmed 
by the panic of 1873. He was a Whig, then a RepubUcan, in politics, and 
he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He 
married (first) Sarah, born in Connellsville, May 29. 1829, a daughter 
of Dr. James Franciss, Avhose wife belonged to the Quaker sect. Dr. 
Franciss was a surgeon under Washington in the Revolutionary war, and 
gained great praise for his tireless energy and kindness in caring for the 
sick and wounded during the terrible winter at Valley Forge. He mar- 
ried (second) Rebecca, daughter of Jonathan and Rebecca Page, of Con- 
nellsville. Children of first marriage: i. Sarah, born in 1830; married, 
in 1850, James Smith Miller, who died at the age of thirty-one years. 2. 
William Franciss. of further mention. Children of second marriage : 3. 
Thomas Page, born in 1837, now deceased. 4. Samuel B., born in 1839; 
was in active service as a surgeon during the Civil War. 5. Richard, 
born in 1841. now deceased. 6. Mary Eliza, born in 1843; married George 
Graff, and lives in Omaha, Nebraska. 7. Caroline, born in 1845. 8. Alfred, 
born in 1847; vice-president of the Mellon National Bank of Pittsburgh. 
9. Narcissa. born in 1849. 10. Rebecca, born in 1851. 11. Philander 
Chase, born May 6, 1853 ; was appointed attorney-general of the United 
States by President McKinley, served as United States senator from 
the State of Pennsylvania, and was secretary of state during President 
Taft's administration. 12. Harriette, born in 1855; is living on the old 
homestead. 

(V) Dr. William Franciss Knox, son of David Smith and Sarah 
(Franciss) Knox, was born in Connellsville. Pennsylvania, March 30. 
1831. The public schools of Brownsville furnished his preparatory educa- 
tion, and he then became a student at Allegheny College, which conferred 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 5^5 

upon liim the honorary degree of A.M., and frt^ni which he went to 
the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, and was grad- 
ulated from this institution, y\pril i, 1X54, the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine being conferred upon liim. In December of the same year he lo- 
cated at McKeesport, Alleglieny county, Pennsylvania, and has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his j)rofession there for the past sixty years, 
although he has partially retired now. He was one of the organizers of 
the Allegheny County Medical Society. He is also a member of the State 
Medical and the American Medical associations, and of the Masonic Vra- 
ternity. He is a Republican politically, and he and his wife are member^ 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married (first) Elizabeth Kiddrx), 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and they had children: Jennie; Wil- 
liam, of Spartanburg, South Carolina; Sarah, married Rev. William D. 
Irwin, a Presbyterian minister, of Meadville. Dr. Knox married (sec- 
ond) Mary Paull, daughter of Colonel W. L. Miller, of Port Perry, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Miller was a well known business man, the owner of saw 
and grist mills, at Port Perry, and active in the interests of the Democractic 
party. 



Of true Scotch-Irish blood, William H. Koughan, of Mc- 
KOUGHAN Keesport, of the first generation of his branch born in 

the United States, traces to William Koughan and his 
wife, Sarah (Akin) Koughan, the first named born in Ireland, the latter 
a descendant of Scotch Highlanders. Two generations of their descend- 
ants were born on Prince Edward Island, a province of the Dominion of 
Canada, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, an island inhabited by descendants 
of Scotch, Irish, English and Acadian settlers, about one-half the pop- 
ulation being of Scotch descent. With the third generation began their 
residence in the United States. William H. Koughan, of the fourth gen- 
eration, now a resident in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, is of the first gen- 
eration bom in Pennsylvania, he now residing in the city of his birth. 

( I ) William Koughan, born in Ireland, there married Sarah Akin, of 
Scotch parentage. William and Sarah Koughan soon after their marriage 
crossed the ocean to America, settling on Prince Edward Island, in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, where their second son, Martin, grandfather of William 
H. Koughan, was born, in 1804. William and Sarah Koughan had two 
sons. William and Martin, and two daughters, one married a Mr. Prolt and 
the other a Mr. Redden. 

(II) Martin Koughan, son of William and Sarah (Akin) Koughan. 
was born on Prince Echvard Island, Dominion of Canada, in 1804. died 
there in 1894. after a long and useful life. He was a ship carpenter by 
trade. Init was also a house and bridge builder and general contractor. 
He married Catherine Cahill. born in Limerick, Ireland, in 1802. who 
came to Prince Edward Island when a young w^oman and there died about 
1882. Children': W'illiam. deceased; Mary, deceased: John, deceased; 



586 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Martin {2); Barbara; Emma, deceased; Joseph J., of further mention; 
Theresa, deceased; Dennis, deceased; and tliree who died in infancy. 

(Ill J Joseph J. Koughan, son of Martin and Catherine (Cahill) 
Koughan, was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, February 22, 1850. 
He was educated m pubUc schools and lived at home until sixteen years 
of age, then the same spirit of adventure that brought his grandparents 
across the seas impelled him to leave home and seek his fortune in a 
strange land. He landed in Boston, Massachusetts, and there learned the 
blacksmith's trade and remained seven years. In 1873 he located in Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania, and there secured employment at his trade in the 
steel tube works and with the exception of eight years spent at Middle- 
town, Dauphin county, Pennsylsvania, in the tube works there, has re- 
sided continuously in McKeesport, employed in the steel mills. • He has 
prospered and has not confined his activity to his own trade. In 1896 he 
established a bakery in ]\IcKeesport under the firm name J. J. Koughan & 
Son, that was conducted by his sons, William H., Charles and John, and 
was a very successful venture until the plant was sold to the Zieglers. He 
owns property in the city and may well consider his years, sixty-four, well 
spent. He is an active and earnest Republican, but has never sought or 
accepted public office. In religious faith he is a Catholic. 

Mr. Koughan married, in 1874, ]\Iary E. Atkinson, of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, daughter of William and Alice (Quinn) Atkinson. William At- 
kinson was born in New York City and gave up his life in defense of the 
Union, falling in a battle of the Civil War. Alice (Quinn) Atkinson, born 
in Ireland, died in New York City about 1854. Children: William and 
Mary E. William Atkinson was a son of William Atkinson, who was a son 
of William Atkinson, who was born in England, died in New York City. 
Children of Joseph J. and Mary E. Koughan : Catherine, deceased ; Wil- 
liam H., of further mention; John P.; Theresa, deceased; Charles J., of 
further mention ; Mary Elizabeth ; Hilda Ellen ; Theresa Regina. 

(IV) William H. Koughan, eldest son of Joseph J. and Mary E. (At- 
kinson) Koughan, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1877. 
He attended the public schools of Middletown, Pennsylvania, during the 
eight years of the family residence there, finishing his studies in the paro- 
chial schools of McKeesport. He then learned the baker's trade, and in 
1896, with his father, formed the firm J. J. Koughan & Son, establishing a 
bakery at iioo Walnut street, McKeesport. To the bakery he has added 
an ice cream manufacturing plant, the latter branch of the business now 
being conducted at the new building 80 by 120 feet erected in 1909. Mr. 
Koughan is not only practical and experienced in every detail of his busi- 
ness, but possesses an acute business instinct that rarely leads him astray. 
He transacts a large and profitable business in McKeesport and suburbs 
and has also an additional outlet for his products by supplying Oakford 
Park, at Jeannette, Pennsylvania, and they also operate what is known as 
the Koughan Amusement Company, at that park, of which he is president. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 587 

He is a Republican in ijoiitics, and a iniiiiher oi liic Calliolic Chun:h. Mr. 
Koughan is a member of McKeesport Lodge, Jienevolent and I'rotective 
Order of J^Jks. Mr. Kougban married, in 1902, Matilda Porter, daughter 
of William and Mary IVjrter, of McKeesport. Children: Margaret and 
William A. 

(IV) Charles J. Koughan, third son of Joseph J. and Mary E. fyVt- 
kinson) Koughan, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, January 24, 
1882. He was educated in iniblic and j)arochial schools in Middletown and 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and began business life as a newsboy. From 
1898 until 1901 he was employed in the tube works at McKeesport, then 
until 1904 was associated with the firm of J. J. Koughan & Son, bakers 
and ice cream manufacturers. From November 1, 1904, until January 12, 
1909, he was in partnership with Peter Koch, in the real estate business 
as Peter Koch & Company. On the latter's death he purchased Mr. Koch's 
interest and is now sole owner of the business. He has been very success- 
ful and has accumulated considerable property in the Seventh and Eighth 
wards of the city. He is a Republican in politics, is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and for the past six years has 
been treasurer of his lodge. In religious faith he is a Catholic. He mar- 
ried, June 6. 1904, Anna C. Koch, of McKeesport. Children: Frances, 
born February 17, 1905; Anna, December 30, 1909. 



The Hissrich family has been in this country but a 
FnSSRICH few generations, but they have made their mark as men 
of excellent executive ability in business as well 
as private life. 

Charles Hissrich was born in Germany, and emigrated to America in 
1861 with his wife and family. He settled at Wheeling. West \'irginia, 
where he followed his calling as a tailor until he retired from active busi- 
ness, and is now living near Canal Dover, Ohio, at the age of eighty-three 
years. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic Church. 
Mr. Hissrich married, in Germany. Lizette Bieker. born in 1836. died in 
1891. They had children: Richard, of further mention; Frank, who died 
in March. 1914. 

Richard Hissrich was born at Kur-Hessen, Germany, October 8. 1859. 
He was but two years of age when he was brought to this country by his 
parents, and in everything but the actual fact of birth was an American. 
He was educated in the public schools of Wheeling. West \'irginia, and 
was graduated from the Wheeling Business College. He was then ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of tailoring, and was for a number of years 
with T. C. Mofifitt, a brother of Professor Moffitt. president of Washington 
College. In 1886 Mr. Hissrich came to Braddock. Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was in the employ of Jacob Katz for seventeen years, 
and then formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, George Aul. which 
continued five years. In political matters he is a Democrat. Mr. Hissrich 



588 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

married, August 24, 1880, Emma Louise Aul, born in South Side, Pitts- 
burgh, June 4, 1862, daughter of Conrad and Catherine (Peter) Aul, the 
former born in Germany in 1827, died in 1894; the latter born in Canton, 
Ohio, in 1839, died in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1906. Mr. Aul came 
to America in his young manhood, and went to Canal Dover, Ohio, removed 
to Dover, in the same state, and subsequently to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
He Mras a dyer and cleaner by trade, and when he removed to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, he established a business under the firm name of C. Aul & 
Son, with which he was identified until the time of his death. This 
business is still carried on under the same firm name. He had children: 
Emma Louise, mentioned above as the wife of Mr. Hissrich; George Con- 
rad ; Anna, deceased ; Charles Adam ; Henry Jacob ; Minnie Catherine. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hissrich have had children: i. Charles Conrad, deceased. 2. 
Minnie Catherine, married A. L. Seddon ; one child living, Virginia C, and 
Ruth B., deceased. 3. Richard John, married Mary Naylor; two children: 
Bernadette M. and Verne C. 4. Arthur Charles. 5. Harry Frank. 6. 
Edgar George. 7. Mary, deceased. 8. Catherine Lizette. 9. Margaret 
Louise. Mrs. Hissrich owns a beautiful home at No. 428 Hawkins avenue, 
North Braddock, Pennsylvania. The family are members of St. Joseph's 
Roman Catholic Church. 



John McGreevy was born in Ireland, died in Port Perry, 
McGREEVY Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1884. He emigrated 

to America in 1852, and located at Braddock, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, then removed to Leechburg, and finally made his 
home in Port Perry. He was a devout member of the Catholic Church. He 
married, in Ireland, Mary McGinty, a native of that country, who died in 
Leechburg, Pennsylvania, in 1861. They had children: Nicholas, deceased; 
John, of further mention ; Patrick, wounded while in military service dur- 
ing the Civil W^ar; Hugh, wounded at the battle of Gettysburg; Bernard, 
also an active participant in the Civil War, died in Andersonville Prison ; 
Mary, now deceased, married John Graham, of Braddock ; Edward, died 
in Hazelwood, March 30, 1912. 

John (2) McGreevy, son of John (i) and Mary (McGinty) McGreevy, 
was born near Belfast, county Down. Ireland, May 6, 1838, died in Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania, March 2, 1912. His education was commenced in Ire- 
land and completed in the public schools of Leechburg and McKeesport. 
Coming to Braddock in 1852 he found employment on a farm, receiving 
five dollars at first, and later ten dollars. For a time he was then engaged 
in coal mining, after which he was in the contracting business, in which he 
continued until 1895. He then engaged in the mercantile business at No. 
669 Jones avenue, and was identified with this until 191 1. This business 
is now conducted by Mrs. James Costello and her husband. He was a strong 
Democrat, and a conscientious member of the Catholic Church, to which 
he was also a liberal contributor. He was married at .St. Thomas' Church, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 5«9 

in Braddock, in 1870, to Catherine, born in Maryland in 1852, daughter of 
John and Margaret (Morgan) McMuUen. He was of county Louth, Ire- 
land, and she was born in the same county. Her mother died in Ireland, 
and she came to America with her father, but he later returned to Ireland 
and died there. They married in Ireland, and had children : John and 
Mary Ann, deceased ; Charles ; Catherine, mentioned above as the wife of 
Mr. McGreevy; Ellen; Margaret; Bridget; William; Hugh, deceased; Rose; 
Alice. Mr. and Mrs. McGreevy had children: i. James, who married Mollie 
Walters, of Braddock, and had children: Gilbert, Walter Jacob, Catherine, 
Irene, Mercedes, Joseph, Ruth. 2. Charles Edward, of Braddock, married 
Elizabeth Farrell, and had children: Charles and Lois. 3. Mary Eliza- 
beth, married John Sheehan, of Braddock, and had children: Mildred, Dan- 
iel, Joseph, Dorothy. 4. Hugh, unmarried. 5. John, married Catherine 
Salmon, and has one child, John Kenneth. 6. Rosella, married James Cos- 
tello. And Bernard, Margaret, Agnes, Margaret, Joseph, all deceased. Mr. 
McGreevy was a very successful man of business, and at the time of his 
death had acquired a very considerable fortune. 

While the name of RothraufiF has not become Ameri- 
ROTHRAUFF canized in form, the family, which has now been resi- 
dent here for some generations, has become American 
in every respect. 

(I) Jacob Rothraufif was born east of the mountains, and at an early 
day settled at Hagerstown, Washington county, Maryland. He took an 
active part in the War of 1812. He died in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, 
at an advanced age. 

(TI) Samuel Rothraufif, son of Jacob Rothraufif, was born in Hagers- 
town, Maryland, in 1812, died in 1855. He removed to Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was a coal miner and farmer, and made his home 
in Braddock in 1849, '^ter living at what is now Dewey, Pennsylvania, and 
later came to Braddock, where he bought an acre of land extending from 
Tenth to Eleventh streets. He married Ann, born in 181 1, died in 1865. 
daughter of Patrick and Elizabeth McCloskey, the former of whom died 
in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, the latter died in Allegheny county in the 
same state. They had children : Henry, Elizabeth and Barbara, deceased ; 
Thomas, of further mention ; Samuel and Jane, deceased ; Mary, Adeline. 
John. Robert and William, deceased. 

(Ill) Thomas Rothraufif, son of Samuel and Ann (McCloskey) Roth- 
raufif, was born in Mercer county. Pennsylvania, April 23, 1838. He was 
seven years of age when he was brought to what is now Dewe)', and in 
1849 to Wilkinsburg township, where Braddock now stands, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools. He became a coal miner, and then worked in 
the Edgar Thompson Steel Plant for eighteen years. He was then a mer- 
chant at No. 932 Talbot avenue, on property which his father had pur- 
chased twenty-four years previously, and this has no\v been rebuilt. His 



590 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

daughter, Mrs. Lightner, now conducts a confectionery business in the same 
building. In poHtical matters Mr. Rothrauft' is a Democrat, and he is a 
member of the CathoHc Church. He married in January, 1863, Amanda, 
born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and 
Esther Ream, and they have celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. 
They have had children : Samuel, of Braddock ; William, now deceased, 
lived in Braddock; Charles, deceased; Mary Eleanor, widow of Joseph 
Ridge; Thomas, of New Castle; Laura, deceased; Adda, married Michael 
Gorman; Agnes, widow of Daniel Lightner, who died October 30, 1913; 
Gertrude, married James Christ, of Braddock; Albert, of Braddock; George, 
of Rankin; Frank, of Altoona; Bertha Lorena, married Leo Struif. Mrs. 
Lightner, mentioned above, has had children : Joseph Kenneth, Daniel Oli- 
ver, Charles Ralph, Ream, Agnes Lorena, died in infancy. 



Lewis N. Morgan is a member of a family drawn from 
MORGAN a number of races, a combination of the kind which seems 
to produce the most virile and dominant element in the 
population of the United States. On his father's side of the house he is 
descended from Welsh forebears, men representative of that stalwart race 
at its best, with their peculiar virtues of worthy industry and moral fervor. 
From his mother, on the other hand, he inherits English blood, the blood 
which laid the firm foundation of the social structure in this country. 

The Morgan family, however, has resided in the country for many 
generations, and has, indeed, grown up with the region of Western Penn- 
sylvania included in Allegheny, Beaver and Washington counties, so that 
it has become thoroughly identified with the life and traditions of that part 
of the world. 

(I) His paternal great-grandfather was John Morgan, a native of 
Wales, who came to the United States and settled in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, when that region was little more than unbroken wilderness, 
and the savage was still a threat. He was one of the pioneers of Western 
Pennsylvania, whose sturdy toil and undaunted courage made the opening 
up of that part of the country possible, and upon whose work the subse- 
quent great development there is primarily based. He had been a civil 
engineer in his native land, but in this new and undeveloped land he was 
obliged to supplement what work of engineering he could get with other 
kinds of occupation. Thus he became the owner and operator of a saw 
mill, and conducted a distillery also. He became as a result of these varied 
occupations a man of considerable wealth and owned a number of slaves, 
besides large tracts of land in the form of farms in Allegheny, Washington 
and Beaver counties. It was on one of these farms in Finley township, Alle- 
gheny count}', that he established his home and there eventually died. He 
married Betsey Rierdon, not less a pioneer than himself. 

(II) Dr. Charles D. Morgan, son of John Morgan, was a physician, 
who carried on a considerable practice in the region just beginning to open. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 591 

He was himself born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, as early a- iHf)2, 
and saw the first steps of Pittsburgh flevelopmcnt, continuing with un- 
diminished jjower to the ])resent day. lie married Matilda Vail, a native 
of West Virginia, born in Wheeling. ( )ne of their children was Lewi.-, X., 
of whom further. 

(III) Lewis N. Morgan, son of Dr. Charles D. Morgan, was born in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 1844, and there passed his entire life. He 
received his education in the schools of his native place, and afterwards 
became a ship carpenter, a trade in which he continued many years. On 
November 5, 1875, he went to the city of McKeesport and there made his 
home. He worked at a number of different occupations, until receiving 
his appointment to the police force, in McKeesport, and served on that 
body for twelve years, becoming at length chief of police for the city. He 
was a member of the Republican party, and very active in local politics. On 
the breaking out of the Civil War in 1861, Mr. Morgan enlisted in Com- 
pany G, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served in the Union army 
for over a year. Three of his brothers, Rush, Jefferson and Frank, enlisted 
at the same time, and the two latter, both of whom are now deceased, 
served through the entire conflict. While still a very young man Mr. Mor- 
gan married Amanda E. Taylor, a young lady not yet seventeen years of 
age, a native of Pittsburgh, where she was born in 1846, and who bore him 
three sons, as follows: Charles D., deceased; Lewis N., of whom further; 
Harry H., deceased. Mr. Morgan has always been a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, while Mrs. Morgan's affiliation is with the Pres- 
byterian Church. They are now living in retirement in McKeesport. 

(IV) Lewis N. (2) Morgan, the second and only surviving child of 
Lewis N. (i) and Amanda E. (Taylor) Morgan, was born January 19, 1864, 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He spent his childhood, up to the age of eleven 
years, in that city, and received a portion of his education there. In the 
year 1875 '"lis father removed to McKeesport, and there the boy resumed his 
studies in the public schools of that city. Upon completing his studies, he 
secured a position in the Tube Mills, where he remained until nineteen 
years of age. He then entered the grocery business and continued in the 
same for five years, prospering greatly during that time. In 1889, however, 
he give up this pursuit and turned to the hotel business in which he believed 
great opportunities M^ere to be found. In the meantime he had entered 
actively into politics, following the example of his father, and began to 
make himself known in the local councils of the Republican party. His 
great natural aptitude for management, which had always made him highly 
successful in the world of business, drew the attention of the important 
members of the party to him. and they began to perceive that here was a 
young man with whom to be reckoned. In the year 1900 he was his party's 
candidate for member of the city assembly and was elected triumphantly. 
This office he held to the entire satisfaction of his constituents for three 
years, and then accepted the Republican nomination for alderman. This 



592 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

was in 1903, and once more he was victorious in the election. The term 
of this office does not expire mitil 1920, and Mr. Morgan is now in the 
midst of performing his important and responsible functions, with ability 
and unimpeachable integrity. He is at present engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business, and is prospering greatly in that field. Besides his 
public duties and private business, Mr. Morgan is a man of varied tastes 
and activities, taking part in many aspects of the life of his community. 
One of his tastes is for horticulture, and his achievements in this line are 
very distinguished, and have brought him an honorary membership in the 
Luther Burbank Society of Santa Rosa, California. He is also a prominent 
fraternity man, a member of Aliquippa Lodge, No. 375, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and member of the Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Morgan married, July 13, 1888, Margaret J. Williams, daughter of 
Edward and Mary (Edwards) Williams, of Westmoreland, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Morgan was born in Irwin, Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. Morgan 
have been born two sons, as follows: i. Walter L., born July 29, 1890; 
educated in the public schools of McKeesport, and later in Dufif's Business 
College of McKeesport ; now assisting his father in his business. 2. Herbert 
E., born October 28, 1904; now a pupil in the McKeesport public schools. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morgan are staunch members of the Baptist Church, attend- 
ing the First Baptist Church of that denomination in McKeesport. They 
are active in the work in connection with the church body, and materially 
support its various dependent benevolences. They are rearing their chil- 
dren in this persuasion. 



The Engelhardts of Glenshaw, Allegheny county, 
ENGELHARDT Pennsylvania, are descendant of an old family of the 
Kingdom of Bavaria, since 1871, one of the leading 
states of the German Empire. John Engelhardt was taken prisoner 
by the French while serving in the German army and died soon after his 
release from confinement. He was a shoemaker by trade, married and 
reared a family of sons, among them, John Albert, father of Andrew Engel- 
hardt, of Glenshaw, Pennsylvania. 

(II) John Albert Engelhardt was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 7, 
1825, there grew to manhood, obtaining a good education and learned his 
father's trade, shoemaker. After coming to the United States in 1853 he 
settled in Lawrenceville, (now Pittsburgh) obtaining his first employment 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Later he worked for the firm of Siebert 
& Burg, then until 1873 conducted a shoemaker shop at the corner of 
Thirty-eighth and Butler streets in Pittsburgh. In 1873 he moved his resi- 
dence and business to Millvale, where he carried on a prosperous business 
until his retirement in 1893. He was an expert boot and shoemaker and 
drew his patronage from the best class of patrons, the era of factory-made 
boots and shoes not then having arrived. He was a member of the First 
Lutheran Church, and for many years was collector of taxes for Millvale. 



VVKSTKR.V I'lLWSYLVANIA 593 

IJc revisited his liavariaii liuiiic tliricc durinj^ h\-, later years and j^reatly 
enjoyed his sojourns amid the scenes of his youtli. lie died I'"ebruary 28, 
1904, deeply regretted by his many friends. 

He married, in 1853, Margaret I'opp, in I'itt^hurgli, soon after his ar- 
rival in that city from (jermany. She died November 28, 1897. Chiirlren : 
I. Anna Rebecca, born October 18, 1855, died aged two years. 2. Mary A., 
born February 18, 1857, married F. I'. Walther. 3. John Albert (2;, born 
March i, i860, married Sadie Datz. 4. John, born May 7, 1862, marric<l 
Mary Rickey, deceased. 5. Charles, btjrn December 20, 1864, died Novem- 
ber 3, 1865. 6. Andrew, of further mention. 7. Matthew, born April 3, 

1868, died November 22, 1901 ; married Margaret . 8. Louis Henry, 

born October 28, 1871, married (first) Margaret George, (second) Lottie 
Creather. 9. Rebecca Elizabeth, born February 9, 1874, married Frederick 
J. Grealman. 10. Gustav, born September 22, 1875, married Catherine 
Kamar. 

(HI) Andrew Engelhardt, sixth child and fourth son of John Albert 
and Margaret (Popp) Engelhardt, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
corner of Thirty-eighth and Butler streets, February 2, 1866. In 1873 his 
parents moved to Millvale, where he attended the public school. After 
finishing his school years he began working in the meat market, conducted 
by his brother-in-law, F. F. Walther, in Millvale, and there thoroughly 
learned the butcher business. Later he worked one year in Youngstown, 
Ohio, then returned to Pittsburgh, where for six years he was in the em- 
ploy of Philip Graver, butcher and retail meat dealer. At the end of this 
period Mr. Engelhardt, in partnership with William G. Fried, a nephew of 
Philip Graver, bought the business, but were associated but one year when 
Mr. Engelhardt became sole owner and so continues. He occupies stall No. 
24 in the Pittsburgh Public Market and conducts a large and profitable 
retail business. In 1906 Mr. Engelhardt bought a site in Glenshaw% and 
in 1907 erected thereon his present beautiful country home. He is a man of 
energy and thoroughly understands every detail of the business, also pos- 
sessing the good judgment and clear brain necessary to business success. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Glenshaw. and in political faith 
is a Republican. 

Mr. Engelhardt married, in November, 1892, Amelia, daughter of Adam 
and Catherine (Sauers) Ochsenhist, wdiose children are: i. Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Anton Riester. 2. Adam. 3. Charles, deceased. 4. Henry, deceased. 
5. Louisa, married Theodore Carson. 6. Jacob. 7. Catherine, married John 
Noble. 8. Amelia, married Andrew Engelhardt. 9. Anna, deceased. 10. 
William, deceased. All born in Louisville, Kentucky. Adam and Catherine 
Ochsenhist were born in Germany, emigrated to the United States, settled 
in Louisville and there resided until 188 1, then came to Pennsylvania, locat- 
ing in Pittsburgh. Children of Andrew and Amelia Engelhardt: i. Mar- 
garet Catherine, a teacher in the public schools in Shaler township. 2. 
^^'alter Frederick, a student at the University of Pittsburgh. 3. Edna 



594 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Elizabeth, a student at Pittsburgh North Side High School. 4. Robert Ed- 
ward. 5. Mildred Anna. 6. Andrew (2). 



George A. Sweitzer is a member of a family originating 
SWEITZER in the old French province of Alsace-Lorraine and repre- 
sentative of the characteristic virtues of that region, an 
unusual degree of industry, noticeable even among their proverbially thrifty 
neighbors, and the power of practically adapting ideas to the conduct of 
life. 

Henry Sweitzer, father of George A. Sweitzer, was born in Alsace- 
Lorraine, and there passed his youth and young manhood, but emigrated 
to the United States when he was twenty-seven years old, and settled in 
the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. Sweitzer Sr. proved his patriotism 
for his adopted country by enlisting in Company B, Sixty-second Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, at the outbreak of the Civil War, and 
served for two years in that historic struggle. He entered the army as a 
lieutenant, and was promoted to a captaincy, but resigned his commission 
upon the death of his wife in the year 1862. During this period he saw 
considerable active service, and took part in the battles of Bull Run, Seven 
Pines and the Wilderness. He was twice .wounded in the hand. Originally 
a tailor by trade, Mr. Sweitzer engaged in the grocery business, and was 
enabled to start with a very excellent establishment through the money be 
had saved up from his wages while in the army. He remained in the gro- 
cery business for twenty-five or thirty years, and was extremely success- 
ful, and finally retired and removed to Knoxville, Pennsylvania, where he 
died about 1893. He was a member of the Republican party and always 
took a keen interest in all political questions whether of local or national 
application. He was a member of Hays Post, No. 3, Grand Army of the 
Republic. Mr. Sweitzer married Barbara Heller, born in Byron, Germany, 
on the river Rhine. Miss Heller came to the United States as a girl, and 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, met Mr. Sweitzer and there was married to 
him in the old German Evangelical Church at Sixth avenue and Smithfield 
street. The young couple at first resided in the First Ward, Pittsburgh, 
later on Penn avenue and at length in the "South Side," where Mr. Sweitzer 
continued to make his home until his final retirement to Knoxville. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Sweitzer were born three children, as follows : Emma, 
who married William Henry Nierste, of old Allentown, now a part of 
Pittsburgh; George A., of whom further; Caroline, now Mrs. August 
Roth, also of Allentown. 

George A. Sweitzer, the second child and only son of Henry and Bar- 
bara (Heller) Sweitzer, was born February 21, 1857, in the First Ward, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He received his education at the Humbolt 
School in the "South Side," but when a boy of thirteen or fourteen years 
of age he left home and learning the barber's trade he soon set up a shop 
for himself in Lower Allegheny, on the corner of Beaver and Pennsylvania 



W]':STERN PENNSYLVANIA 595 

avenues. He prospered from the start, aiul later removed to Smithfield 
street, opposite the City Hall, in iSKo he went to (Jhicaj:(0, hut flid not 
remain there over a year, and upon his return to Pittsburgh, located in 
succession on Market street, I-'ifth avenue, near Smithfield street, and on 
Fourth avenue. His next venture was into quite a different line of busi- 
ness, but one in which he was even more successful. In 1901 he moved 
to Hayes Borough, Pennsylvania, and their applied for a hotel license. 
Three years later he i)urchased a hfitel, which he at once began to operate 
under the name of the Hotel Sweitzer, and where he has continued ever 
since. He is now one of the oldest hotel keepers of the town. Mr. Sweit- 
zer does not by any means confine his attention to the conduct of his busi- 
ness, but takes, on the contrary, the keenest interest in the general life of 
the town, and is prominent in the social and fraternal circles there. He is 
a member of the local lodges of the Order of Elks, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Free and Accepted Masons, the Order of Moose, the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, and the Turners of Homestead. Mr. Sw^eitzcr 
is unmarried. He is a member, as was his father before him, of the 
Lutheran Church, and is prominent in the work of that body. 



Michael Augustin was a native of Prussia, Germany, 
AUGUSTIN where his entire life was spent. He was a carpenter by 

trade. He married (first) Elizabeth Lorson, by whom he 
had eight children, and eight children by a second marriage. Of these only 
the following named came to America : Michael, of further mention ; Peter, 
now retired from business, and lives in St. Clair borough ; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried John Gorius ; Margaret, a half-sister of Michael, married (first) Chris- 
tian Mergan, now deceased, (second) George Dornbacher, also now de- 
ceased, and lives in St. Clair borough. 

(H) Michael (2) Augustin, son of Michael (i) and Elizabeth (Lor- 
son) Augustin, was born in Prussia, Germany, August 6, 1842, died in 1900. 
He came to the L'nited States at the age of twenty-two years, with his 
cousin, and made his home with him for a time. After his marriage he 
lived in what was at that time Lower St. Clair township. He was occupied 
as a miner until 1876, when he conducted a hotel on Carbon street for one 
year, then another on Southern avenue five years, and finally removed to 
where his widow is living at the present time, Nos. 145-47 Southern avenue. 
He was a strong Democrat, and he and his wife were members of St. 
Joseph's Catholic Church, and of several church societies. He married, 
in Pittsburgh, November 15, 1867, Wilhelmina Klein, born in Prussia. Oc- 
tober 5. 1847, 3^d who came to the United States with her parents in 1S4S. 
She was a daughter of Nicholas and Margaret (Pack) Klein, both born 
in Prussia, and came to the United States in April. 1848. when they settled 
at West Liberty and later removed to what is now Mount Oliver borough. 
Mr. Klein was a miner all his life after he arrived in this country, and is 
buried in St. Micliael's Cemeterv. Thev had children: Jacob, a book- 



59^ WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

keeper, died at Mount Oliver; Wilhelmina, mentioned above; John, a mer- 
chant, died at St: Clair borough; Barbara, died in a convent; Mary, died 
unmarried at Mount Oliver ; Nicholas, died at the age of eight years ; Peter, 
a painter, lives in Coraopolis ; Helena, married George Bullion and lives in 
Pittsburgh; Mary, died in a convent. Mr. and Mrs. Augustin had chil- 
dren: Marguerite, married John Ubinger and lives in Locust street; Jacob, 
died in infancy; John P., a shoe merchant in Mount Oliver, has served 
seven years as burgess ; Joseph J., of further mention ; Helen, married 
Louis Bregencer, and died at Pittsburgh ; Andrew, an iron molder, living in 
Carrick; Peter C, a barber, died in Mount Oliver; William, a painter, 
living in Pittsburgh; George, a barber, lives in Mount Oliver; Clara, died 
at the age of twenty-one years ; Alphonse, a machinist, lives at Beechview, a 
suburb; Edmund J. V., twin of Alphonse, a barber, living in Mount Oliver; 
Raymond G., lives with his mother. Mr. Augustin has thirty-four grand- 
children. 

(HI) Joseph J. Augustin, son of Michael (2) and Wilhelmina (Klein) 
Augustin, was born in Lower St. Clair township, now Mount Oliver bor- 
ough. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1873. He acquired 
his education in St. Joseph's Parochial School, and upon its completion be- 
came an architectural sheet mill worker, kn occupation which he followed 
for about six years. He then met with an accident which incapacitated 
him for further work in this direction, so in 1908 he established himself in 
business at No. 208 Southern avenue, selling newspapers, periodicals, con- 
fectionery, etc., and later removed to No. 143 on the same avenue. He is 
independent in his political opinions, and a member of the German Bene- 
ficial Union and the Washington Progressive Association. He and his wife 
are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. Mr. Augustin married, Jan- 
uary 15, 1901, Dorothy Clemens, born on the South Side, Pittsburgh, De- 
cember 5, 1876. They have no children. Mrs. Augustin is a daughter of 
George and Theresa (Glcckley) Clemens, both born in Germany, came to 
this country single, and married in Pittsburgh. He was a brewing master in 
his early days, filling this position for twenty-three years for the Nusser 
Brewing Company, and when they went out of business he held a similar 
one with the Duquesne Brewery until his death, November 21, 1913, at 
the age of sixty-five years. His widow still lives on Nusser street, South 
Side. They had children: Joseph, who died at the age of twenty-three 
years; Dorothy, who married Mr. Augustin, as mentioned above; Cather- 
ine, married Charles Slyke. and lives in Chicago, Illinois ; Mary, died at 
the age of two years ; George, in the employ of an automobile manufactur- 
ing company, lives at South Side; Theresa, married Harry Deckler, and 
lives in Mount Oliver borough ; Frank, a brush maker, lives in Mount 
Oliver borough; Clara, married Vincent Berg, and lives in East Liberty; 
John, in the employ of the Duquesne Brewery; Charles, unmarried. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 597 

The name of S])illnian is jjroljahly of Cjcrman origin, and 
SPJLLMAN the bearers of it have been resident here for a number of 

generations, and some of them have earned distinction in 
various fields of industry, notably in mercantile lines. 

Frederick Spillman was born in Frederick county, Maryland, in 1828, 
died in Martinsburg, West Virginia, December 24, 1905. He settled in 
Martinsburg after his marriage, and there engaged in mercantile business 
with which he was identified actively until his death, being at that time 
the oldest merchant in active business in that town. His business is now 
carried on by his two sons, William 11. and Frederick P. He was a staunch 
Republican, and took an active part in local political matters, was a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Mr. Spillman married Susan Snook, who is still living in Martin-,- 
burg. She is a daughter of Samuel and Harriet ( Smith ) Snook, both born 
in Berkley, Virginia. Mr. Snook was a cabinetmaker by trade, served as a 
soldier under General Stonewall Jackson, until disqualified by age, and 
died in Berkley. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
Church, and had children: Mary, now deceased, married Nathan H. Van- 
cleve; Susan, married Mr. Spillman, as mentioned above; Peyton H., a 
retired merchant of Atlanta, Georgia ; Henry D., died as a young man ; 
Charles S., a resident of Wheeling, West Virginia; Hattie, who died in 
Martinsburg in 1884, married J. C. Hutsler; Ella, became the second wife 
of H. N. Deatrick ; Elizabeth, who died in Martinsburg, married H. N. 
Deatrick; George M., proprietor of a department store, a resident of Wheel- 
ing, West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Spillman had children: William H., 
mentioned above, lives in Martinsburg; Annie, died at the age of three years; 
Mary, who died in Martinsburg, married George M. Hoke; Frederick P., 
mentioned above; Ella, married William S. Jolliffe. and lives in Morgan- 
town, West Virginia; Charles Owens, of further mention. 

Charles Owens Spillman, son of Frederick and Susan (Snook) Spill- 
man, was born in Martinsburg, West Virginia, August 22. 1874. He was 
educated in the public schools of his native town, and was graduated from 
them with honor. At the age of seventeen years he entered the emplov of 
the National Bank of Martinsburg, remaining with them for a period of two 
and a half years. Eight years were then spent as assistant cashier of the 
Merchants' and Farmers' Bank of Martinsburg. after which he became 
cashier of the Jeannette National Bank, at Jeannette. Pennsylvania, holding 
this oflfice until it went into liquidation in 1902. He then came to Allegheny. 
where he was one of the organizers of the Provident Trust Companv. and 
filled the office of secretary and treasurer for four vears. Becoming con- 
nected in a similar capacity with the Pennsylvania Light and Power Com- 
pany, he retained this office until they sold out in 19 12. Mr. Spillman. 
in association with a few other men in the Pittsburgh district, organized 
the Carrick Bank, a state bank, of which he has been the cashier since that 
time. Upon the organization of this bank it had a capital of $50,000. the 



598 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

first year's deposits were less than $50,000, and the annual deposit at the 
present time was $135,347. In 1913-14 the business of the bank had grown 
to such proportions, and everything connected with it was in so satisfactory 
a condition, that it was found advisable to erect a beautiful three-story 
brick building, on Brownsville Road, in Carrick. This has a frontage of 
forty-four feet, houses a drug store as well as the bank, and has two floors 
of fiats above. Mr. Spillman has also served as secretary and treasurer 
of the Union Ice Company, and the Allegheny Ice Company. In political 
matters he is Independent, and he is a member of Ionic Lodge, No. 525, 
Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. Spillman married, October 3, 1900, Wil- 
liamette, born in Martinsburg, daughter of William and Isora Blackwell, 
and they have one son, Charles Owens Jr., born January 25, 1902. 



This name with its various ways of spelling, as adopted by lo- 
SPEER cality or possibly errors in writing, appears to be distinctive of 
locality, as in Maine we find the direct spelling Spear, and in 
other parts of New England, Speare and Spears. In Pennsylvania and the 
southern states it is universally spelled Speer, in the west either Speer or 
Speers. In New Jersey Speir seems to have been the original spelling. 
Speer and Speir are the only spellings used by the immigrant ancestors — 
Speer by Scotch Covenanters, who came to America and settled in Penn- 
sylvania, and drifted south and west, and Speir by the Dutch. 

John Speer lived at Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, at 
an early day, probably coming to that section from the eastern part of the 
state. In his later days he was a manufacturer of bricks. He married 
Sarah Randolph. 

William H. Speer, son of John and Sarah (Randolph) Speer, was 
born near Elizabeth, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1838, 
died in Braddock, in the same county, December 17, 1904. He received his 
education at Osceola, Pennsylvania, then became a pilot on a tow boat, on 
the Ohio river, an occupation he followed many years. After his marriage 
he located in Elizabeth, lived there three years, then removed to Braddock, 
where he filled the office of deputy sheriff. Later he became clerk in the 
sheriff's office, and then clerk, in the clerk of courts office. About three 
years prior to his death he opened a store in Braddock, which he conducted 
successfully. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics, the Knights of Malta and the Grand 
Army of the Republic. At the outbreak of the Civil War, when President 
Lincoln issued the first call for volunteers, Mr. Speer enlisted for three 
months in Company C, Eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
and later for three years in Company G, Twelfth Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry. During one of the numerous engagements in which 
he participated, he was wounded in the shoulder. 

Mr. Speer married, in 1864, Alice M. Fritzius, born in Mifflin township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, on a farm directly opposite Port Perry, 




,^Jh^ /^?xAi-<_ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 599 

daughter of George and Eliza (Stewartj Fritzius ; granddaughter of John 
George and Catherine Fritzius, born in Germany, came to Philadelphia, 
and then located in Mififlin township; and granddaughter of Peter and 
Alice (Rodgers) Stewart, pioneer settlers of Pittsburgh. George Fritzius, 
father of Mrs. Speer, was an early burgess of Braddock. He moved to 
Port Perry about 1850, to Braddock in 1866, and in both places followed 
his trade as a carpenter. He was an active worker in the interests of the 
Republican party, and died in 1873. He had eight children. He was born 
in Philadelphia, while his wife was born in Pittsburgh. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Speer: i. Lydia E., deceased. 2. Randolph E., deceased; married 
Estella M. Sharp; two children: Elizabeth A. and William M. 3. Josiah 
E., of Zanesville, Ohio; married Lillie M. Kligensmith ; no issue. 4. Emma 
M., married E. N. Hall, of Braddock, Pennsylvania; one child, Alice Speer. 



The name of Walker has come to us from England, and 
WALKER while the family under discussion here has only come to 
this country in recent years, the name has been a familiar 
one in America for many generations. The name of Captain Richard Wal- 
ker, undoubtedly of English descent, is found on the records of Lynn, Mas- 
sachusetts, as early as 1630, when he was ensign of the local military com- 
pany. All the Walkers in America of English descent probably trace to 
the same ancestor. 

Thomas Walker was born near Manchester, England, where he ob- 
tained his education, and became a manufacturer of hats. He came to 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, about 1830, and had a hat establishment at the 
Scotch Hill Market, now the corner of Second and Grant streets. Later 
he removed to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, and there his death occurred. He 
married Sarah Harrison Berkenshire, and they became the parents of four 
sons and four daughters. 

Thomas (2) Walker, son of Thomas (i) and Sarah Harrison (Berken- 
shire) Walker, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1840. He ac- 
quired his education in the night schools of that city, and at an early age 
learned the machinists' trade with the Rees Hartupee Company. He com- 
menced with this company at the very bottom of the ladder, his first work 
being the wheeling of ashes. He remained about ten years with this con- 
cern, after which he was employed by Mr. Rees independently in his estab- 
lishment in Pittsburgh on the Allegheny river. At the time of the Civil 
War Mr. Walker established the brewing business of Fawcett & Walker. 
which was located on the present site of Kaufman's warehouse, on what 
was then Stevenson street, but, acting on the advice of Thomas Marshall. 
a well known attorney, he withdrew from this line of business. He then 
removed to Braddock, where he established a foundry in 1862, under the 
style of McVay & Walker, later incorporated under the name of the Mc- 
Vay-Walker Company, of which Mr. W^alker became the president, an 
office he is still filling with remarkable executive ability. He was formerly 



6oo WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

treasurer of the Pittsburgh Wire Company ; is now treasurer of the Colum- 
bia Steel & Shafting Company ; vice-president of the Union Insurance 
Company, of Pittsburgh; and president of the Merchants' Savings & Trust 
Company, of Pittsburgh. He now resides on Blufif street, Pittsburgh. He 
served as councilman of the city at the time the present system of water 
works was constructed, and is a member of the Masonic Fraternity. Mr. 
Walker married Amelia Cubbage, and has children : Alexander Cubbage, 
secretary and treasurer of the McVay- Walker Company; Thomas Algo, 
secretary of the Columbia Steel & Shafting Company. 



This line of the family of Kennedy was founded in Penn- 
KENNEDY sylvania, removing from Ohio, he with whom the record 
opens, James Kennedy, having been long a resident of 
Youngstown, in the latter state, living there in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century. He was a farmer in calling, owning and cultivating a wide extent 
of land, on a part of which has since been built a section of the city o£ 
Youngstown. He married Sarah Reid, and had children: i. James 
Bailey, a farmer, died near Youngstown, Ohio. 2. Thomas Walker, a 
farmer and iron master, died near Poland Center, Ohio. 3. Joseph Clark, 
only survivor of the children of James and Sarah (Reid) Kennedy, lives 
in Youngstown, Ohio. 4. William Harrison, a soldier of the Civil War, 
died in Etna, Pennsylvania, in 1913. 5. David S., of whom further. 6. 
Reid, deceased, father of D. S. Kennedy, of Munhall, Pennsylvania. 7. 
Goodwillie, a veteran of the Civil War, died a short time afterward from 
ailments contracted while in the service. 8. Eliza, married George Little, 
and died near Struthers, Ohio, aged eighty-nine years. 9. Margaret, mar- 
ried, and died in young womanhood. 10. Matilda, married a Mr. Cross- 
man, and died about 1912, aged eighty-seven years. 

(II) Rev. David S. Kennedy, son of James and Sarah (Reid) Kennedy, 
was born near Youngstown, Ohio, in 1834, died in DeKalb county, Illinois, 
in 1899. After a preparatory course he entered Westminster College, 
whence he was graduated in 1858, after which he matriculated at the Al- 
legheny Theological Seminary, subsequent to his graduation being ordained 
into the ministry of the United Presbyterian Church. His first charge was 
as pastor of the Center Church, near Midway, Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained until 1873, in that year going to Sewickley, 
continuing in the ministry in that place until December, 1878. The follow- 
ing' sixteen years he passed as pastor of the church in Somonauk, DeKalb 
county, Illinois, thereafter retiring from the ministry and living until his 
death on a farm he had purchased in that county, being there buried. 
Until late in his life he was a sturdy supporter of the Prohibition party, 
prior to his death forming allegiance with the Republican organization. 
While a resident of Sewickley he held membership on the local school 
board. He was a faithful and inspired minister, and the five years that 
he passed in retirement prior to his death were years of rest well earned 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 6oi 

by a life of blessed activity for the promotion of the Kingdom. As 
became a minister, he abounded in good works, but so gentle and sympa- 
thetic was his nature that had he been called to some other occupation 
much of his substance would liave been given to others less fortunate than 
he and much of his time spent in their service. During his life he prac- 
ticed with faith and fidelity the doctrines that he expounded from the pulpit, 
his life an inspiration to those in doubt, a revelation to those who thought 
they believed. During the Civil War Rev. David S. Kennedy was sent 
to the front by the Christian Commission as a chaplain-at-large, visiting 
the camps and hospitals and in all ways doing all of the good possible. 
His services were recognized by his admission to membership in the Grand 
Army of the Republic. 

He married Nancy W. Kelly, born near Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, in 
1838, now a resident of Oak Park. Illinois, who was with him a student 
in Westminster College, graduating in the same year, 1858. She is a 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Moore) Kelly, her father an early resi- 
dent of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, owning land which is the present 
site of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. Here his death occurred when he was 
but a young man, his wife attaining the age of eighty-three years. Chil- 
dren of John and Elizabeth (Moore) Kelly: i. John, a soldier in the 
Union army during the Civil War, now deceased, his home having been 
in Kansas. 2. Archie, died young. 3. Nancy W., of previous mention, 
married Rev. David S. Kennedy. 4. Mary, married Rev. Anderson, a 
minister of the United Presbyterian Church, located for a time at College 
Springs, Iowa. 5. Lydia, was twice married, her second husband being 
Samuel Trimble, and died at College Springs, Iowa, at an advanced age. 
Children of Rev. David S. and Nancy W. (Kelly) Kennedy: i. Sadie E., 
married T. C. Hare, a member of the old Pittsburgh firm of T. Hare & 
Son, and resides in Oak Park, Illinois, her husband deceased. 2. Belle, died 
unmarried in 1891, was a mission worker in Chicago, Illinois. 3. Harry, 
until recently general superintendent of a United States Steel Company 
blast furnace at Clairton, Pennsylvania, now general manager of a wagon 
manufacturing plant at DeKalb, Illinois. 4. Reid, of whom further. 5. 
Archie G., of DeKalb, Illinois, judge of the court of claims, to which po- 
sition he was appointed by Governor Dineen. 6. Minnie, died in 1899, un- 
married. 7. Matilda, unmarried, lives with her mother. 8. James, died 
in 1879, in boyhood. 9. Annie, married Dr. James Kleinschmid. and resides 
in Aledo, Illinois. 10. Thomas W.. in partnership with his brother. Judge 
Archie G. Kennedy, a real estate dealer of DeKalb, Illinois. 

(Ill) Reid Kennedy, son of Rev. David S. and Nancy W. (Kelly) 
Kennedy, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1865. 
He was educated in Westminster College, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1889. He had earned his college tuition and expenses by 
working in the steel mills of Homestead, and after his graduation he be- 
came a roller in the Armor Plate Mills, continuing thus for three years, 



6o2 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

then beginning real estate dealing. He contracted numerous other con- 
nections and this feature of his business life was gradually relegated to 
the background, the importance of his newer associations being much 
greater. Mr. Kennedy was one of the organizers of the Homestead Na- 
tional Bank, of which he later became president, and upon the organiza- 
tion of the Monongahela Trust Company in 1901 became its president, a 
position he has held to the present time. At about the same time Mr. 
Kennedy became associaed with Mr. W. M. Henderson in the Henderson 
Coal Company, his present position in the concern being that of secretary, 
the company's offices being in the Commonwealth Building of Pittsburgh. 
He is also secretary and treasurer of the Orient Coke Company, of Union- 
town, Pennsylvania. Mr. Kennedy is the owner of considerable real 
estate in Homestead, and is occasionally a party to transactions along this 
line, although his other bvisiness interests prevent his giving it his entire 
attention. 

His political belief is Republican, and for one term he served as burgess 
of Homestead. His interest in local affairs is strong and active, and in any 
project of civic improvement his support is always enthusiastically given. 
Mr. Kennedy is one of Homestead's successful business men, and he has 
risen to his position of responsibility and honor through innate qualities 
of determination and persistent courage, qualities that made their appear- 
ance in the gratification of his desire for a college education and that have 
made their influence felt throughout the latter years of his life. He pos- 
sesses a wide circle of business and social friends, in whose regard he has 
an assured place. 

Mr. Kennedy married, in December, 1901, Martha A., daughter of 
Lowrey West. She is a descendant of Colonel Alexander Lowrey, born in 
county Donegal, Ireland, in 1723, who came to America with his parents 
when six years of age and was reared at Donegal, Pennsylvania. He traded 
extensively with the Indians of the locality and became one of the seven- 
teen largest land owners in the colony. In 1758 he was one of General 
Forbes' guides on that officer's march to Fort Duquesne and was also the 
guide of Colonel Bouquet's force five years later. He narrowly escaped 
death in the massacre at Bushy Run, in 1762, living a most strenuous life 
during Revolutionary times because of his activity in behalf of the Ameri- 
can cause, and on September 10, 1777, was in command of the Lancaster 
county militia at the battle of Brandywine. He was a member of the 
convention which in 1776 framed the first constitution of the state of 
Pennsylvania, and for several years was a member of the general as- 
sembly, serving as senator for one term. In 1790 he was appointed a 
justice of the peace by Governor Mifflin, filling that position until his death, 
January 30, 1805. About the middle of the eighteenth century Colonel 
Lowrey built a stone house upon his three hundred and ninety-one acre 
estate near Marietta, in Lancaster county, which was known as Locust 
Grove and which is still in the possession of his descendants. 



WESTERN I'JlNNSYLVANIA 6^^3 

Mary Lowrcy, (laughter of Colonel Alexander Lowrey, married C first; 
Matthew Hay, and moved to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, prior to 1800, 
settling on land overlooking the Monongahela, a part of which is now oc- 
cupied by the borough of Homestead. After the death of her first husband 
she married again, her second husband being Joseph West, a slave owner 
of Pennsylvania, their home continuing on the farm in Allegheny county. 
Mary (Lowrey) West died and was buried in the old Lebanon Cemetery 
in Mififlin township, Joseph West married again, his second wife being 
Katherine Whittaker, and upon his death he was buried in the Franklin 
graveyard. Children of Joseph and Mary (Lowreyj West: i. Alexander, 
sold his share of the homestead to his brothers, Joseph and Matthew, and 
moved to Illinois, his death occurring on his farm on the Wabash river. 
2. Edward, disposed of his share of the home property in the same manner 
as did his brother, Alexander, and moved to Illinois, purchased a farm 
adjoining that of his brother, where he died. 3. Joseph, of whom further. 
4. Matthew, a farmer on part of the homestead, engaged in mercantile deal- 
ings in partnership with a Mr. Willock, an association that was later dis- 
continued, after which Matthew West returned to farming and was so 
engaged at his death. 

Joseph (2) West, son of Joseph (i) and Mary (Lowrey) West, was 
a farmer on part of the old homestead, and there died about 1872. He 
established a brickyard on the river near Brown's Station, and was its 
proprietor for about twenty years. He married Sallie, a sister of his 
father's wife, and had children: i. Martha, married Simpson Walker, and 
died in Washington, District of Columbia. 2. Sarah, married Joseph Mor- 
rell, and died in Winona, Minnesota. 3. Margaret, married Thomas Potter, 
and died on the old homestead. 4. Mary Ann, married Joseph Tuttle. and 
died in Pittsburgh. 5. Lowrey, father of Martha A. West, of previous 
mention. 6. Aaron, a physician, died in Illinois. 7. Edward, a river cap- 
tain, died in Homestead, Pennsylvania. 8. Alexander, a bricklayer, died 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, g. Matthew, a retired farmer, died in 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 10. Joseph, died in young manhood. 



Many of this name have come to the United States, and in 
BOYLE the Colonial period they were to be found in the various set- 
tlements. The family under discussion here came to this coun- 
try at a more recent date, and have already shown their worth as law- 
abiding citizens. 

(I) John Boyle, who was born in Ireland, came to America while he 
was still young. He located in Erie county, Pennsylvania, and was em- 
ployed on the railway. 

(II) Robert Boyle, son of John Boyle, was born in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania, and received his education in the public schools of Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania. In Cambria county he engaged as a school teacher 
at an early age, and in 1850 commenced the manufacture of charcoal, with 



6o4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

which industry he was identified three years. He then removed to Johns- 
town, and was connected with the Cambria Iron Company until his death. 
He married Sarah Sproul, born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Andrew and Nancy (Ripley) Sproul, both Americans by birth, who 
early made their home in Cambria county, where he was a farmer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Boyle had children : Allen Laughlin. who was in active service 
during the Civil War; Andrew J., of further mention; William; Eliza Jane, 
deceased ; Mary Ann ; David ; Oliver ; Sarah Catherine ; Charles ; Ginevra, 
deceased ; Susan ; Phoebe ; George ; John ; Robert. 

(Ill) Andrew J. Boyle, son of Robert and Sarah (Sproul) Boyle, 
was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1846. His edu- 
cation was acquired in the public schools of Cambria county, and at an 
early age he commenced to work at the blast furnaces, his duty being to 
carry water. At the age of thirteen years he was engaged there permanently 
during the summer uTOnths, but was able to attend the schools during the 
winter. He then went to Johnstown, and when his elder brother joined the 
Union army he took his place in the finishing department. He was em- 
ployed there until the new mills were built, when he went to "rolls," where 
he remained until the big strike. He then went to St. Louis. Missouri, 
where he worked three months in the Crondelett Works, an iron mill, and 
at the expiration of that time returned to Johnstown and cut ice during 
that winter. In 1874 he went to Braddock, Allegheny county. Pennsyl- 
vania, and was active in the construction work of the Edgar Thompson 
Steel Mills, and when these were completed became a roller there. After 
the death of Captain Jones, C. H. Schwab became general manager, and 
appointed Mr. Boyle to the position of night superintendent. Mr. Boyle 
filled this efficiently until 1909. In 1906 the company sent Mr. Boyle and 
his wife on a pleasure trip to Europe, and in 1909 he retired from active 
work. He built an excellent house about 1903 on Belle avenue. North 
Braddock, and is still living in it. He served as a member of the board 
of school directors for a period of thirteen years, and as a member of the 
common council of Braddock for three years. He is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
and of the Workmen of the World. 

Mr. Boyle married, in 1867, Jennie Kuntz, and they have had children: 
Lula May, Ida Ann, Emma Viola, Minnie May, Charles Frederick. Jennie. 
James Franklin, Efifie Gertrude, Alverta Pearl, Edgar F., Elmer N. 



The name of Adams is one which has gained distinction in 
ADAMS this country as well as in England and Ireland, from which 

it was brought here originally. There is no doubt that all 
bearing the name have had a common origin, some branches of the original 
family being established here in the early Colonial days, others coming 
at various other periods, but all have proved their worth and the pos- 
session of sterling qualities which have rendered them desirable citizens. 



VVICSTICRN' ri':\\SYLVANIA 605 

James Adams was born in Ireland, and eniif^ralcd lo America in liis 
youth. He married Mary Oxlcy, a native of I'ittsburgh, whose father 
was a Frenchman, and whose mother was Ijorn in Irelanrl. 'J'hey were 
early residents of Pittsburgh. 

George Adams, son of James and Mary (Oxleyj Adams, was born 
on Pike street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1854, died in 1895. lie received 
his education in the public schools of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, then 
learned the trade of stove molding, with which he was identifierl until his 
death. He married, January 6, 1881, Hannah Brojihy, born in Ireland, a 
daughter of Michael and Catherine (Henebryj Brophy, both natives of 
Ireland, the former a shoemaker, and granddaughter of John and Catherine 
(Size) Brophy; Mrs. Adams came to the United States in 1865. She is a 
wom(an of much energy and determination, and erected two fine houses on 
the site of the one she had occupied while her husband was still living. 
Mr. and Mrs. Adams had children: James W., living with his mother; 
John A. and Charles F., both deceased. 



Henry Herbel was born in Prussia, Germany, where he grew 
HERBEL to maturity and married. In 1849, with his wife, Philomena, 

and his children, he emigrated to the United States, and 
settled near Sligo. Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there found em- 
ployment in the glass works. He was industrious and economical, and 
when he had amassed a sufficient capital, he purchased a farm in Sack 
county, Wisconsin, where the remainder of his life was spent, and where 
he and his wife are buried. He was a staunch Republican, and he and 
his wife were devout members of the Presbyterian Church. They were 
the parents of children as follows : John George, of further mention : 
Emma, who married Jacob Able, died young ; Henry, who was a farmer 
in Marion, Indiana, is also deceased ; Conrad, a farmer of Marion. Indiana. 
now^ deceased ; Kate, married Henry Black, and died in Wisconsin. 

John George Herbel, son of Henry and Philomena Herbel. was the 
eldest child of his parents, and was born January 29, 1831. His school edu- 
cation was acquired in his native country, and he was about eighteen years 
of age when he arrived in America. He had served his apprenticeship 
as a tailor, and engaged in this occupation in this country, with a very 
satisfactory amount of success. For the greater part his work was custom 
trade in and around Pittsburgh. Politicall}^ he was a strong Republican, 
and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
He was also a member of a Pittsburgh Lodge. Free and Accepted Masons ; 
and of the Knights of Honor. His death occurred August 7. 1S83. Mr. 
Herbel married, in 1852. Margaret Buck, born in Bavaria. Germany. De- 
cember 24. 1833, and came to America with her parents when she was 
twelve years of age. About a year after the death of her husband she 
purchased a house on Dixon street. Plomestead. and lived in it until 1907. 
wdien she removed to No. 543 Ninth avenue, where she lives at the present 



6o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

time. She was originally a Lutheran, but became a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church about forty-six years ago, and has been unswerv- 
ing in her allegiance to this denomination since that time. Mr. and Mrs. 
Herbel had children : Lewis, who was a planing mill man, died in Pitts- 
burgh, leaving five children ; Caroline, married David Haf er, has twelve 
children, and lives in Denver, Colorado ; August, died in boyhood ; Henry, 
died in boyhood ; Frederick, a mill worker, lives in Homeville ; William, 
deceased, was a mill worker, lived in Homeville; Ida, died in infancy; 
George, assistant superintendent of a steel mill, lives in Homeville. 

Frederick Buck, father of Mrs. Herbel, was a native of Bavaria, Ger- 
many, and married Bertha, a native of the same section, who died in 
1842 ; he came to this country in 1845, with six of his children, and settled 
at Sligo, Pennsylvania. The sons found work in a glass concern, but 
Mr. Buck lived retired, and died 1853, and is buried in the old Allegheny 
Cemetery. He was of the Lutheran denomination. He had children: 
Maggie, who died unmarried in Germany; Thomas, a blacksmith, died in 
Germany ; Katherine, married Justus Walter, and died in Homestead, Penn- 
sylvania ; Christian, a farmer, died in Ohio ; Annie, married John Broad- 
right, and died in Homestead ; Coona, married John Reever, and died in 
Ohio ; Frederick, now retired, lives in Homestead ; Margaret, who married 
Mr. Herbel. 



George Lippert, of McKeesport, is a self-made man in the 
LIPPERT best sense of the word, having begun his career without 

capital or influential friends, with nothing to aid him but 
the determination to succeed, and at the present time (1914) he is owner 
of considerable property in McKeesport and is ranked among her representa- 
tive citizens. 

Michael Lippert, father of George Lippert, was a native of Germany, 
where he was reared and educated and also spent his entire lifetime, his 
death occurring there in 1900, at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. 
His wife, Gertrude (Miller) Lippert, also a native of Germany, who died 
in 1913, aged eighty-three years, bore him five children, all of whom are 
living at the present time : Edward ; Leonard, emigrated to the United 
States; George, of whom further; John, emigrated to the United States; 
Sophia. 

George Lippert was born in Germany, January 8, 1867. He attended 
the school in the vicinity of his home, acquiring a practical education, and 
in 1883, at the age of sixteen years, emigrated to the United States and 
located in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, in which city he has since resided, ' 
being well and favorably known in the community in which he resides. 
He secured employment in the W. Dewees Wood Iron Company, with 
which concern he was identified for seventeen years, and in 1900. at the 
expiration of that period of time, became the proprietor of the Lake Erie 
Hotel, located at Nos. 406-408 Walnut avenue. McKeesport, also becoming 



\ V I-: s'l" I-: R N I ' J •: x x s y l \ ' . \ x i a rxj7 

the owner (jf the proinrty, and has since condueted the same in a suc- 
cessful manner, ihe ijatnmage steadily increasing, owing to the fact that 
everything is done for llie comfort and pleasure of the patrons, the rooms 
are neat and cheerful in ajjpearance, and ihe tahle is supplied with tlie hcst 
the markets afford. Mr. Lipj^ert is one of the organizers and directors 
of the Mutual Union Brewery Company of Aliquippa, iieaver county, 
Pennsylvania, one of the leading industries of that place. lie is a com- 
municant of the Roman Catli(jlic Church, and a staunch adherent of the 
Repuhlican party, hut has never sought or held public office, preferring lo 
devote his entire time to his business pursuits. He is a man of substance 
and influence, and is held in high esteem by all who are brought in contact 
with him, either in public or private life. Mr. Li])pert is a member of the 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association, McKeesport Lodge, Benevolent anrl 
Protective Order of Elks, Fraternal Order of beagles, Loyal Order of Moose, 
also a member of the local Turn Verein. 

Mr. Lippert married, in 1888, Annie Weil, born in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Ludwig and Mary Weil, both of whom arc now de- 
ceased. They are the parents of three children, all living at the present 
time (1914): Mary Elizabeth, Leonard, George. 



Arthur Ball is one of a family which represents the best type 
BALL of English character, which, from the earliest days of Colonial 

history, has formed the solid foundation of the American citi- 
zenship, and upon which, today, we are erecting securely the amazing fabric 
of a population the most composite the world has ever known. 

Thomas Ball, father of Arthur Ball, was a native of Staft'ordshire, 
England. He began life as a miner in the coal deposits of his native region, 
and through sheer force of character and native ability, worked himself 
into the position of prominence in the adopted community across the sea. 
He soon rose from the rank of miner to be a foreman in the English mines, 
and in the year 1879 he came to the United States and settled in the city 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His first employment in this country was in 
the great steel works, the industry which has done so much to render the 
Pennsylvania city famous, but later he returned to his old occupation of 
coal mining at Banksville, Pennsylvania. He made this change about 1892. 
and it was not long before the skill derived from natural ability and long 
experience drew the attention of his superiors to him and he was once more 
given the position of foreman. But Mr. Ball was not content to remain 
employed in the service of others. His fertile brain was ever on the outlook 
for an opportunity to embark upon an independent enterprise, and it was 
not a great while before the occasion oft'ered. In 1906 he was the prime 
organizer of the Builders' Supply Company, and since that time has been 
actively engaged in managing this very flourishing business. He was the 
company's first president and has remained in that capacity ever since. To 
the original venture was later added a retail coal business, and the whole 



6o8 ' WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

enterprise has prospered greatly and now employs twenty men in its serv- 
ice. But Mr. Ball has not by any means confined his energies to the con- 
duct of his personal affairs. For a time he was a resident in Hays, Penn- 
sylvania, and while there took an active part in the local politics. He is 
a member of the Republican party and on that ticket was elected a mem- 
ber of the first borough council of Hays, and became its first president. 
Since 1904 he has lived in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania. He is a member 
of the local lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and of the Knights of 
Pythias. He married, while in England, Charlotte Burroughs, also a native 
of Staffordshire, and by her had ten children, as follows: Edward, now 
a resident of Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, where he is engaged in the in- 
surance business ; Rachel, deceased, became Mrs. Frederick W. Simmons, 
and died February, 1908; Sadie, unmarried, a teacher at West Homestead. 
Pennsylvania; Arthur, of whom further; Lottie, a school teacher, died at 
the age of twenty years ; a child who died in infancy ; Bertha, a musician, 
performer upon the piano and organ and a teacher of her art, lives at home 
with her parents; a child who died in infancy; Clifford, employed by a 
feed company and lives at home with his parents ; Albert, who resides 
with his parents and is employed in his father's business. 

Arthur Ball, fourth child of Thomas and Charlotte (Burroughs) Ball, 
was born February 25, 1879, in Staft'ordshire, England. His parents emig- 
rated to the United States, however, in the same year as his birth, and it 
thus happened that his earliest associations are with the state of Penn- 
sylvania in that picturesque region lying beyond the Allegheny Mountains. 
He received his education in the public schools of Banksville, Pennsylvania, 
and at an early age commenced work with his father in the collieries of 
that locality. During the time he was so employed he continued his studies, 
attending night school, a task which, considering the difficult nature of the 
work in the mines, must call for unqualified admiration. In the night school 
he applied himself diligently to the study of stenography, and later of 
bookkeeping. In 1907, as a result of these efforts, he secured a position 
with the Mercantile Trust Company of Pittsburgh, with which concern he 
remained five years, learning much that was to be of use to him in later 
years, of the conduct of the business of large financial institutions. He 
then accepted the oft'er of a better position with the Monongahela Trust 
Company of Homestead, Pennsylvania, and made his home in that city for 
a year. The skill which he displayed in the performance of his duties in 
these concerns did not pass unnoticed, and it was in 1904 that the Hays 
National Bank of Hays, Pennsylvania, offered him the position of cashier. 
This offer Mr. Ball at once accepted, and he has held the office ever since 
to the entire satisfaction of the n^anagement and the great advantage to 
the business. Some idea of the increase in the volume of business done by 
the bank since Mr. Ball became its cashier, an increase with which his skill 
and capability has had much to do, may be gained from the fact that at 
the beginning of the period the deposits of the bank amounted to $47,000, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 609 

while in the year 1913 they had grown to the sum ()i $174,000. When he 
accepted the position with the I lays concern, Mr. Ball removed his residence 
to that town, and has there made his home ever since. 

Besides his connection with the hank he has been made a director of 
the Builders' Supply Company, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, of which hi-, 
father is the president, and at one time he filled the office of treasurer to 
the same concern. Notwithstanding the great flemands which his business 
and financial associations make ujjon his time and attention, he gives gen- 
erously of both to the Hfe of his community in its various aspects. He is 
a member of the Republican party, and takes an active part in local politic.^ 
and the conduct of his community's affairs. His skill and experience in 
financial matters fit him for many difficult positions in the gift of the town, 
nor has he held back from accepting them. Just at present he is serving 
his fellow citizens in the capacity of borough treasurer, and as treasurer 
of the school district. He also occupies a prominent place in social and 
fraternal circles in his town, being a member of the local Masonic Lodge, 
the Knights of Pythias, and the Knights of Malta. 

Mr. Ball married, October 14, 1909, Bertha Olive May, a native of 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Ball is a daughter of Albert and 
Jennie (McKarney) May, of Sulphur Springs, Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Ball are the parents of one child, Charlotte May, 
born November 29, 19 10. Mr. Ball is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, while Mrs. Ball belongs to the Christian Church. 



The Rev. Father Holosnyay is a member of a race 
HOLOSNYAY which, although it has been represented in the past 
by a comparatively small element in the composite pop- 
ulation of the United States, has of recent years contributed a large and 
valuable addition to the formation of what in years to come will be the 
American race. The Kingdom of Hungary lies in a part of Europe, per- 
haps the least well known to the average American, a region, indeed, of 
which the very names sound to our ears like gates to the land of romance, 
the abode of Prince Florizel and his care-free crew. But despite this 
thoughtless impression, it is doubtful if there could be found in the world 
today a more practical and capable people than that of Piungary. The 
history of the land has been one long record of struggle for independence 
and recognition against powerful and oppressive neighbors, during the 
course of which their purpose has been accomplished and a wholesome 
respect for their ancient rights and privileges been impressed upon all with 
whom they came in contact. Today the Hungarians are chietly engaged in 
that basic industry, agriculture, and it is safe to assert that they are the 
equal of any farmers in the world in the practical use thev make of their 
land, and the high percentage of return they secure to the given area. 

Father Holosnyay, son of Antonio and Emelia Holosnyav. was born 
March 28, 1867, at Ungvar, Hungary, and here received his education. 



6io WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

His family had always belonged to the Greek Catholic Church, and he, 
being of a strongly religious nature, it was decided that his studies should 
be of such kind as to prepare him for the priesthood. Accordingly his 
education was pursued with this end in view, and in 1892 he was ordained 
a priest. For about seven years thereafter he spent his time ministering 
to the spiritual needs of the people of his own land, but in the year 1900 
he received a call from the United States, and to this new field of duty 
he at once repaired. Father Holosnyay arrived in the United States just 
at the opening of the twentieth century, and made the year an important 
anniversary in the history of the Greek Catholic Church in Pennsylvania 
by organizing the first congregation of the kind at Homestead, Allegheny 
county, in that state. Going to that city at once, upon reaching this country, 
he accomplished this work, the members of his little flock consisting of the 
hundred families, more or less, who shared his faith in the city of Home- 
stead. In a very short time the Church of St. John the Baptist was erected 
on Third avenue. This first building was very small but served the pur- 
poses of the congregation for about five years, when it became apparent 
that a larger building would be required. In the year 1905 a site on Dixon 
street between Eighth and Ninth avenues was chosen and the present 
beautiful church and parsonage were erected. The buildings are both in 
the Byzantine style of architecture, characteristic of the Greek Catholic 
churches the world over, and as usual with this style the detail is miost 
ornate. The interior particularly is very elaborately and beautifully dec- 
orated, being truly a monument to the artistic skill and taste of the designer 
and those who carried out his conception, and the whole church is a worthy 
place of worship for the devout congregation, which now numbers some 
five hundred families. Under the intelligent and efficient management of 
Father Holosnyay, the parish has not only grown numerically, but is a 
thriving, active religious center, holding out high promise of future develop- 
ment. Besides his firmly established place in the hearts of his congregation, 
and the good work he is doing in the home parish, Father Holosnyay is a 
conspicuous figure in the more general organization of the Greek Catholic 
Church in America, and holds the ofifice of director in the Greek Catholic 
Union of America, which has its headquarters in Homestead. 

Father Holosnyay is a naturalized American citizen, votes the Repub- 
lican ticket, is keenly interested in the questions of politics of the day and 
hour, both those of local and national significance, but most especially has 
he become wrapped up in the work that he is doing as priest here so far 
away from his native land, among those of his own faith and race, who 
have come to this far western republic to modify and enrich with their 
character, customs, traditions and religion, its evolving life. Father Hol- 
osnyay, himself, is a fine example of the type of man which these produce, 
earnest in his work, highly educated, possessing that genial courtesy which 
is well nigh the definition of the gentleman, and with an open heart for all 
men, even strangers, which is one of the last and best fruits of religion. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 6ii 

In the fornialion of tlic (Jrcck Catholic diocese of the United States of 
America, Father Holosnyay took a great part and for these worthy services 
he received from his bishop the title of canon; and has been chosen as one 
of the bishop's consultors and nominated as a deacon in Homestead district. 



The name of Wagner is identified with many enterpri-.es 
WAGNER of importance in this country, as well as in Germany, from 
which land the family came. The various members of the 
family have always, when occasion demanded, shown their worth as de- 
voted and patriotic citizens. 

Henry Wagner, who lived and died in Germyny, was the father of 
Henry Wagner, who was born near the river Rhine, Germany, and died in 
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, at the age of eighty-two years. He came to the 
United States in early boyhood and located at Sharpsburg, Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, later removing to Allegheny, in both places following his 
occupation of shoemaking. He married Mary Elizabeth Shide, born in 
Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and Catherine Shide, both 
natives of Germany, who came to America and located in Sharpsburg, 
where he was a carpenter and gardener, and where his death occurred. 

Henry J. Wagner, son of Henry and Mary Elizabeth (Shide) Wagner, 
was born in Allegheny City, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 26, 
1864. He was educated in the parochial schools of his native city, and upon 
the completion of his studies, entered the employ of the Erie Ice Company, 
of Allegheny, and Chautauqua Lake Ice Company, and is now secretary and 
treasurer of the Diamond Ice Company, of Braddock, Pennsylvania. He 
is an active and progressive man, and is at the present time a member of 
the Board of Health of Braddock, Pennsylvania. He is a devout member of 
the Catholic Church, to which he is a liberal contributor, and he is also a 
member of the following named organizations: Knights of Columbus, 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association, Knights of St. George, Knights of the 
Maccabees, and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. Mr. Wagner married, 
in 1888, Catherine Mary Elizabeth Heyle, of Allegheny City, and they have 
had children: Mary E., Joseph H., Edwin M., Gertrude M., Lucy }vl.. 
Agnes M., Catherine M. 



The name of Butler is well known in the United States. 
BUTLER Researches in Great Britain claim the descent from the fa- 
mous Duke of Ormond, who was lord lieutenant of Ireland. 
His descendants are numerous in various portions of Great Britain. Xo 
definite connection between this family and the one under discussion here 
can be established, but it is a reasonable supposition that they came of this 
well known stock. 

James Butler, born in Ireland, came to America about 1880. in order 
to establish a home for his family who were to follow later. He located 
at Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he found occupation 



6i2 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

as a furnace man in a steel mill, and died there about 1886. He married 
Mary Shehan, who came to America with the children in 1881, and died 
about 1888. They had four sons: i. Edward. 2. Richard J., of whom 
further. 3. John. 4. Peter, married Laura Joyce, and they have three 
children : Laura, Lawrence, deceased, and an infant not named. All the 
members of this family belonged to St. Thomas' Catholic Church. 

Richard J. Butler was born in Ireland, April 11, 1877. He was about 
four years of age when brought to this country by his mother, and he had 
but few educational advantages, these being acquired at the parochial 
schools of Braddock. At the early age of nine years he commenced the 
active work of life by carrying water to the blast furnace, and from this 
employment he gradually worked up to the position of a furnace man, and 
later becamie foreman, a position he retained until 1900, when he resigned 
in order to establish himself in the hotel business, with which he is still 
identified on Braddock avenue. He is a member of St. Thomas' Roman 
Catholic Church, and of the following organizations: Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Ancient Order of Hi- 
bernians, Turner Club and the Braddock Social Club. Mr. Butler married, 
in 1896, Mary McCarthy, and they have had children: Edward A., Joseph, 
Helen, Richard, James. 



The name of Brennan, or Branin, as it is sometimes spelled, 
BRENNAN has been known in Ireland for many generations, and the 

possessors of this honored name have their full share of 
that versatility and mother wit for which the sons of the Emerald Isle are so 
justly noted. 

(I) Thomas Brennan was a farmer in Ireland, and emigrated from 
that country to America. Later he returned to his native land and died 
there. He married Mary, a daughter of James and Ann (McDonald) 
Henry, also natives of Ireland, who emigrated to America, and made their 
home at Parkersburg, West Virginia, where he followed his occupation as 
a stone mason. 

(II) John Brennan, son of Thomas and Mary (Henry) Brennan, was 
born in Ireland, educated there, and became a skilled florist while in the 
employ of the Duke of Hampshire. He emigrated to America in 1881 or 
1882, and made his home at Oakland, now the Fourteenth Ward of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. He established himself in business as a florist, with 
which he was successfully identified until his death. He married Mary 
Gallagher, and they had four sons and three daughters: i. Martin, de- 
ceased. 2. Thomas. 3. Ellen, married W. L. Elford, and has children : 
John, Mary, Eleanor, Anita, William. 4. James P., of whom further. 5. 
Patrick J., married (first) Mary Boyle, one child, Mary; Mrs. Brennan 
<lied and he married (second) Minnie Rosetta. 6. Bessie, deceased; mar- 
ried M. J. Clochhloska. 7. Mary, deceased. 

(III) James P. Brennan, son of John and Mary (Gallagher) Brennan, 




yh//i<n/i r//H'rw(n 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 613 

was born in Ireland, October 16, 1868. His earlier education was received 
in Ireland, and it was completed in the public schools of Pittsburgh, lY-nn- 
sylvania. He was occupied in various ways until he had attained an age 
when he could become a member of the police force of Pittsburgh, was 
then appointed, and served for a jjeriod of six years. He then decided to 
establish himself in the hotel business, and he did this about 1894 at No. 
309 Thirteenth street, Braddock, Pennsylvania, at which place he is still 
located. His hotel is conducted along up-to-date lines, and is one of the 
finest of its kind and size in the section. Mr. P>rennan is also an extensive 
real estate dealer, in which line of business he Iia> also been eminently suc- 
cessful. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and he and his family are 
members of St. Thomas' Catholic Church. Mr. Brennan married, in 1903, 
Mary Forsythe, and they have had children: John, William, Howard, Mary 
Margaret, Robert, Betty, Paul. 



The Sherwin family has been ably represented in this 

SHERWIN country for several generations, and they have freely given 

their services in defense of the country of their adoption. 

John Sherwin, the first of this branch of the well known Sherwin fam- 
ily of England to come to this country, was born in Dunton, England, 
where he lived m,any years, died in Braddock, Pennsylvania, September 19, 
1899, and is buried in the Versailles Cemetery, at McKeesport. He emi- 
grated to America in 1844, bringing his family with him, and settled in Wil- 
kinsburg, Allegheny county. Pennsylvania. Later he removed to Lorain 
county, Ohio, lived there for three years, and owned a farm there, and an- 
other across the line in Lucas county, Ohio. In 1853 he returned to Penn- 
sylvania, and settled on Alcott avenue, Braddock, later removing to Brad- 
dock avenue, where he built a house in i860. This house stood there until 
1892, when the business section of the city having encroached upon this 
property, he had the house removed to the back of the lot, facing Wood 
Way, and it is there at the present time. Mr. Sherwin followed his trade 
of tailoring until his death. He married Hannah Ford, who died in Brad- 
dock. January 31, 1882, and is buried beside her husband. They had chil- 
dren : William, of further mention ; Mary, widow of Robert Bates, lives 
in Youngstown, Ohio ; John, died in Braddock ; Hannah, widow of George 
Van Horn, lives in Edgewood ; Elizabeth, married Joseph Jamison, and 
lives in Butler county. Pennsylvania ; George, died at the age of thirty-six 
years ; Sarah, married John Orr, and lives in Braddock ; Charlotte, mar- 
ried John Alexander, and lives in Plainview. Texas ; Samuel, died in infancy. 

William Sherwin, son of John and Hannah (Ford) Sherwin. was born 
in Leicestershire, England, May 4, 1844, died in Braddock. Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. He was an infant when brought to this country by his 
parents, and was the only child of his parents horn in England. After com- 
pleting his education, he worked in the mines in various capacities for a 
nuniber of years, and was then engaged in teaming for a time. Later he 



6i4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

became a merchant in Braddock, with which line of business he was con- 
nected until October, 1882, when he retired from business life. During the 
Civil War he served in Company M, Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Cavalry, his term being of six months' duration near the close of 
the war. He was very active in local political matters in the interests of 
the Republican party, served two years as a burgess, and for a number of 
years as a member of the school board and the common council. He and 
his wife were members of the United Brethren Church. In 1866 he be- 
came a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was still 
affiliated with it at the time of his death. 

Mr. Sherwin married (first) in 1867, Ann, born in England, died in 

1902, a daughter of John and Hester (Turner) Bates, the former coming 
to America in 1874, the latter died in England. They had children: Han- 
nah, married Charles Jones, both died in Braddock; William, who came to 
America in 1867, lives in Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Robert, now de- 
ceased, married Mary Sherwin; Mary, who came to America in i860, mar- 
ried Ozro Wilkison, both now deceased ; Ann, mentioned above ; Rebecca, 
married Edward White, and died in England ; Martha, who became the 
second wife of Mr. Sherwin; John Turner, who came to America in 1874, 
lives in Allison Park, Pennsylvania. Mr. Sherwin married (second) in 

1903, Martha, a sister of his first wife. There are no children by second 
marriage. By the first marriage there were : William Turner, an engineer 
by profession, married Mildred Barr, and has : May B., who married A. 
J. Pancook, and William Everett ; Hannah, lives in Braddock, married Wil- 
liam Stringer, has children: Robert, Albert and George; John W., lives 
in Braddock, is a draughtsman, married Victoria De Nardo ; George, a 
bookkeeper, lives in Monessen, married Charlotte Williams, and has a 
daughter, Charlotte G. ; Robert, a bookkeeper, rrtarried Mary Major, has 
children : Robert, George, Martha, William, and lives in Monessen. 



Some branches of the Diehl family have been represented in 
DIEHL this country for many generations, and they have all brought 

with them from their native land of Germany, and transmitted 
to their descendants, those habits of thrift, industry and integrity which 
are so characteristic of the natives of that country. 

Peter Diehl was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and emigrated to 
the United States in the early part of the nineteenth century. He settled at 
Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in farming. 
Thrifty, economical and industrious, his savings soon amounted to a con- 
siderable little capital, and he then settled in Pittsburgh, and later in But- 
ler county on a farm. He later took a position in the iron mill of Jones & 
Laughlin, in Pittsburgh, but had only held this a few days when he sud- 
denly died. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the German 

Protestant Church. He married Mary and of their two children, 

Philip was killed in an accident, on South Side, when about fifty or fifty- 
five years of age, and Adam, of whom further. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 615 

Adam Dichl was born at Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
August 17, 1837, died December 3, 1908. His entire attendance at schrx)ls 
consisted of three days spent there, and he is in the truest sense of the word 
a self-educated man. Naturally of an ambitious and energetic nature, he 
overcame the obstacles which lay in his path to an education in his early 
youth, and at the time of his death was one of the best read men in his 
section, well informed on all important questions of the day, and a more 
than ordinarily fine matliematiciaii. About 1874 he opened a grocery store 
at Fourteenth and Carson streets, but shortly afterward removed to Sarah 
street, where he conducted a grocery and a feed store near to each other, 
and was personally identified with these until he retired from business in 
1893. In 1899 he purchased one and three-quarter acres in Baldwin town- 
ship, on Brownsville road, now Carrick borough, and there his death oc- 
curred. He was a leader in the organization of Carrick borough, and was 
elected its first burgess. He was a director of the Birmingham Fire In- 
surance Company; director and treasurer of the Keystone Brewery; treas- 
urer of the local lodge, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; treas- 
urer of the Masonic Mutual Association. He was a member of the Ger- 
man Evangelical Church, of which he was treasurer upwards of thirty 
years, and of which his wife is a member, and he was chiefly instrumental in 
making the purchase of the German Evangelical Cem.etery in Carrick bor- 
ough. 

Mr. Diehl married, April 2, 1856, Philippina Sutter, born in Germany, 
March 30, 1841, and brought to this country by her parents the fol- 
lowing year. She is the daughter of Peter and Philippina (Doeckler) Sut- 
ter, the former a shoemaker all his life. Both were born in Germany, 
died on South Side, and are buried in the German Evangelical Cemetery. 
Mr. and Mrs. Diehl became the parents of children as follows: Amelia, 
married W. H. Shaffer, and lives in Carrick; Philip, died in infancy; 
George, a gold mine operator, lives in Carrick ; Jacob, Caroline and Henry, 
died in infancy ; Louis, a feed merchant, resides in Carrick ; Matilda, mar- 
ried Lawrence Schaefer, and lives with her mother; Lillian, married Wal- 
ter Hartman, and lives with her mother. At the time of the death of Mr. 
Diehl, the directors of the Birmingham Fire Insurance Company sent a 
morocco-bound memorial volume to the Diehl family, expressing their 
appreciation of the services of Mr. Diehl in his business life, and as a man, 
in civic and religious life. The family prizes this very highly, as it indi- 
cates the opinion held of him by his fellowmen, especially those with whom 
he had close business relations. 



To the country of Sweden we owe much of the early 
BURKMAN prosperity of this country, especially in the states of Penn- 
sylvania, New York and New Jersey, and to those who 
have come to the United States in more recent years, no less credit is due 
for the admirable qualities of industry, thrift and integrity which they 
have brought here. 



6i6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Johannes Burkman spent his entire hfe in Sweden, and was engaged 
in conducting a general store. In later years he became the owner of a 
farm, which he cultivated with much success. He married Pamelia John- 
son, also a native of Sweden, where her death occurred. They had chil- 
dren : Swan; August; John, of further mention; Alfred; Adolph ; Au- 
gusta, lives in Sweden; Josephine, lives in Sweden; Hannah, deceased. 

John Burkman was born in Sweden, May i, i860. He was educated 
in his native land, where he remained until he had attained his majority, 
then in 1881 he emigrated to the United States and made his way at once 
to Braddock, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he arrived May 8, 
and at once found employment in the Carnegie Steel Works, where he re- 
mained six years. He then established himself in the grocery business, with 
which he has been successfully identified since that time. Five years after 
establishing this business, he erected the brick building at the corner of 
Ninth and Washington streets. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, 
to which he is a liberal contributor, and is also a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows ; Royal Arcanum ; Swedish Society ; Scandinavia 
Society of America, in which order he has been treasurer of the Supreme 
Lodge for the past twelve years. Mr. Turkman married, July 31, 1885, 
Lydia Peterson, of Sweden, and they have had children : Edgar, is in the 
emiploy of his father; Charles, a salesman, of North Braddock; Gertrude; 
Paul, attends high school ; Elmer, attends the elementary public schools. 



John Lovett was born, lived and died in Staflfordshire, Eng- 
LOVETT land, where he was occupied during the active years of his 

life as a laborer. He married Ruth Chatterton, and had chil- 
dren : Joseph, of further mention ; Ralph, John, Sarah, Jane, Mary, Ellen. 
Joseph Lovett, son of John and Ruth (Chatterton) Lovett, was born in 
Cheshire, England, September 9, 1840, died in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, 
June 9, 191 1. He emigrated to America in 1869, settling at Sandy Creek, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his occupation as a 
painter. Later he opened a wall paper store in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, 
this being the first store of this kind in the town, and conducted this with 
great success until his death, since which time his widow has been carrying 
on the business. Mr. Lovett married, in England, Nancy Howard, descend- 
ant of an old family, and had children: John H., born in England in 1862, 
married Maude Erwin ; Ralph E., born in 1865; Charles, Benjamin, Wal- 
ter, Harry. Emily, Lillian. 



David Dorleman was born at Frank fort-on-the-Main, 
DORLEMAN Germany, October 20, 1828, died in Mount Oliver, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, December 24, 1913. His 
mother died when he was but five years of age and he was raised to maturity 
by an elder sister and his father. He served in the German army for a time, 
and remained in Germany until about i860, when he emigrated to the United 



WESTI'.RN I'I'IXXSYLVAXIA 617 

States and settled in J'ittsburgli, in tlie section then known as Riceville. He 
was a cabinet maker by trade, and followed this calling successfully until 
about 1873. In 1864 he had purchased two acres of land in what was then 
Lower St. Clair townshij), now Alount Cjliver borough, anrl in 1873, when 
he abandoned cabinet making, he selected gardening as his future occuj^a- 
tion, of which he had made a sludy for some time previously. He built one 
greenhouse, to commence with, and finding his methods successful almost 
beyond his expectations, he built another, etc., and was identified with this 
industry until his death. He and his wife were members of St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church, and he had at one time been a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Dorleman married (first) , who died May i, 1894, and he mar- 
ried (second) July 26, 1894, Mary (Nauman) Markman. a daughter of 
Henry and Elizabeth (Flock) Nauman, natives of Germany, who came to 
America in i860, settled in Pittsburgh, where Mrs. Dorleman was born in 
1861. Mrs. Dorleman had married (first) in 1882, Nicholas Markman, 
who died June 23, 1887, and by this marriage there were children: Elea- 
nora, married John Loadman, and has children: James, May and John: 
Ida, died in 1888 at the age of ten weeks. 



Mayer is a name of frequent occurrence in this country, and 
MAYER was mainly brought here from Germany, as well as the 
varied forms of spelling, such as Meyer, !Myer, Myers, 
Maier, Meier, etc. 

John Mayer was born in Wuerttemberg, Germany, in 1800. where he 
learned the trade of shoemaking, a calling with which he was identified in 
Germany all his life. He and his wife were members of the Catholic Church. 
He married Barbara Kestler, also born in Wuerttemberg in 1800. and they 
had fifteen children, of whom the following named grew to maturity: 
Leonard, a priest of the Benedictine Order, died in Elizabeth, Pennsylvania: 
Wilhelmina, married George Plertzog. and died in Germany ; Joseph, died 
in New York City in 1912; Fredericka. married John Hise, and died in 
Germany; Charles, who was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in 
the Fifth United States Infantry, died while in the regular army; William, 
of further mention ; Juliane. married a Mr. Waltz, and died in Germany. 

William Mayer, son of John and Barbara (Kestler) Mayer, was born 
in Wuerttemberg, Germany, May 18. 1840. He received his education in 
the parochial schools of his native country. At the age of sixteen years 
he came to the L^nited States, and completed his education at St. Vincent's 
College. He then engaged in the profession of teaching, the various fields 
in which he labored being as follows : Pine Creek. Allegheny county. 
Pennsylvania : Tonawanda. Erie county. New York : Richmond, \ irginia ; 
St. Joseph's School, Allegheny, Pennsylvania; Bloomfield School, in Pitts- 
burgh; Temperanceville, Pennsylvania; St. Peter's School, South Side, 
Pittsburgh. In t88o he came to Braddock, Pennsylvania, taught there for 



6i8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

some years, and played the organ in St. Joseph's Church for a number of 
years, resigning the position of organist in 1906. In 1883 he established 
himself in the saloon business, continuing this successfully until 1906, when 
he retired from active business life. Politically he is a Democrat, fraternally 
a Knight of St. George, and he and his wife are members of St. Joseph's 
Catholic Church. 

Mr. Mayer married, in 1865, Emma T. Passaquay, born at Niagara 
Falls, Niagara county, New York, September 8, 1846, died in 1909. She 
was a daughter of Felix and Melanie (Heinz) Passaquay, the former born 
in St. Louis, Missouri, of Spannish descent, the latter born in France, and 
they lived all of their married lives at Niagara Falls, where he was a well 
known and reliable guide, and conducted an art store. Mr. and Mrs. Mayer 
had children : William, a bandmaster, lives in Knoxville, Allegheny county, 
married Anna Beckman, children, Dr. William H., and Melanie, a school 
teacher ; Mary, died in infancy ; Joseph L., a musician, living in Braddock, 
married Elizabeth Loew, no children ; Emma and Leonard, living with 
father ; John, a noted flutist, also lives with his father ; Felix, died at the 
age of two and a half years. 



This family has been represented in this country but a few 
WIGMAN generations, but they have beneficially influenced business 

in several directions, and their worth to the community 
has been shown. 

John Henry Wigman was born in Hanover, Germany, and there he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, being the owner of a small farm. In 1846 
he came to America, bringing some of his children with him, and there set 
to work to prepare a home for his wife and the others of the family. He 
located at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where he was a boatman on the Ohio 
river, and died during the cholera epidemic of those years. While still 
living in Germany, in addition to cultivating his farm, he had been accus- 
tomed to take charge of the mail service in his section during the winter 
months. He married Christina Mohrhoflf, born in Prussia. Germany, died 
in Hanover, Germany, while her husband was in America. Both were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church. They had six children, three of whom died 
young in Germany. The others were: i. William, of further mention. 2. 
George L., who came to America after the death of his mother, and was 
engaged in the grocery business for some years in Allegheny : later he re- 
moved to Pattersons Mills, Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he was 
also a grocer, and the postmaster of the town ; he died there in 1905 ; he 
was the father of twelve children. 3. Wilhelmina, who died in Allegheny 
in 1895; married Henry Abler, and had thirteen children, of whom five are 
now living. 

William Wigman, son of John Henry and Christina (Mohrhofif) Wig- 
man, was born in Hanover, Germany, August 6, 1832. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native land. He came to America in 1848, and 
for two summers worked in a brick yard, then learned the carpenter's trade, 




//-c-6£c^-^^ /AUi 




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 619 

which he followed for some time. In 1865, in association with James Mc- 
Masters, Harry Gearing, Samuel Hamilton, George D. Sharp, Henry Winkle, 
William Hunter, D. F. Schuette anrl Frederick Baxmeyer, organized a 
corporation known as The Union Planing Mill, of which Mr. Wigman was 
manager until 1882, and then elected president, an office he held until the 
association was dissolved in 1895. This concern, which was located at Xo. 
48 South Eighteenth street, started in a small way with a capital of $20,000, 
every member of the association being a carpenter with the exception of Mr. 
Baxmeyer. The business grew to large proportions, and when the town of 
Wilmerding was built, the Union Planing Mill Company did all the mill 
work for the Westinghouse Works. They made a specialty of shop work, 
and accomplished wonderful results in hardwood finishing materials. In 
1895 Mr. Wigman purchased the mill yard from the company, which had 
then dissolved, tore down the mill, and erected a retail business on the 
corner of Eighteenth and Fox streets, the lot being one hundred and twenty 
by one hundred and ninety-two feet. He took his eldest son into partner- 
ship, and the concern was known as the Wigman Lumber Company, and is 
so known at the present time. In more recent years a small mill has been 
added as an adjunct to this large business. Mr. Wigman retired from the 
active personal conduct of affairs in 1909, and since then his son has had 
sole charge of afifairs. He has lived in Carrick since 1906, and there has 
built a comfortable, buff brick house on the Boulevard. In political matters 
he has always been a staunch Republican, and has served as school director 
in the old Twenty-eighth ward. He and his wife both affiliated with the 
German Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Wigman married, January 3, 1856, Caroline Logeman, born in 
Prussia, Germany, died August 27, 1907. She was a daughter of William 
and Margaret (Langhorst) Logeman, who came to America in 1847 and 
settled in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where he died of cholera in 1852, and 
his widow married (second) Frederick Baxmeyer, and died in Carrick. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Wigman were: Mary, died in infancy; Elizabeth ; 
Wilhelmina ; two sons and one daughter, died in infancy; a daughter; Annie. 
bom January 30, i86r, died in Carrick, unmarried, February i, 1908; Wil- 
liam Henry, who succeeded his father in the lumber business, married 
Gwendolen Prosser, and has children, Dorothy and Donald; Harry F., a 
resident of Knoxville, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, is cashier of the 
People's Trust Company, and married Alma Hamm, and has had children: 
Ruth, James, Helen and Harry ; Caroline, lives in Brookline, married Fred- 
erick Klinzing, and has daughters : Elizabeth and Annie ; Edward, lives 
with his father in Carrick, is a traveling salesman for the lumber company, 
married Bertha Rattelman, and has children : Robert, Edward, Louise. 



This name is probably a variation of Dinsmore or Dins- 
DENSMORE moor, the more common forms. It is among the noted 
Scotch-Irish families which have contributed many promi- 
nent citizens to Pennsylvania as well as to many other states. 



620 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(I) Robert Densmore was born in Scotland, and very shortly after his 
marriage emigrated to the United States, where all his children were born. 
He settled at \'alley Eurnace, and later moved to Fayette county, Penn- 
sylvania, making his home at Fairchance, where he and his wife died and 
are buried. lie married Hannah Glenn, also born in Scotland, and they 
had children: Nathaniel, died in Fairchance, many years ago; Elizabeth, 
married a ]Mr. Warman, and died in Fairchance; Samuel, is retired from 
business affairs, and lives in Youngstown, Ohio; Hughes Oliphant, of further 
mention. 

(H) Hughes Oliphant Densmore, son of Robert and Hannah (Glenn) 
Densmore. was born in Fairchance, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, February 
14, 1841. In his earlier years he was employed in a rolling mill in Pitts- 
burgh, retaining this connection many years. He then became engineer in 
the power house of the H. C. Frick Company, at Fairchance, where he is 
still living. The Pittsburgh firm for whom he worked for thirty-eight years 
was Chess, Cook & Company. He is a Democrat, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, and the Protected Home Circle, and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married Elizabeth, a daughter 
of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ryland) Goldsborough, who were both born in 
IVIaryland, but were early settlers in Fairchance, and who had children : 
Eliza, married Bard Abel, and lives in Fairchance ; William, died in Fair- 
chance; John, lives retired in Fairchance; Julia, now deceased, married John 
Wilson; Elizabeth, who married Mr. Densmore, as above stated; Margaret, 
married Frank Rogers, and died in Fairchance ; Harriet, married Samuel 
Shinaberry, and died in Fairchance; Robert and Burton, died in Fairchance; 
George, a carpenter, resides in Fairchance ; Ellen, died unmarried ; and 
three others, whose names are not given. Mr. and Mrs. Densmore had 
nine children, of whom the following named attained maturity : Harry 
Thomas, of further mention ; William, is a boss at the tube works, and 
lives in Carrick. 

(Ill) Harry Thomas Densmore, son of Hughes Oliphant and Eliza- 
beth (Goldsborough) Densmore, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 9, 1864, died in Carrick, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, August 
4, 1912. He was educated in the public schools, and upon the completion 
of his education obtained a position in the same mill in which his father 
was working, and remained there sixteen years. He then entered the employ 
of the Carnegie Steel Company, at Homestead, becoming head clerk in the 
shipping department, and held this position until very shortly before his 
death. His residence, however, was at Carrick. He was an active worker 
in the interests of the Republican party, and was president of the board of 
health of Carrick at the time of his death. In 1901 he had built a fine house 
at No. 1035 Brownsville road, Carrick, and in this he was living when his 
death occurred. He was a member of the Protected Home Circle and of 
the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and he and his wife 
were members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Densmore married, No- 
vember 2, 1 88?? Sophia, born in Pittsburgh, a daughter of Benjamin and 



wrstilrn Pennsylvania 621 

Sarah (lloffnianj Vandcrj^rift, and tlicy liad cliildrcn : Jiciijainni, ijorn 
June 19, 1885, is a draughtsman for the Westinghousc Company, and is 
unmarried ; Elsie Ehzabeth, also living with her mother. 

(Tlif ViUKlfTgrlft Line.) 

Jacob Vandergrift, a native of Holland, came from Amsterdam in 
that country, in 1664, and settled in New York City, where he lived and died. 
From him the Pennsylvania Vandergrifts are descenrled. 

(I) Jacob Vandergrift, a lineal descendant of the immigrant ancestor, 
came to Pittsburgh, with his wife, from the eastern part of Pennsylvania, 
prior to 1800. He was a boat builder and constructed the first steamboat 
to go down the Ohio river. He resided on the North Side, and continued 
actively as a boat builder until his death. He married, in Philadelphia, 
Mary Hart, a granddaughter of John Hart, one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

(II) William K. Vandergrift, son of Jacob anrl Mary ("Hart) Vanrler- 
grift, was born on North Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1805, 
died at Oil City, Pennsylvania, February 18. 1877. He grew to maturity 
in his native city, then became associated with his father in the boat building 
business, from which, however, he retired rather early in life. He mar- 
ried Sophia Sarver, born on North Side, Pittsburgh, July 5, 1804, died at 
East End, Pittsburgh, June 19, 1895. 

(III) Benjamin Vandergrift, son of William K. and Sophia (Sarver) 
Vandergrift, was born July 29, 1833, at South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, died November 5, 1862. He was a captain on a river boat, and died a 
year after his marriage from the effects of yellow fever, contracted while 
in the South. He married, December 25, i86r, Sarah HoiTman, born on 
South Side, Pittsburgh, September 30, 1841, died May 5, 1909. They had 
one child: Sophia, of further mention. Mrs. Vandergrift was a daughter 
of Joseph and Catherine (Page) Hoffman, early residents of Pittsburgh, 
when South Side was all farm land. He was a machinist, and followed 
his calling until he was about fifty years of age. Mrs. \^andergrift married 
(second) Samuel Wheaton, who died in 1908, and by this marriage she 
had children : John, a river man living in Carrick, who married Mrs. Annie 
Garland; Joseph, also a river man, is unmarried, and lives in Carrick: 
Samuel, a river man, lives in Carrick, and married Margaret Riter ; Grace, 
married Frederick Stone, and lives at Point Pleasant, West Mrginia. 

(IV) Sophia Vandergrift, only child of Benjamin and Sarah (Hoff- 
man) Vandergrift, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, November 2. 1862, 
and in that city received her education. She is a woman of much public 
spirit and a natural grace and charm of manner, which endear her to all with 
whom she comes in contact. She married Harry Thomas Densmore. She 
and her children are members of the Society of the Descendants of the 
Signers of the Declaration of Independence, she and her daughter are mem^ 
bers of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and her son i? a member 
of the Sons of the American Revolution. Mrs. Densmore is also an active 
worker in church matters, and all affairs of a charitable nature, or which 



622 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

further the welfare of the community in any manner, engages a share of her 
time, service and attention. 



The particular branch of the Rose family, under discussion 
ROSE here, has been in this country almost a century, greatly to the 
benefit of the numerous communities in which various members 
of the family have resided, where they have borne their share in the de- 
velopment and improvement of the section. 

Thomas Rose, who was born in Northamptonshire, England, about 
l8ii, was brought to America by his parents when he was about ten years 
of age. His earlier years in the United States were spent in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, where he learned the trade of shoemaking, which he followed 
there until about 1832. He then made his way to Pittsburgh, on foot, and 
as he was obliged to support himself by working at his trade while making 
this journey, progress was necessarily somewhat slow, and he spent two 
years en route. Upon his arrival in Pittsburgh he continued as a manufac- 
turer of shoes until 1839, then opened a store near the market house, re- 
maining in this business for a period of forty-seven years, at which time 
he was the oldest merchant in Pittsburgh. His death occurred in 1886 and 
he is buried in Homewood Cemetery. He was a Republican, and a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he had passed through all the 
chairs in the Masonic Fraternity. Mr. Rose married Amelia Glenn, of 
English descent, born in Rochester, New York, about 181 1, and they had 
children : Elizabeth, married Frank Harland, and died in Brushton, Penn- 
sylvania ; Amelia, married John M. Buck, and died in Brushton ; William, 
a shoe merchant, died in Braddock; James, a shoe merchant, died in Pitts- 
burgh ; Albert N., a shoe merchant, died at Mount Lebanon ; Charlotta, 
widow of James Dean, lives in Brushton; Charles, of further mention; 
Alice, married Lawrence Sloan, and died in Bellevue ; Emma, married James 
Taylor, lives in Brushton ; Kate, married Samuel Gracey, and lives on the 
Allegheny river, a few miles from Pittsburgh ; Margaret, a widow, lives in 
Brushton ; Ida, died in childhood ; Thomas H., lives in Brushton and is a 
clerk in the Homestead Steel Works. 

Charles Rose, son of Thomas and Amelia (Glenn) Rose, was born in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1849. He attended the public schools 
until the age of eleven years, when he commenced assisting his father in 
the shoe manufacturing business, and was thus occupied until 1881. In 
the meantime his brother William had died, and Charles Rose was sent to 
Braddock to take charge of the business which had been established there, 
at the corner of Ninth street and Braddock avenue. He remained in this 
locality six years, then moved the business across the street, where he has 
been successfully engaged since that time. He is now the oldest retail 
shoe dealer in the entire town. He gives his political support to the Re- 
publican party, and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
for many years, during this period serving once as trustee. In 1891 he 
built a commodious house at No. 419 Holland avenue, in which he still 



WESTKRN PENNSYLVANIA 623 

resides. Mr. Rose married, in 1H70, Annie A., born in Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of J(jhn and Margaret Nugent, descended from old 
Scotch families, who came to America about 1850. Children: Charles Jr., 
died in infancy; William, in business with his father, lives in North Brad- 
dock, married Dora P>owser ; Mildred, married Alfrefl A. Corey, and lives 
in Munhall; Ida Beatrice, married R. J. Mills, lives with Mr. Rose; Charles 
E., a dentist, living in North Braddock, married Mollie Linrlenberg. 



' The Gorham family traces its genealogy back to the De Gor- 

GORHAM rams of La Tanniere near Gorham in Maine, on the borders 
of Brittany, where William, son of Ralph de Gorham, built 
a castle in 1128. During the reign of William the Conqueror several of the 
name moved to England, where many of them became men of learning, 
wealth and influence. From England various members of the family mi- 
grated to Ireland, and ultimately to America, in which country the name has 
an ancient and honorable record in many directions. It is not always pos- 
sible to establish uninterrupted connection with earlier generations, but 
there is no reasonable doubt but that all bearing the name had a common 
origin. 

Michael Gorham was born in county Galway, Ireland, where he became 
a boat builder, and spent his entire life. He married Barbara Gorham, and 
they had children : Matthias, a boat builder, who lived and died in Ireland ; 
Valentine, a retired boat builder, now living in Ireland, county Galway; 
John Henry, of further mention ; Richard, was also a boat builder, and died 
in Ireland ; Patrick, who is employed in the steel works near Braddock, 
Pennsylvania, lives in Braddock Park. 

John Henry Gorham, son of Michael and Barbara (Gorham) Gorham, 
was born in county Galway, Ireland, in 1845, died in Braddock, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1902. He was educated in the public schools 
of Ireland, where he assisted his father in the boat building business until 
the age of twenty-two years. Deciding that the United States afiforded a 
better field for an ambitious, energetic young man to advance to prosperity, 
he then emigrated to this country, and located in Illinois, where he became 
a coal miner. He then followed various occupations until 1882, when he 
came to Braddock, Pennsylvania, and there opened a saloon, which he con- 
ducted successfully for a period of five years. Removing then to Braddock 
avenue, he built a hotel there at Nos. 18-20, and conducted this personally 
five years, when he sold out and was living retired from business at the 
time of his death. He was a Republican in political opinion, and he and his 
wife were members of St. Brendan's Church, later affiliating with St. 
Thomas'. He built a beautiful house at No. loi Mills avenue, in which 
Mrs. Gorham has now been living for the past nineteen years. Mr. Gorham 
married, August 26, 1883, Johanna Hillgrove, bom at Cresson, near Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania, and they had children: Michael, died in infancy; 
Barbara, lives with mother ; Patrick, died in infancy ; Mary, married James 
Keenan, has two children — Winifred and John — and lives in Braddock; 
John and Brendetta, died in infancy. 



624 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Luke Hillgrove, father of Mrs. Gorham, was born in county Cork, Ire- 
land, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1883. He came to America 
in 1847 in order to make a home here for his wife and family, and located 
in Cresson, where he lived some years, then removed to the Broad Top 
coal region, and finally to Pittsburgh, where his death occurred, and where 
he is buried in St. Mary's Cemetery. He was a coal digger by occupation. 
He married, in Ireland, Catherine Carroll, born in county Waterford, Ire- 
land, came to America in December, 1849. She died April 4, 1892, aged 
eighty- four years. They had children: Henry, a soldier during the Civil 
War, was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, returned to his home, 
and died soon thereafter as a result of his wound ; Bartholomew, lives re- 
tired at Homestead; Catherine, married James Brannigan, and died at 
Broad Top ; Thomas, a railway engineer, died in Pittsburgh ; John, an en- 
gineer, died in Pittsburgh ; Mary, died in childhood ; Johannah, married Mr. 
Gorham, as above stated ; an infant, died unnamed. 



The Bullions family .has been resident in this country but 
BULLIONS a comparatively few years, yet in this short space of time 

they have demonstrated that they possess in a marked de- 
gree the pronounced ability, forceful individuality and the perseverance of 
purpose which win success in business circles, and command universal re- 
spect. 

Leonard Bullions was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, where he was 
engaged in business as a baker during all the active years of his life, and 
died at an early age. He married Christina Murray, also a native of Dun- 
fermline, who married (second) William Drysdale, a cousin of Andrew 
Carnegie, and also died in Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Bullions had children : 
John, died at the age of sixteen years; Leonard, of further mention; two 
daughters, who died in infancy; Margaret, married James Gow, and died in 
Scotland; Jessie, lives unmarried in Dunfermline; a daughter, died in in- 
fancy. 

Leonard (2) Bullions, son of Leonard (i) and Christina (Murray) Bul- 
lions, was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, December i, 1855, died in Swiss- 
vale, Pennsylvania, November 5, 191 1. His early education was received in 
the public schools of his native town, and he then took a classical course in 
Edinburgh, and commenced the study of law. Having, however, received 
a very favorable offer from Andrew Carnegie to come to America, he 
abandoned the study of law and came to the United States when he was 
nineteen years of age. The limits of this review will not permit a detailed 
account of his activities, but they are, in brief, as follows : Settling at 
Pitt.sburgh, he was bookkeeper for the LTnion Mills at Twenty-eighth street ; 
employed in a similar capacity at Larimer Coke Works ; later at Latrobe, 
where he had charge of the coke works ; then in charge of the Scotia Iron 
Ore Mines ; in charge of the Carnegie Company's interests at Beaver Falls ; 
cashier and treasurer of the Carnegie interests in Pittsburgh ; superintendent 
of the nineteen-inch plate mill at the Homestead Steel Works; in charge of 



WESTERN J'ENNSYLVAXIA 625 

the Redstone Coal & Coke Company, at Jirownfield, for a period of five 
years; back to Pittsburgh as claim agent and metallurgical engineer for the 
last thirteen years of his life. All of these positions were in the interests 
of the Carnegie Company, and altogether they covered a period of thirty- 
six years. 1 le was consiflered the most ver.satile, accurate and experienced 
man in his field in his day. In 1900 he removed to Swissvale, where he had 
purchased an acre of land facing the railroad. He is buried in the ceme- 
tery at Momestead. llis political affiliations were with the Republican 
party, and he and his wife were members of the United I'resbyterian Ciiurch. 
Fraternally he was a Mason, having attained the Knight Templar degree. 

Mr. liullions married, July 31, 1875, Nancy Mclntyre, born in Larimer, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1856, a daughter of William 
and Anna (Long) Mclntyre, both born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
and married there. Mr. Mclntyre was a farmer, and later removed to West- 
moreland county, where he purchased a fine farm, and died there in 1875. 
He was a Democrat, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. His wife, 
who was also a member of the Presbyterian Church, died in 1885. They 
were the parents of fourteen children. Mr. and Mrs. Bullions had children: 
Leonard Palmerson, a machinist, living at Swissvale; George L., treasurer 
of the Philadelphia Street Railways Company, lives in Edgewood ; Andrew 
Carnegie, a foreman in the Bessemer Works, lives in Swissvale ; Christina, 
married Charles C. Lewis, and lives in Swissvale ; Nancy C, married 
Howard Graham, and lives in Pitcairn ; Jessie L., married Wilbert Milligan, 
and lives in Braddock ; Charles Schwab, a machinist, living with his mother; 
Jean Margaret ; Oscar Wallace ; Clara Mozelle ; and Hilda, who died in 
infancy. 



The name of Dell has been honored and has stood for definite 
DELI^ accomplishment in connection with the civic and business activi- 
ties of the State of Pennsylvania since the early days of the 
nineteenth century, when the family first made its appearance here. 

(I) Philip Dell, a native of Germany, came to the United States as a 
young lad. and settled near Philadelphia. He operated a stage coach route 
from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, which he inaugurated about 1820, and con- 
ducted many years. Finally he removed to Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, continuing the coach line, and at the same time engaged in stock 
breeding, and the buying and selling of stock. Finally he removed to Alle- 
gheny, where his death occurred in 1842. He was a member of the Lutheran 
Church. He married Mary , a native of France, who died some time be- 
fore her husband, and they had children : John, went to Australia, and re- 
mained there ; Joseph, a coal miner for many years, also boated on the canal, 
died aged about seventy-six years; Philip, went to Texas in 1851, and died 
there some years ago ; Jacob, of further mention ; Henry, a farmer, died in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1904; Rachel, died unmarried about 

1909. at the age of ninety years ; Eliza, married John Brown, and died in 

1910, at the age of eighty-six years; Mary, married William Bailes, and 



626 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

died in Cleveland, Ohio, after having spent the greater part of her life in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; Margaret, married David Conner, and died 
in Allegheny, at the age of seventy-five years; Catherine, married John 
Faust, and died in Allegheny at the age of seventy-five years. 

(II) Jacob Dell, son of Philip and Mary Dell, was born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and was killed by a train at Duquesne, in 
1904, having gone there to make his home with his son William F. Shortly 
after his marriage he settled at Bolivar, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
and was a boatman on the old Pennsylvania canal for a number of years. 
He then engaged in brickmaking at Bolivar, continuing in this occupation 
until he retired from active work. As stated above, he met his death in a 
most tragic manner. He was a soldier from the time of the first call for 
volunteers until June 25, 1864, being a member of Company I, Eleventh 
Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves, and was present at the battles of Bull 
Run, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Fredericksburg, Spottsylvania Court House, 
Cold Harbor, and numerous other engagements of scarcely less importance. 
He was captured, and detained four months in Libby and Andersonville 
prisons. He was slightly wounded three times, on one occasion being knocked 
down by the force with which a bullet hit his canteen. He was a member 
of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics, and he and his wife were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

He married Mary A. Harmon, born in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 183 1, died in Duquesne, in February, 1910. She was a daughter 
of Philip and Margaret (McClain) Harmon, the former born in Germany, 
the latter in Ireland. Both came to America in their youth, and settled in 
Westmoreland county. He came with his parents, who were among the 
pioneer settlers, and his father was killed by the Indians, and was buried 
under the tree where he had fallen. Philip Harmon was a cabinet maker by 
trade, but a farmer and land owner as well, and after his marriage lived for 
a time in Westmoreland county, later removing to Bolivar. He and his wife 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and were the parents of 
children: Jackson, a manufacturer of brick in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
died in 1910, at the age of seventy-three years; James, resides on Hazle- 
wood avenue, in Pittsburgh ; Rosa, married Dr. John Glover, and died in 
Missouri ; Mary A., who married Jacob Dell, as mentioned above ; Nancy, 
married Harry Blackburn, removed to Kansas in 1885, and died there in 
1908; Elizabeth, married Alexander Wynn, and died in Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Dell had children : Philip, an engineer in the em- 
ploy of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; William F., of further men- 
tion ; Maggie, widow of Thomas Edwards, lives in Duquesne ; Henry, a 
railroad conductor, lives in Duquesne; Rosa, died unmarried at the age of 
forty years ; Viola, married Samuel Wynn, and died in Lock Haven, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1889; Susan, died in young girlhood; Kate, married William 
Horton, lives in Clairton, Pennsylvania; John, an engineer, lives in Du- 
quesne. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 627 

(III) William F. Dell, son of Jacob and Mary A. ( Harmon; Dell, was 
born in Bolivar, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 21, 1853. He 
attended the public schools of his native county, and upon the completion 
of his education obtained employment in the brick works in Bolivar anrl in 
Clearfield county. In 1889 he came to Duquesne, and there entered the 
employ of the Carnegie Company, his first position being that of foreman, 
and then superintendent of the transportation department, discharging the 
duties of the latter position until 1906. He retired to private life for a 
period of three of four years, and was then elected justice of the peace in 
191 1, an ofiice he is still filling with great benefit to the community. In 191 1 
he also engaged in the real estate and insurance business, the former branch 
being connected entirely with local matters, and in the latter he represents 
five distinct companies. He has been a member of Clearfield Lodge, Xo. 
314, Free and Accepted Masons, since 1882; and is a member of McKees- 
port Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. 

Mr. Dell married, July i, 1875, Mary, born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 
a daughter of Robert and Mary Bain, an ancient family of Scotland, who 
came to America in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Dell have had children, all of whom 
were graduated from the high school : Robert, a borough engineer, lives in 
Duquesne ; Lillie, married Edw^ard Lytle, lives in Washington, Pennsylvania ; 
Russell, died at the age of twenty-one years; Willa, at home; Mabel, was 
graduated from the Duquesne High School in 1914. 



The Noble family is supposed to descend from Scotch ancestry, 
NOBLE and many of the name are now to be found scattered all over 

the Union. 
(I) William Noble was probably born in the eastern part of Pennsyl- 
vania, and came over the mountains in his earlier days, while yet unmar- 
ried. He settled at what later became Noblestown, and went to Pittsburgh 
soon after his marriage. There he was a teamster for a time, and about 
the early forties removed to Baldwin township, where he purchased three 
hundred acres of woodland, which is now the present site of Carrick bor- 
ough. He built a house where Buck Tavern now stands, and maintained a 
hotel there by that name for some years. About 1853 the tavern was 
destroyed by fire. He rebuilt it, however, and this building has been re- 
cently remodeled, and is still conducted under the same name. He rented 
the new tavern, and built a house for himself facing the land now known 
as Linwood avenue, and also built houses for his sons, and divided his prop- 
erty among them and his grandchildren. He and his wife were members 
of the Concord Presbyterian Church. He died in 1866. Mr. Noble married 
Margaret Gilliland, who died in 1870 or 1871, and they had children : John, 
of further mention ; Ann Eliza, married John Doolittle, died in the Pitts- 
burgh district; two who died in infancy; William G., lived and died on a 
part of the homestead, and is buried in Southside Cemetery. 

(II) John Noble, son of William and Margaret (Gilliland) Noble, was 
born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1822, died May 2J, 1884. He 



b28 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

grew to maturity on the homestead farm, and his father then gave him a 
farm of eighty-two acres, land which lay between Laughlin and Birming- 
ham avenues, and extended to Beck's Run. A fine house was also erected 
on this property for him, and he was engaged in the cultivation of this farm 
until his death. He was a Republican in politics, and once served as school 
director. He married (first) Jane Cowan, born in Baldwin township, in 
1828, died in 1865; married (second) Elizabeth West, who is now living in 
Muskogee, Oklahoma. Children by first marriage: Annie E., married 
John Bennett, and lives in Carrick ; Thomas A., an attorney, died in Carrick 
in 1907; Margaret, married Sterrett Work, and lives in Chicago; William 
Caldwell, of further mention; Calhoun Franklin, is an oil well driller and 
lives in Robinson township; John Burns, died in infancy; Oliver, died in 
infancy; a child unnamed, died at birth, and the mother died at the same 
time. Children by second marriage : James, died in Homestead in early 
manhood ; Matthew Lowrey, lives in Matamoras, Illinois ; John Knox, is a 
farmer in Ligonier Valley, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania ; West, was 
at one time chief of the police of Homestead, now resides in Muskogee, 
Oklahoma ; Arthur E., a carpenter, living in Homestead ; Joseph, a physician 
in Muskogee, Oklahoma, resides with his mother ; Elizabeth, unmarried, 
living with mother ; Jane, married Andrew Jackson Good, lives in Sulphur, 
Oklahoma; Sarah, lives with mother; Abbie, married John Dudgeon, also 
lives in Oklahoma. 

William Cowan, father of Mrs. Noble, was a son of David Cowan, and 
was an early resident of Baldwin township. His home was near Point 
View Hotel, where he owned one hundred and fifty acres. He was a black- 
smith and farmer. He died about 1883. For many years he was secretary 
of the Concord Presbyterian Church, to which he and his wife belonged. 
He was a strong supporter of the Republican party, and served as treasurer 
of Baldwin township. He married Margaret Calhoun, whose death occurred 
many years before his own, and they had children : Margaret, married 
(first) William Wilson, (second) William Moore, and died in Baldwin town- 
ship ; Jane, who married Mr. Noble, as above stated ; Noble Calhoun, a toll 
keeper in Baldwin township, where he died; David, a farmer, died on the 
homestead in Baldwin township; Sarah Elizabeth, never married, is now 
living on the homestead, and is more than seventy years of age; William T., 
lives on a part of the homestead. 

(Ill) William Caldwell Noble, son of John and Jane (Cowan) Noble, 
was born in Baldwin township, now Carrick borough, December 5, 1855. 
His education, which was a liberal one, was acquired in the public schools, 
the old Jefiferson Academy, at Canonsburg, and Newell's Institute, a busi- 
ness college. He continued living on the farm until 1890, having, in asso- 
ciation with his brother, purchased the interests of the other heirs. About 
this time the Birmingham Land Company bought about twenty-five acres 
of this property to turn into building lots, and a large part of Carrick has 
grown up on this. Some time later Mr. Noble sold wdiat remained of his 
share to his brother, and retired from active business interests. He built 




^.^ c^ (kA-c^ 



VVKSTHRN i^ENNSYLVANlA 629 

a house on what is now VVoodlawn avenue, on a small jjlot left by his grand- 
father, and has lived there since that time. He has been a staunch Re- 
publican always, and has served as assessor of Carrick borough. He and 
his wife are members of the Concord Presbyterian Church. Mr. Noble 
married, in 1882, Maggie J., born in Altoona, Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
Anthony Simonton. Children : William Anthony, a lumber dealer, lives in 
Memphis, Tennessee; Margaret Jane, died just after her graduation from 
the Indiana State Normal School ; Clara, married Ira Greaves, and lives 
in Carrick; Harry Ralph, died in 1913, was married and left one child; 
Thomas H., twin of Edward P., lives with parents; Edward P., twin of 
Thomas H., is a clerk for Jones & Laughlin ; Anna Marie, married George 
Howe, and lives on Taft avenue, Pittsburgh. 



Educated for the priesthood of the Roman Catholic Church, 
McHUGH Rev. Henry McHugh, a twentieth-century representative of 

the ancient McHugh family of Ireland, has ever since hi- 
ordination in 1868 faithfully and efficiently served the church of his choice 
in Western Pennsylvania. Monuments to his untiring energy, faith and 
devotion are to be found in every parish he has served in the form of church 
edifices, schools and school buildings, convents and chapels, as well as in 
the spiritual growth of the people he has served. Seventy-eight years have 
passed over his devoted head and the term "father" is no less one of respect 
for his holy calling, than one of afifection given him alike by Catholic and 
Protestant. Cultured, pious and enthusiastic, he has served his communi- 
ties well, not alone as a minister of the gospel and spiritual leader, but as 
citizen, friend and neighbor, he has shown the broadness of his nature and 
the depth of his love for his fellowmen. "Father" McHugh is a great- 
grandson of Patrick McHugh, who married a Miss McManus and with her 
lived and died in county Fermanagh, Ireland. 

(II) Matthew McHugh, son of Patrick McHugh, was born in county 
Fermanagh, Ireland, there married and lived for several years thereafter. 
He then came to the United States, settling in Center county, Pennsylvania. 
He was superintendent of a foundry later owned by Andrew G. Curtin, 
father of the war governor of Pennsylvania, and engaged in business for 
himself as a manufacturer and dealer in charcoal. His sons were : Michael, 
of further mention ; James, a soldier in the English army and fought under 
Wellington at Waterloo ; also had three daughters who came with him to the 
United States. 

(III) Michael McHugh, son of Matthew McHugh, was born in county 
Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1790, died in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, in 1865. 
He grew to manhood in Ireland, not coming to the United States with his 
father, but came later, bringing with him a wife and one child. He located 
in Center county, Pennsylvania, for a few years, where he engaged in char- 
coal making; later located in Cambria county, where he engaged in farm- 
ing and where some of his children were born, and baptized b}- the Rev. 



630 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Demetris Gallitzen, in St. Mary's Church, where they were all reared in the 
practice of their religious duties. He was a communicant of the Roman 
Catholic Church, as were his wife and all members of his family. He 
married, in Ireland, Elizabeth McManus, who was also born in Fermanagh 
county, Ireland, lived to a good old age and died with her son, Rev. H. 
McHugh, at Wilmore, Pennsylvania, in i88g. Her brother, Patrick Mc- 
Manus, also came to the United States and lived near Philadelphia. Chil- 
dren of Michael McHugh: i. Patrick, born in Ireland, now deceased. 
2. Mary Ann, born on the Atlantic Ocean, married John Francis, soldier 
of the Mexican War. 3. Mathew. 4. Rose, born in Pennsylvania, where 
she yet lives. 5. James, died in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 6. Eliza, married 
John Sander, and lives in Cassandra, Pennsylvania. 7. John, died in 1873. 
8. Henry, of further mention. 9. Catherine, died young. 10. Michael, 
deceased. 

(IV) Rev. Henry McHugh, now the veteran pastor of St. Canice 
Roman Catholic Church at Knoxville, Pennsylvania, was born in Cambria 
county, Pennsylvania, December 8, 1835, eighth child and fifth son of 
Michael and Elizabeth (McManus) McHugh; baptized by Rev. Gallitzen. 
His early education was obtained in. the country public schools; then 
he entered St. Francis' College at Loretto, 1857. Later he entered St. 
Michael's Seminary at Glenwood, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in February, 
1859. He was ordained, June 6, 1868, by Bishop Dominic, of Pittsburgh. 
His first charge was at Loretto, Pennsylvania, where he served from July 
12, 1868, to February, 1869. He was assigned to his first charge as regular 
pastor at Myersdale, in the southern part of Somerset county, an important 
town on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, where he officiated along the line 
of the Baltimore & Ohio and from Sand Patch to Ohio Pyle Falls, adminis- 
tering to the spiritual needs of the railroad employees then constructing the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He was then sent to the church at Brov^msville, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, a large parish including missions at Waynes- 
burgh and Uniontown, Pennsylvania, where he caused a church' to be 
erected at Waynesburg during the three years he was pastor of that parish. 
In 1873 he was assigned to the church at Wilmore, Cambria county, Penn- 
sylvania, and for twenty-three years labored in that parish. During that 
year the church grew wonderfully in numbers and spirituality, the church 
property was modernized and enlarged, and at Ernfelt a church and parish 
house was erected. In March, 1896, Father McHugh was appointed to the 
parish of St. Agnes, Fifth avenue, Pittsburgh, and there he completed in 
1913 a successful pastorate of seventeen years. Under his guidance, St. 
Agnes became a large and flourishing parish of seven hundred families. 
His first care was to clear ofif a debt of $21,000; this being done he built a 
fine, spacious parish house. Later he secured a desirable location on which 
he built a large up-to-date school, with a basement which now serves as a 
chapel for the accommodation of the parish, since the destruction of old 
St. Agnes by fire. On December 11, 1913, he became pastor of the church 




fu^^ ^^, ^c^^U^yJ^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 631 

of St. Canice at Knoxvillc, where he is now located. One of the results 
of his work in Knoxville has been the erection of the beautiful convent of 
St. Canice, one of the finest and most modernly arranged convents in 
Western Pennsylvania. 



From New England to New York and thence to Penn- 
MATHEWSON sylvania, in which state the family is represented by 
Dr. Franklin Wayne Mathewson, a member of the 
medical fraternity of Allegheny county. 

(I) The first of this line of whom authentic record is obtainable is 
David Mathewson, born May 11, 1760. He and his wife, Betty, were the 
parents of: i. Elijah, of whom further. 2. Thomas, born March 7, 1784, 
died August 18, 1834. 3. Joanna, born November 28, 1785, died April 
26, 1865. 4. Sarah, born April 13, 1788, died May 28, 1864. 5. Lucena, born 
April 7, 1790, died October 7, 1822. 6. Mary, born August 25, 1792, died 
March 21, 1813. 7. David, born November 30, 1794, died December 31, 
1822. 8. Laban, born May 27, 1797, died January 3, 1886. 9. Betty, born 
June 27, 1799, died August 10, 1841. 10. Rhoda, born July 11, 1801, died 
March 22, 1813. 

(II) Elijah Mathewson, son of David and Betty Mathewson, was born 
November 6, 1782, died March 14, 1833. He was at one time a resident of 
Otsego county. New York, his home probably being near Hartwick. He 
miarried, among his sons being Albert, of whom further. 

(III) Albert Mathewson, son of Elijah Mathewson, was born in Otsego 
county, New York, and there died, aged thirty-two years. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and, desirous of moving to Pennsylvania, made a trip on 
foot to Erie county, where he purchased a tract of land in Franklin town- 
ship, returning to his New York home in the same manner that he had 
come. This expedition so weakened him that he contracted typhoid fever, 
from which he died at an early age, in 1846. His widow did not marry 
a second time, but reared her family in Hartwick, New York, in 1865, when 
her youngest son, Albert (2), was a youth of nineteen years, moving to the 
farm in Franklin township, Erie county, Pennsylvania, that her husband 
had bought more than twenty years before and to which she still held 
title. The farm is now occupied by Ceylon, the elder of the two sons of 
Albert and Mary (Robinson) Mathewson, who married Clara Howard. 
Mary Robinson, wife of Albert Mathewson, was born in Otsego county, 
New York, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, dying 
aged sixty-seven years. 

(IV) Albert (2) Mathewson, son of Albert (i) and Mary (Robinson) 
Mathewson, was born in Hartwick, Otsego county. New York, May 9, 1846, 
died in Franklin township, Erie county, Pennsylvania, in 1907. In his 
native place he attended the public schools and later became a student in 
the Hartwick Seminary, where his education was completed. At the age 
of nineteen years, his mqther, his elder brother, and he moved to a farm 



632 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

in Erie county, Pennsylvania, which the two brothers cleared, later jointly 
undertaking its cultivation. To this tract they added more land as the op- 
portunity presented, and for many years conducted farming operations in 
partnership, at length dividing the property, Albert Mathewson's share being 
one hundred and twenty acres, on which he conducted general farming until 
his death. He was a successful agriculturist, and found time for much 
public service, as a Republican holding, among others, the offices of town- 
ship assessor, township auditor and school director. He married Alice 
Mills, born near Edinboro, Erie county, Pennsylvania, September 9, 1846, 
her parents members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, her father the 
owner of a one hundred and fifty acre farm in Franklin township, Erie 
county, Pennsylvania. Albert and Alice ( Mills) Mathewson were the parents 
of: I. A child who died in infancy. 2. Franklin Wayne, of whom further. 
3. Ida, married (first) Ernest Porter, deceased, (second) James H. Phillips, 
and lives on a farm in Erie county, Pennsylvania. 4. Jeannette, unmarried, 
a school teacher. 5. Cora, met an accidental death at the age of twenty- four 
years through being thrown from a carriage, the horse she was driving hav- 
ing run away. 6. Clinton, principal of the North Strabane township high 
school, W^ashington county, Pennsylvania ; married Grace Donaldson, of 
Cononsburg, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1914. 

(V) Dr. Franklin W^ayne Mathewson, son of Albert (2) and Alice 
(Mills) Mathewson, was born near Edinboro, Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
January i, 1875. After attending the district schools in the neighborhood 
of his homfe he pursued a course in the Edinboro State Normal School. 
The following four years he was a school teacher in his native township, 
and for the following year and a half was employed in the drug store owned 
by Dr. S. B. Hotchkiss, at the same time studying under the preceptorship 
of that gentleman. In 1899 he entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Western Pennsylvania and was graduated therefrom M.D. in the 
class of 1903. It was then the custom in that institution to award to ten 
members of the graduating class, chosen for the general excellence of their 
work, the privilege of one year's work in the City Dispensary and Maternity 
Hospital, Dr. Mathewson being one of the number selected from his class 
for this work. This completed, for four months he was associated with the 
Pittsburgh Board of Health, in November, 1903, locating in the practice of 
his profession at Oakdale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Since that time 
he has been an active practitioner in that place, is now a member of the 
Oakdale Board of Health, and holds a prominent place in the medical pro- 
fession of the county. His political tendencies are Republican, although at 
the polls he confines himself to no one party ticket. He serves the Pres- 
byterian Church in the capacity of elder, his wife also being a member of 
that organization, and he belongs to Oakdale Lodge, No. 669, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. 

Dr. Mathewson married. September 27, 1905, Margaret Wilt, born near 
Oil City, Pennsylvania, daughter of Simon and Mary Wilt, both of her 



westi<:r\ i'exxsylvaxia 033 

parents living to the present time, her father an oil ganger. Children of 
Dr. Franklin Wayne and Margaret (Wiltj Mathewson : i. Simon Wilt, 
born December 2"], 1906, died October 26, 1908. 2. Alice, born March 12, 
1910. 3. Franklin Wayne, Jr., born h'ebruary 17, 1912. 4. John Wilt, ijoni 
April 2, 1914. 



The history of the Coursin family in Pennsylvania begins 
COURSIN with Peter Coursin, who came to Allegheny county from his 

native state, New Jersey, prior to the year 1800, and there 
lived to the wonderful age of one hundred and one years. He had sons and 
daughters: Mrs. Belum Grimes, of West Elizabeth, Pennsylvania; Mrs. 
Catherine Hamilton, whose age near equalled that of her honored father, 
she reaching the age of ninety-nine years, two months, twelve days ; Nancy, 
married Leo Cunningham; Isaac, who was drowned when a young man; 
Benjamin. 

(II) Benjamin Coursin, son of Peter Coursin, became a boat builder, 
becoming foreman of the yard of Samuel Walker at Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. 
When steam vessels made their appearance on the river, he formed a part- 
nership with James Irwin and Richard Stephens, as contractors and builders 
of such vessels. They conducted a very successful business until 1849, when 
the firm dissolved. Mr. Coursin then moved to McKeesport, locating on the 
Reynoldton side of the Youghiogheny in what is now the tenth ward of 
McKeesport. There he erected a saw mill and started a shipyard on his own 
account. He prospered abundantly and became interested in steamboat lines 
of the Youghiogheny, Monongahela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers. After the 
war he sold his mill and shipyard to Hammitt, Milliken and Chrissinger, and 
devoted his time to the management of steamboat lines, in which he was in- 
terested. He was a director of the Northern Line Packet Company, which 
ran twelve large steamboats from St. Louis to St. Paul ; director of the 
Pittsburgh, Brownsville and Geneva Packet Company ; president of the Eliza- 
beth and Pittsburgh Packet Company, also owning shares in several large 
steamboats plying the Ohio and ^Mississippi as far south as New Orleans. 
He was an ardent Republican and gave free passage on his steamers for the 
voters of Elizabeth township, which then included a very large territory, 
causing many of the voters to travel long distances to reach the polling place, 
Elizabeth. He died at his home in Reynoldton in his eighty-eighth year. 
He married Christina, daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Rhoads, of an 
old Peters Creek family. Children : Isaac, a boat builder and lumberman, 
later internal revenue collector ; Benjamin Biddle, of whom further ; Fred- 
erick H., a prominent real estate dealer of McKeesport ; John McD.. a 
veteran of Company I, Pennsylvania Reserves, died in 1864; David, died in 
infancy; James P., deceased, was proprietor of the Hotel Ringgold in Mc- 
Keesport ; Mary E., married B. D. Downey, now living in New Philadelphia. 
Ohio. 

(III) Benjamin Biddle Coursin. second son of Benjamin and Christina 



634 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(Rhoads) Coursin, was born in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 22, 1837. After preparatory courses in public schools, he 
completed his studies at VVaynesburg College. He became a printer and 
eventually editor and proprietor of the McKeesport Times, which he owned 
and published in association with Bartley Campbell, later a well known play- 
wright. In connection with the Times he ran a large job printing office, and 
held the contract for the county printing which amounted to about $12,000 
annually. Until 1865 he was also engaged in the coal business, operating the 
Aliquippa mines in Mifflin township, Allegheny county. In 1895 he sold out 
his interests to Bailey Whigham & Company for $102,000, then until 1889 
was heavily engaged in real estate operations, and for years was McKees- 
port's largest property owner and tax payer. In 1889 failing health caused 
him to seek the aid of the baths at Mount Clemens, Michigan. He was so 
pleased with the improvement in his health and with the town itself, that he 
decided to make it his home. He purchased land there and erected the 
Clementine Bath House and the Eastman Hotel, owning both until stricken 
with paralysis, when he sold the bath house but retained the hotel and 
other interests he had there acquired. 

Among his McKeesport activities was the organization of the McKees- 
port & Youghiogheny Ice Company, and the erection of its large plant, hold- 
ing a majority of the stock of that company. He was sole owner of the 
Crystal Ice Company, also of McKeesport, and so continued until his death. 
At Mount Clemens, in addition to his buildings mentioned, he organized and 
was president until his death of the Lakeside Street Railway Company, and 
built the road from Mount Clemens to Detroit. He also secured a charter 
for the Pittsburgh, Virginia & Charleston Railroad, now a branch of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad system. A Republican in politics, he was actively 
interested in politics, served as burgess and councilman several terms, and 
was influential in party councils. He belonged to the Masonic order, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Honor, Heptasophs, and other organizations, social, 
fraternal and political. He loved horses, and his greatest sport was in see- 
ing well-matched running horses. He was fond of baseball and out-door 
sports, thoroughly enjoying contests of skill and strength, even in his latter 
years. He died May 23, 1913, deeply regretted. 

Benjamin Biddle Coursin married, June 2, 1858, Sarah P. Haney, who 
died June 19, 1910, daughter of John and Sarah (Lewis) Haney. Children: 
Mary V., resides in McKeesport, unmarried ; Benjamin Lawrence, of further 
mention; Edwin S., a clerk, residing in Milwaukee; Charles E., an oil well 
driller of Warren, Ohio; Blanche M., married Robert J. Black, ex-mayor 
of McKeesport ; Clyde C, a physician of St. Louis, Missouri ; Nellie J., who 
met a tragic death by drowning at the age of twenty-six years. 

(IV) Benjamin Lawrence Coursin, eldest son of Benjamin Biddle and 
Sarah P. (Haney) Coursin, was born in Elizabeth township, Pennsylvania, 
September 23, i860. He was educated at Mansfield Academy and Iron City 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 635 

Business College, received his diploma from the latter institution in 1879. 
He was connected with the United States internal revenue service until 1888, 
serving in 1880 and 1882 as tobacco inspector of the twenty-second Penn- 
sylvania district under William Windham. In 1884 he became manager of 
the Crystal Ice Company in McKeesport, a company founded and owned by 
his father, continuing until 1896, when he was elected alderman from the 
third ward of McKeesport, an office he yet holds through successive elections, 
being the second oldest alderman in the city. He also conducts a real estate 
business, dealing principally in local properties. In political faith he is a 
Republican and is an active influential member of his party. 

Benjamin L. Coursin married, in 1884, Martha A., daughter of Cap- 
tain Eli and Catherine Cook, of McKeesport. Children : Allen E., died 
aged eleven years; Benjamin Biddle (2), died in infancy; Sarah Haney, 
a graduate of Pittsburgh Academy, lives at home. 



The first that is known of the name of Foster is about the year 
FOSTER 1065, when Sir Richard Forrester went from Normandy over 
to England accompanied by his brother-in-law, William the 
Conqueror, and participated in the battle of Hastings. The name was later 
changed to Forester, then Foster. It signifies one who had care of wild 
lands ; one who loved the forest, a characteristic trait which has marked the 
bearers of the name through centuries. The Fosters appear to have located 
in the northern counties of England, and in the early centuries of English 
history, participated in many an encounter with their Scottish foes. The 
name is mentioned in "Marmion" and the "Lay of the Last Minstrel." In 
later years some members of the family migrated to Ireland, and founded 
families there. 

(I) Alexander Foster Sr. was born in county Londonderry, Ireland, 
June 3, 1773, died in Pennsylvania, March 14, 1849. He emigrated to the 
United States in early manhood, arriving at Philadelphia, July 12, 1793, and 
for a time lived in Chester and Lancaster counties, Pennsylvania, later drift- 
ing to Pittsburgh. With some others he took a flatboat loaded with provi- 
sions down the Ohio river to General Wayne's headquarters, and upon the 
return trip they were attacked by Indians near Marietta, but escaped. They 
made their way to Erie, where they helped erect a blockhouse, and soon after- 
wards he returned to Pittsburgh, where he settled on the Bower Hill farm, 
and Chartiers creek, and lived there thirteen years. Removing to Somerset 
township, Washington county, he lived there twenty-one years, then moved 
to a farm in Versailles township, Allegheny county, where the remainder 
of his life was spent. He and his wife were members of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, and both are buried in Versailles Cemetery, at McKees- 
port. He married, in 1800, Sarah Davis, born in Ireland in 1777, died in 
Indianapolis, Indiana, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Margaret Forsythe, 
December 25, 1858. She had come to this country in the same ship as Mr. 
Foster, in company with her parents, Samuel and Martha (Morrison) Davis, 
and her brothers, Walter, William and John. 



636 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(II) Samuel D. Foster, son of Alexander and Sarah (Davis) Foster, 
was born on the Bower Hill farm, December 19, 1802, died on a farm near 
McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 14. 1886. Until he 
was eleven years old he lived on the old home farm, then until the age of 
twenty-three years in Washington county. Removing to Pittsburgh, he was 
in the government employ around the garrison, and after his marriage settled 
at Smith's Mills, Washington county, on a farm. Later he was engaged in 
the mercantile business for a time at Beallsville, and in 1834 purchased the 
farm on which he died. On this farm were about twenty acres of coal land, 
which he worked, and sold in McKeesport. He was a strict temperance 
man. and a ruling elder of the Associate Reformed Church at Turtle Creek, 
later at McKeesport. He married, March 12, 1829, on the present site of the 
Union Station of the Pennsylvania Railroad in Pittsburgh, Martha McCul- 
lough, born January 7, 1806, died June 5, 1864. They had children : Sarah, 
born July 19, 1830, married Samuel Stewart, and lives in Versailles town- 
ship; John McCullough, born January 5, 1832, was a lumberman, and died 
in Kansas City. Missouri; Alexander Davis, of further mention; William, 
born March 12, 1836, died in 1840; Walter, born November 10, 1838, is a 
farmer in Versailles township. 

(III) Alexander Davis Foster, son of Samuel D. and Martha (McCul- 
lough) Foster, was born at Beallsville, Pennsylvania, November 23, 1833, 
died in McKeesport. January 14, 1909. He was a glassblower by trade, fol- 
lowing this calling many years in Pittsburgh in the McCullough factory in 
which he held the rank of foreman a long time. Upon the outbreak of the 
Civil War lie enlisted in Company I, Sixty-third Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, for three years or during the war, and participated in 
the following engagements : Yorktown, Williamsport, Fair Oaks, Frazier"s 
Farm, Malvern Hill, second battle of Bull Run, Chantilly, Fredericksbuig, 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, North 
Ann River, Petersburg. Mr. Foster was wounded at Petersburg, June 18, 
1864. his head being struck by a minie ball, and he was carried oft" the field 
and transported to Washington, and discharged. September 9, 1864. After 
the war he went west and entered the employ of Thomas Frazier, of Ohio, 
being engaged in freighting with ox teams between the Missouri river and 
Denver, Colorado. Upon his last trip he sold the oxen, and then spent some 
time mining in the gold region of Montana. Upon his return to the east 
he married, followed his trade of glass blowing for a time, and then engaged 
in the mercantile business until his death. He married, July 13, 1871, 
Amanda L., born in Pittsburgh, April 22, 1849, a daughter of David and 
Rhoda ( lennings) y\ul<l. They had children: Martha Matilda, born No- 
vember 30, 1872, married K. P. Junker, and resides in McKeesport; David 
Auld, of further mention; Samuel Davis, born September 11. 1880, a state 
highway engineer, and member of Governor Tener's staff; Edwin Alex- 
ander, born Uilv 16, 1882, an employee of the state highway department, 
married Stella Hamptons and lives on Lincoln Road, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 



WESTERN I'ENNSYEVANIA 637 

(IV) David Auld Foster, son of Alexander Davis and y\manda L. 
(Auld) Foster, was born in Versailles township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 22, 1874. He was educated in the public schools and at 
Iron City Business College, from which he was graduated about 189/ . 
Having accepted a position with the R. E. Stone Furniture Company, in 
McKeesport, he remained with this concern eleven years, then, in 190Z, 
formed a partnership with Victor A. Auld under the firm name of Foster 
& Auld, and has since that time been located at Nos. 523-525 Walnut 
street. They carry a stock valued at $40,000, consisting of furniture, and 
house furnishings of every description. Mr. Foster is a director of the 
Versailles and McKeesport Cemetery Association, being the fourth of his 
family, and the third in generational number to fill this offtce. The first to 
hold it was his grandfather, Samuel D. Foster, who was a member of the 
first board of directors ; at his death his son-in-law, David Auld, was elected 
to succeed him ; the next to fill the oflfice was his son, Alexander D. Foster, 
who was succeeded by his son, David Auld Foster. He is Republican in 
politics, and he and his wife are members of the First Baptist Church. His 
fraternal associations are as follows : McKeesport Lodge, No. 582, Free 
and Accepted Masons ; Benevolent and Protectice Order of Elks ; Knights 
of Malta ; Workmen of the World ; Youghiogheny Country Club and the 
McKeesport Cyclers. 

Mr. Foster married, June 16, 1904, Elva Woodall, born in McKees- 
port, a daughter of Captain Oliver C. and Alice (Holt) Coon. They have 
no children. 



About the time of the "whiskey insurrection" in Western 
VAN KIRK Pennsylvania, the ferry across the Monongahela, above 

Elizabeth, near present Lock No. 3, a crossing known as 
MacFarlane's Ferry, was operated by Major John Walker, and there he 
ferried many of the soldiers across, who were bound for the seat of war. 
This Major John W^alker was the maternal grandfather of Samuel Walker 
Van Kirk, of Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, formerly of the mercantile firm of 
Van Kirk & Walker. The W^alkers came to Western Pennsylvania from 
the state of Delaware, the \'an Kirks from New Jersey. 

(I) The early \'an Kirk settler was Joseph Van Kirk, who at an early 
date made his way on horseback from New Jersey to Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a young man of education and for a time taught a 
school located about seven miles from Elizabeth. Surveying was also one 
of his accomplishments and many of the present township and county lines 
were run by him as well as many farm boundaries of the district. He owned 
a farm of about two hundred acres, largely cleared and brought under 
cultivation by himself and sons. On this he built a long one-story house of 
logs, which later he covered with weather boards. This fami, adjoining 
Round Hill Church grounds, was a favorite stopping place for travellers 
who were most hospitably entertained by their educated and genial host. 



638 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

He was scribe for the surrounding neighborhood, writing the deeds, con- 
tracts and legal papers for the farmers as well as doing their surveying. 
He died about 1845, death resulting from a stroke of apoplexy. He married 
a Miss Williams, who long survived him. Children: i. William K., of 
further mention. 2. Gertrude, married Isaac Wycofif, a farmer near Eliza- 
beth, where both died. 3. Joseph, a farmer, lived to be ninety years of age, 
dying in Elizabeth. 4. Asher, lived to be over eighty years of age, dying 
in McKeesport, but spending his active life as a farmer. 5. John, moved to 
Ohio, where he died. 6. Samuel, lived to the age of ninety-two years, dying 
on his farm near Elizabeth. 

(II) William K. Van Kirk, eldest son of Joseph Van Kirk, was born 
in West Newton, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1799, died in Elizabeth, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 11, 1881. He obtained a good education under his 
father's teachings and in the neighborhood schools, and until his marriage 
was his father's assistant on the farm and on his surveying trips. After 
his marriage he located at Millsboro, Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
where he worked in the shipyards, aiding in the construction of the flat- 
boats used in the early days. He also built or helped to build some of the 
small river steamboats. In 1839 he moved to Elizabeth, where he bought a 
house built in 1810 by a Mr. McConnell from New Jersey, the house ad- 
joining the hotel kept by his father-in-law, John Walker. This site on 
Water street, Elizabeth, is now occupied by his son, Samuel Walker Van 
Kirk. In Elizabeth, William K. Van Kirk engaged in mercantile business 
at the corner of Market and Second streets, then after many years of suc- 
cessful trading, he retired and passed his after life relieved of business 
cares. He was a member of the Masonic Order, a Republican in politics, 
and both he and his wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church, and both are buried in the old Walker burial plot. 

William K. Van Kirk married Matilda Walker, born in Elizabeth town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1805, died August 21, 
1874, daughter of Major John and Diana (Craighead) Walker. John 
Walker was born in Wilmington, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, coming 
when young to Western Pennsylvania. For a time he operated MacFar- 
lane's Ferry across the Monongahela river, later settling in Elizabeth. In 
1819 he built a brick hotel on the site overlooking the river, that is still 
standing, and there for many years conducted a well patronized and popular 
house of entertainment for travellers. He was also engaged with his 
brother-in-law, John Craighead, in the lumber business. He died June 4, 
1856, aged eighty-six years, three months, twenty-six days. He married 
Diana Craighead, who died October 7, 1853, aged seventy-three years, five 
months and four days. Seven children: i. Samuel, a steamboat builder, 
died in Elizabeth. 2. Mary, married Solomon Speer, and died in Peoria, 
Illinois. 3. Matilda, married William K. Van Kirk, of previous mention. 
4. Sarah, married Dir. William Penniman, and died in Elizabeth. 5. Diana, 
married Samuel Frew, and died in Western Pennsylvania. 6. John, a mer- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 639 

chant, died in Colorado, aged ninety-three years. 7. Robert C, a major 
in the Union army during the Civil War, died in Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Children of William K. and Matilda (Walker) Van Kirk: i. Angeline, 
married her cousin, John S. Walker, died at their residence, Walker's 
Heights, Elizabeth. 2. Samuel Walker, of further mention. 3. 4. and 5. 
died in infancy. 

(Ill) Samuel Walker Van Kirk, only son of William K. and Matilda 
(Walker) Van Kirk, was born in Millsboro, Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 22, 1832, and now at the age of eighty-two is living retired, 
after an active business career, in the house built in 1810, purchased by his 
father in 1839, adjoining the old brick hotel erected by his grandfather, 
Major John Walker. He remodeled and enlarged the old house in 1875, and 
there, venerable in years, honored by his townsmen and highly respected 
wherever known, he resides, living anew the scenes of his youth, memory 
being aided by the scenes and surroundings to which he came as a boy of 
seven years. 

He attended in youth the public schools and Sewickley Academy, then 
presided over by Dr. Trevella. He then entered Waynesburg College, con- 
tinuing until twenty years of age, then entered his uncle's employ in 1852 
as clerk in the latter's store in Elizabeth. A few years later he formed a 
partnership with his cousin, Samuel Walker, and established a general store 
in Elizabeth and as Van Kirk & Walker they conducted a very profitable 
business for thirty-five years. In 1899 this long and mutually agreeable 
and prosperous partnership was dissolved and Mr. Van Kirk retired to a 
well-earned relief from business cares. At the time of his retirement he 
was one of the oldest merchants of his town and one who had aided in 
every movement for the improvement or advancement of his town. 

Mr. Van Kirk married, December 15, 1864, Florence Power, born in 
Elizabeth township, daughter of John and Mary (Howell) Power, of an old 
and respected Allegheny county family. The venerable couple will on De- 
cember 15, of the present year, 1914, celebrate the golden anniversary of 
their marriage. Children: i. Edward, now connected with the air brake 
department of the Westinghouse Electrical and Manufacturing Company; 
he married Catherine Smalley, and resides with his father ; children : Wil- 
liam K. (2), Helen Catherine. 2. Alice, married George T. Richards, 
formerly of the firm of Drake, Stratton & Company, now residing in Phila- 
delphia; children: Florence, George, John Van Kirk, Balleck R.. Gwynne, 
W^ayne. 3. William, accidentally killed at the World's Fair in Chicago in 
1893. 



Incidents from the life of the great-grandfather of Joseph A. 

LUTZ Lutz, of this chronicle, are most interesting, the recital taking 

one to the homeland of the family, Germany. This ancestor of 

Mr. Lutz was growing from boyhood at the time when Napoleon I., of 

France, had begun his remarkable campaign of conquest, the like of which 



640 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

is not recorded in history. At one time the French army, with the Em- 
peror at its head, was encamped within a day's journey of the Lutz home, 
where lived the ancestor who is tlie hero of this story, a lad of seventeen, 
large and strong for his age, familiar with every foot of the surrounding 
country within a radius miles in extent. While the army was there en- 
camped the lad was required by a priest of his faith, the Roman Catholic, 
to conduct him secretly through the lines of the French army, which the 
boy was easily able to do. When the two parted the priest, in thanks, 
gave the boy his blessing, assuring him that he would say one mass for him 
each day until his youthful guide had returned home in safety, and also as 
long as he, the priest, lived. While retracing his steps, Mr. Lutz's ancestor 
was detected by the French soldiers, and was impressed into the French 
service. No opportunity for escape presenting itself, he was compelled to 
serve in the army of the Emperor for seventeen years, during which time 
he participated in many campaigns and numerous battles, safely surviving 
each succeeding war although frequently wounded by the bullets of the 
enemy. The power of Napoleon broken, his magnificent army, or its 
remnant, disbanded, the unwilling conscript made his way home to a family 
who had long despaired him as dead. , He married and had children, one 
of his sons Joseph, of whom further. 

(II) Joseph Lutz was born near Berlin, Germany, and when twelve 
years of age left home without his parents' permission or knowledge and 
went to sea. For seven years he was a sailor before the mast, at the end 
of that time settling in the United States, making his home in Chartiers 
Valley, near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He became a gardener, his first 
land near McKees Rocks, his industry and frugal habits enabling him to 
save a large share of the generous profits he reaped. After his marriage he 
moved to a farm he had bought in Scott township, Allegheny county, like- 
wise holding title to considerable other property in the county, and was uni- 
versally known as a successful and prosperous gardener. Both he and his 
wife, Margaret (Hartz) Lutz, a native of Germany, were members of 
the Roman Catholic Church. Children of Joseph and Margaret (Hartz) 
Lutz: I. Mary, deceased, was thrice married, her second husband Henry 
Rockenhauser, her third John Shoen ; at the time of her death she lived in 
Bethel township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 2. John, a farmer of 
Bethel township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, died in 1899, the victim 
of a paralytic stroke. 3. Frances, married Charles Meisey, a farmer and 
oil operator, lives near Noblestown, Pennsylvania. 4. Margaret, married 
August Haller, died in 1903, for many years proprietor of the Pittsburgh 
Salt Works, who died after his retirement from business. 5. Josephine, 
married F"erdinand Dove, a farmer of Baldwin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and has a large family. 6. Joseph A., of whom further. 7. 
Martha, married William Lindemeyer, and lives with him on a farm in- 
herited from her father. 8. Matilda, married John Stolze, deceased ; was 
a farmer ; lives near Library, Pennsylvania. 9. Daniel, died aged about 
sixteen years. 





^rry 





WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 641 

(III) Joseph A. Lutz, son of Joseph and Margaret CHartzj l.utz, was 
born on Pittsburgh South Side, Allegheny county, I'ennsylvania, May 10, 
1841. He grew to maturity on his father's farm in Scott township, and on 
the death of the elder Lutz inherited a portion thereof, residing on that 
place until 1874, when he purchased land in Mifflin township, in the same 
county, there living retired at the present time. His life-long occupation 
has been gardening and fruit growing, and in these callings he has been 
uniformly successful, his skillful and careful cultivation of his land bring- 
ing him material prosperity. He and his wife were members of the Roman 
Catholic Church, of which faith he is still a communicant. He married 
Sarah Riley, born in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1840, died in Mifflin township, that county, in June, 1906, daughter of 
Matthew and Rachel (McPherson) Riley, her father a native of Irelard 
who came to the United States with his parents in boyhood, her mother a 
daughter of Irish parents, early settlers of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where she was born. Matthew Riley was a farmer, the owner of six hun- 
dred and forty acres of land in Baldwin and Mifflin townships, Allegheny 
county, and was also the proprietor of a saw mill. His death occurred when ■ 
he was seventy-three years of age, his wife dying two years earlier, at the 
same age. Children of Matthew and Rachel (McPherson) Riley: i. James, 
met an accidental death when thirty-three years of age, a heavy log in a saw 
mill falling upon him. 2. Elizabeth, died unmarried, aged eighty-two years. 
3. John, a farmer, died in 1913, his wife also deceased. 4. Josephine, de- 
ceased; was a sister in a convent at Newark, New Jersey. 5. M. Paula, 
a sister in a convent in Kansas City, Missouri. 6. Matthew, deceased, was 
an employee in a planing mill ; lived on Pittsburgh South Side. 7. Sarah, 
of previous mention, married Joseph A. Lutz. 8. Susan, married Edwin 
Boyle, and lived in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, until 
her death in 1901. Matthew and Rachel (McPherson) Riley were also the 
parents of five other children, who died while young. Children of Joseph 
A. and Sarah (Riley) Lutz: i. Daniel A., a carpenter, foreman in the car 
shops ; lives in Carrick, Pennsylvania. 2. Margaret, married Joseph Jordan ; 
resides on a farm in Fayette county, Pennsylvania. 3. Joseph A., of whom 
further. 4. Mary, married Winfield Haller ; lives in Mobile, Alabama. 5. 
John, a dairyman of Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Francis, met an accidental death in 1900, being struck by a train while cross- 
ing the tracks of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad with a team drawing a 
load of lumber. 7. Samuel, married Mary Weber; lives with his father in 
Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 8. Charles, married 
Mary Harkins ; lives with his father. 

(IV) Joseph A. (2) Lutz, son of Joseph A. (i) and Sarah (Riley) 
Lutz, was born in Scott township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Novem- 
ber 26, 1870. Until he was sixteen years of age he attended a country 
school in Mifflin township, then left school and worked with his father on 
the home farm until he was twenty-two years of age. At this age he em- 



642 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

barked in an unusual venture, buying a half interest in a circus and con- 
ducting this enterprise for one year, the show traveling as Stanley & Lutz, 
Mr. Lutz disposing of his interest at the end of the year. His next occupa- 
tion was as stationary engineer at a coal mine in Baldwin township, a posi- 
tion he held for twenty years, during which time the coal property was 
operated by three concerns, the Scully Coal Company, the Robbins' Coal 
Company, and the Pittsburgh Coal Company. Mr. Lutz moved to Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania, in 1904, five years later becoming owner and manager 
of the Floradora Hotel at No. 327 West Eighth avenue, which he conducts 
with profitable success at this time. He fraternizes with the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, while, with his family, he is a member of St. Mary Mag- 
dalene Roman Catholic Church. He professes no political affiliation, choos- 
ing his party by the calibre of men advanced as its candidates. 

Mr. Lutz married, December 30, 1896, Gertrude Catherine Abel, born 
in Miftiin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah (New) Abel, her father a farmer, her parents residents of Mifflin 
township. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Lutz: Coletta, born February 28, 
1898; Joseph L., November 16, 1900; Norbert, November 10, 1903; Leo, 
July 14, 1905; Gertrude, August 18, 1907; Harold, March 22, 1910; Her- 
man, December 2, 1912. 



The forebears of Rev. James M. Mcjunkin, of Oakdale, 
McJUNKIN Pennsylvania, were natives of Ireland from whence came 

his grandfather, William Mcjunkin, when a boy. He was 
reared by a Mr. McKim, of Baltimore, Maryland, with whom he lived until 
eighteen years of age, being at that age a practical wheelwright. He lo- 
cated in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in West Pike Run township, 
when a young man, worked at his trade for several years, then purchased a 
farm upon which he resided until his death at the age of eighty-one years. 
He married Mary Hanna, who died in middle age, also of Scotch-Irish 
parentage. Seven of their children grew to years of accountability : John, 
a farmer of Washington county, Pennsylvania, until his death ; James, a 
merchant of Washington county until his death ; William, died in young 
manhood; Alexander, of whom further; Milton, a farmer, first in Wash- 
ington, afterward in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, deceased; Mary, mar- 
ried a Mr. Gregg, and died in Washington county; Martha, married (first) 
Wilson Todd, (second) Daniel Hawk, and died near Livermore, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(II) Alexander Mcjunkin, son of William and Mary (Hanna) Mc- 
junkin, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, September 15, 1819, 
died at his farm in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Feb- 
ruary 2, 1887. He grew to manhood at the Washington county homestead, 
attended the public school, and was his father's assistant until his marriage. 
He worked the home farm for three years after his marriage, and in 1848 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 643 

moved to Allegheny county, purchasing a farm of 400 acres in Plum town- 
ship, which he cultivated until his death, lie was one of the prosperous 
farmers of Plum township, a trustee of Plum Creek Presbyterian Church 
for many years, and a man of prominence, lie was a Whig in politics until 
the formation of the Republican party, acting with that organization there- 
after. 

He married Margaret Couden Patterson, born in Payette county, Penn- 
sylvania, August 12, 1819, died July 28, 1898, at Oakdalc, J-'ennsylvania. 
Children: i. William Patterson, of whom further. ^. Rev. James Mont- 
gomery, of whom further. 3. George C, secretary of the Home Protective 
Building and Loan Association, of New Brighton, resides in Beaver, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. John C, died in boyhood. 5. Mary, died aged nineteen yearp 
6. Elizabeth J., died young. 7. Wilson, died aged three years. 8. Ella H., 
died in childhood. 

Margaret Couden (Patterson) McJunkin was a daughter of William C. 
and Hannah (Crawford) Patterson, her father a farmer of Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, owning a farm near Fayette City, moving about 1865 to Alle- 
gheny county. He was a well educated, well informed man, a leader and 
an elder in the United Presbyterian Church. He died aged seventy-seven 
years and is buried near Unity Station. Children: i. Elizabeth, died aged 
thirteen years. 2. Martha, married James Patterson, and died in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. 3. Margaret C, married Alexander Mc- 
Junkin, of previous mention. 4. Susan, married another James Patterson, 
not a relative, a farmer; she died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 5. Sarah, 
died unmarried. 6. Jane, died unmarried. 7. Mary, died unmarried, the 
three sisters all buried at Unity Station. 8. George, captain of Company 
C, One Hundred and Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was 
wounded in battle, died at Oakmont, Pennsylvania, and is buried at Unity 
Station. 9. Thomas, a farmer, buried with his brothers and sisters at Unitv. 
(HI) William Patterson McJunkin, eldest son of Alexander and Mar- 
garet Couden (Patterson) McJunkin, was born in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, October 8, 1845. He was educated in the public schools of 
Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and until he was thirty 
years of age worked on the home farm in that township. He then moved 
to Pittsburgh where he conducted a retail dairy business for twenty-five 
years. His business gre\v with each year and he was many times compelled 
to seek enlarged quarters, finally at Thirtieth and Liberty streets. In 1900 
the business was incorporated as The McJunkin Straight Dairy Companv 
with W. P. McJunkin as president. The business became the largest in 
Pittsburgh, dairy products being handled in both wholesale and retail. In 
1903 Mr. McJunkin retired and for the past three years has resided in 
Oakdale. He was the first man in the United States to pasteurize milk for 
commercial purposes, and was the first dealer in Pittsburgh to realize the 
responsibility of his business and the fact that the health of his patrons 
depended on the quality of the milk he served. He accepted this responsi- 



644 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

bility and set an example of sanitary handling and distributing that raised 
the business in Pittsburgh to a higher level than former dealers had ever 
dreamed of. He is at present a director of the Boys' Industrial Home at 
Oakdale, an institution in which he takes a deep interest, and manager of 
its farming operations. He is a Republican in politics, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Mcjunkin married, December 22, 1869, Adelaide M. Joyner, born 
in England, daughter of Martin Thomas and Susanna Amelia (Taylor) 
Joyner. Her parents came to the United States several years after their 
marriage, settling in Plum township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 
1850. Martin T. Joyner was a blacksmith and the owner of a good farm 
which he managed in his later years. Children: Elizabeth H., resides at 
New Texas, Pennsylvania, unmarried; Maria jane, married D. E. Sheridan, 
whom she survives, a resident of Pittsburgh, East End ; Adelaide M., mar- 
ried William Patterson Mcjunkin, of previous mention, no issue. 

(Ill) Rev. Dr. James Montgomery Mcjunkin, son of Alexander and 
Margaret Couden (Patterson) Mcjunkin, was born near Brownsville, Penn- 
sylvania, September 21, 1847. He obtained his early education in the public 
schools and prepared for college under private tutors and in the summer 
schools, one of his tutors being Hon. S. A. McClung. He taught school 
for six years, continuing his own studies in the meantime, entering Wash- 
ington and JefTerson College in 1873 in the sophomore year so well had he 
prepared himself, and was graduated with highest honors, class of 1876. He 
then studied theology at Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny City, 
Pennsylvania, completed the course and was graduated in class of 1879. He 
was ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church, installed pastor of the 
church at Oakdale in May, 1879. He continued the faithful pastor of that 
congregation twenty-seven years, ill health finally compelling his resignation 
in 1906. For five years during this period he was also principal of Oakdale 
Academy, successfully meeting his dual responsibilities. In 1886 he was 
chosen as the representative from the Pittsburgh Presbytery to serve on 
the Permanent Home Mission Committee of Synod of Pennsylvania, be- 
coming in July, 1890, corresponding secretary of the committee, and in 
1906 the office of treasurer was added to that of secretary, which dual 
position he yet holds. In 1898 he received from his Alma Mater the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. He has also served for twenty years as a member of 
the board of directors of the Western Theological Seminary from which he 
was graduated. 

The congregation over which Dr. Mcjunkin was so long the pastor 
erected its first church in 1869 on State street. In 1884 the congregation 
had outgrown the first small church and was compelled to enlarge it. In 
1912 the present brick edifice was erected, an imposing structure, and a 
splendidly equipped modern house of worship. During his pastorate the 
congregation increased in numbers from one hundred and thirty to four 
hundred, and all departments of church work prospered under his faithful 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 645 

guidance, lie has ever been a strong oj>ponent to licensed liquor celling 
and it is largely through his influence that there has never been a saloon in 
Oakdale. He is a member of the Eclectic Club of Ministers, of I'itt bnrgh, 
and in political faith is a Republican. 

Rev. Dr. Mcjunkin married, December 21, 1H71, Elizabeth Jane Alter, 
born in Plum lownshij), Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Oeorge 
B. and Eva (Stotler) Alter, anrl grandflaughter of Jacob and Jane dJratonj 
Alter, the latter early settlers of Plum township; Jacob a blacksmith. George 
B. Alter was born in Plum township about 1822, his wife in 1824. After 
their marriage they bought a farm in Plum township, prospered and be- 
came the owners of other farms. They retired to the village of New Texas 
in 1890 where Eva (Stotler) Alter died in 1904, George B. Alter in 1907. 
Both were members of the Presbyterian Church in which he served as 
elder for nearly fifty years. They were the parents of nine children, three 
dying in infancy: i. Emanuel, a farmer, died in Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Elizabeth Jane, married Rev. Dr. James M. Mcjunkin, of 
previous mention, no issue. 3. Samuel Crawford, now residing on the home- 
stead. 4. William Henry, died in young manhood. 5. Mary Ella, married 
W. W. Alter, and resides in Kirkland. Missouri. 6. Margaret Catherine, 
married Rev. J. C. Kistler, D.D., resides in Houston, Pennsylvania. 



More than two hundred years have elapsed since Isaac 
SUMNEY Sumney, a native of Germany, founded his line in Pennsyl- 
vania. He arrived in this country about 1710, making his 
home in the vicinity of Philadelphia, and there joined the original Quaker 
settlers in industrious pursuits. He married and was the father of two 
sons, Isaac, and Jacob, the line to Dr. Erank Ebster Sumney, of Eh-avos- 
burg, Pennsylvania, continuing through the latter. 

(II) Isaac (2) Sumney, son of Isaac (i) Sumney, grew to manhood at 
his father's home near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and later moved to Mont- 
gomery county, where he owned extensive tracts of land. About 1755 he 
erected a log hotel, which is standing to the present time, the settlement 
which grew up in this locality being known as Sumneytow^n. now located 
on the Perkiomen branch of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. Isaac 
Sumney married, the children of his union all daughters, so that the line 
from the first Isaac found its only perpetuation through Jacob, of whom 
further. 

(II) Jacob Sumney, son of Isaac (i) Sumney, after arriving at man's 
estate became a farmer, making his home in Berks county, Pennsylvania^ 
He married and was the father of two sons. Isaac and Jacob (2). 

(HI) Jacob (2) Sumney. son of Jacob (i) Sumney. passed his life in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania, his birthplace. His occupation w-as that of 
his father, agriculture, and he prospered in that calling. He married and 
had several children, among them Isaac, of whom further, Jacob, Thomas, 
Samuel, 



646 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(IV) Isaac (2) Sumney, son of Jacob (2) Sumney, was born in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1776, died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 
While a youth he made settlement in Westmoreland county, and five years 
later, about 1800, moved to Nottingham township, Washington county, 
where he owned and cultivated land. He was a communicant of the Luth- 
eran Church. He married Mary Turney, rearing his five sons to useful 
occupations, all of them becoming farmers or artisans. Children of Isaac 
and Mary (Turney) Sumney, all of whom, with the exception of Elizabeth, 
died in Washington county, Pennsylvania : John ; William, died aged ninety- 
two years; Isaac, a carpenter; David, of whom further; Jacob, died in boy- 
hood ; Elizabeth ; Sarah ; Mary ; Hannah. 

(V) David Sumney, son of Isaac (2) and Mary (Turney) Sumney, 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1808, died in 1892. He 
was reared to manhood on the home farm, and became a teamster on the 
old National Pike, abandoning this calling and becoming proprietor of a 
pottery, having learned the potter's trade in young manhood. He passed 
his latter years on a small farm, his death occurring when he had attained 
his eighty- fourth year. He married Nancy, born in 1808, died in 1901, 
daughter of John Hand, her father a saddler of Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania. Children of David and Nancy (Hand) Sumney: i. William, a 
carpenter, died in Monongahela City, Pennsylvania. 2. John, a veteran of 
the Civil War, having been a soldier for three and one-half years in the 
One Hundred and Fortieth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
now lives retired in Los Angeles, California. 3. David, a farmer and car- 
penter, lives in Washington county, Pennsylvania ; he is also a veteran of 
the war between the states, having fought in the same regiment as his 
brother, John. 4. Daniel, a farmer, died in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, aged fifty-five years. 5. Isaac, of whom further. 6. Frank, proprietor 
of a livery business and a dealer in feed, resides in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. 7. Elizabeth, died in Washington county, Pennsylvania, mar- 
ried (first) John Helt, (second) Peter Devore. 8. Mary, married John 
Young ; died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 9. Maria, married James 
Gault, died in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1913. 10. Isabel, mar- 
ried James Gilmore, deceased, and resides in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania. II. Julia, deceased, married Isaac Wolf. 

(VI) Isaac (3) Sumney, son of David and Nancy (Hand) Sumney, 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, November 13, 1842. After 
completing his youthful studies in the public schools, he learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, following this for a time and then forsaking it to engage in 
farming. He became the owner of land in Nottingham township, devoting 
his entire breadth of acres to fruit culture, in which line he was unusually 
successful. Here he passed his remaining years, holding a position in the 
front rank of the county's agriculturists because of the excellent results he 
obtained from his operations, and receiving the universal commendation of 
his neighbors as a man of upright life and honorable motives. His church 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 647 

was the Presbyterian, and he was a Democrat in poHtics, fraternizing with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Isaac Sumney died May 30, 19 12. 
He married, April 15, 1863, Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin and y\nna 
(Keller) Foster, her father having come to Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, from England about 1825, settling in Monongahela City, her mother 
a member of a family long seated in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren of Isaac and Elizabeth (Foster) Sumney: i. Frank Foster, of whom 
further. 2. Grace, married Sheldon Wolfe, and resides in Washington, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Alice, married B. I^I. Cannon, their home being in Pitts- 
burgh. 4. Gertrude, married F. W. Scott, and lives in Duquesne, Penn- 
sylvania. 5. Harriet, married Dr. Boyd E. Gamble, and lives in Van Voor- 
his, Pennsylvania. 6. Roy, married Anna Smiley, and resides in Bcntley- 
ville, Pennsylvania, where he is connected with mining interests. 

(VII) Dr. Frank Foster Sumney, son of Isaac (3) and Elizabeth 
(Foster) Sumney, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, April 3, 
1866. He attended the public schools, and after there pursuing preliminary 
studies entered Jefiferson Academy at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, later 
matriculating at the University of Western Pennsylvania (University of 
Pittsburgh). In this last named institution he prepared for the practice 
of medicine, and was awarded his M.D. in March, 1891. Dravosburg, 
Pennsylvania, has been the one scene of his professional activity, his practice 
general in nature, and he is accorded worthy place among his medical 
brethren. He holds membership in the County and State Medical societies 
and the McKeesport Academy of Medicine. Dr. Sumney is identified with 
the Knights of Malta, the Knights of Pythias, the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
His political preferences are Democratic, and he has filled numerous of the 
local ofifices, and was appointed postmaster of Dravosburg in 1914. 

Dr. Sumney married, June 6, 1894, Elizabeth, born in Homestead, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of James N. and Fannie (Orsborne) Lawson, and has 
children: Ruth, a student in the California State Normal School; Weir, 
Janet, Frank, died in infancy. 



The name of Baird, Bard, Barde, appears in records in various 
BAIRD parts of Europe as early as the tenth century and extending 

to the fourteenth century. They appear to have migrated from 
Lorraine to d'Aosta in Piedmont, and from there to Normandy, finally 
settling in Scotland. In his "Irish Genealogy," MacForbes treats it as a 
joke that the Bairds claim an Anglo-Saxon origin, his contention being 
that their origin is Celtic. In "Irish Pedigrees." of which Dr. 0"Hart is 
the author, he says : "Owen Mac an Bhaird. of Monycassen. was descended 
from Eocha. son of Sodhan. Mac an Bhaird was anglicized Macward, and 
modernized Ward. The descendants of Owen Mac an Bhaird rendered the 
name O'Bairdam, and that in turn has been anglicized Baird. Bard. Barde. 
Barden, Bardirt, Barten, Bartin, Berdan, Purdon, \'erdon and Warden. 



648 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

In 1066 Seigneur de Barde was among the followers of William the Con- 
queror. In 1 178 Henry de Barde was a w'itness to a charter of lands made 
by King William the Lion, of Scotland. In 1191 Ugone di Bard, of the 
valley of d'Aosta, made allegiance to Francis I., of Savoy. He owned a 
castle on Bard Rock, a natural defence, and after bravely defending the 
place, was driven out. In 1194 Hugo de Baird was one of the subscribing 
witnesses to a safe conduct granted by King Richard I., of England, to 
King William the Lion, and it is said that a gentleman by the name of Baird 
saved William the Lion from a wild beast, and for this deed received large 
tracts of land and a coat-of-arms : A boar passant, with the motto : Dominus 
fecit. During the Scotch war for independence the Bards were able sup- 
porters of the cause with Bruce and Wallace. Robert Bard was captured 
by the English, held a prisoner at Nottingham, and an order was issued, 
January, 1317, for his removal to the castle of Summerton, but his fate is 
unknown. A William Bard was routed and taken prisoner with Sir William 
Douglass in 1333, in a skirmish with Sir Anthony Lacy on the English 
border. Jordan Baird was a constant companion to the brave William Wal- 
lace from 1297 to 1305. General Sir David Baird was a contemporary of 
Captain David Baird, and held command under Sir John Moore in the 
peninsular campaign, and after the death and burial of Sir John, succeeded 
to the command and reported the victory at Corrunna. He was the son of 
Sir William Baird, the son of Sir Robert, the son of James, the son of 
George, who was living in 1588. All the Bairds now in America trace from 
these ancestors. 

(I) Hugh Baird, who lived and died in Ayrshire, Scotland, was a mine 
foreman and manager at Annach Lodge, near Irvine, in Ayrshire, but his 
death occurred at Port Glasgow. 

(II) John Baird, son of Hugh Baird, was born in Ireland, but reared in 
Scotland. For some years after his marriage he lived at Dalrye, Scotland. 
He also was a miner, became a foreman, and spent the last twenty-one years 
of his life at Annach Lodge. He married Margaret Flack, born in Johns- 
ton, Scotland, died at Annach Lodge, and they had children : Margaret, 
died in Scotland ; Isabella, married Alexander McNeil, and died in Mother- 
well, Scotland ; Jeannette, married William Galbraith, and died in Scotland ; 
Jennie, widow of Robert Weir, lives in McKeesport, Pennsylvania ; two who 
died unnamed ; Hugh. 

(HI) Hugh (2) Baird, son of John and Margaret (Flack) Baird, was 
born at Dalrye, Scotland, January 5, 1848. After his marriage he settled at 
Annach Lodge, where he was a mechanical engineer for about ten years, 
then removed to Garcorsch, where he was similarly employed for some 
years. During the next six years he was in the employ of the Clydesdale 
Iron Company and then, in 1882, came to America and settled at McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, where he was in the employ of the National Tube Com- 
pany two years. Removing to Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, he worked for 
the Lehigh Valley Coal Company fifteen years, then returned to McKees- 



WI'lSTiCKN JMCNXSYLVAXIA 640 

port, and is ikiw rliicf ciij^inccr of the National 'lube VV'orks. lit is Kc- 
publican in polilical mailers, ami In- anfl his wife arc members of the F'ir-.t 
Presbyterian (liurcii. lie is a charter member of the Scottish clans, Mr. 
Baird married, in I1S69, J'Llizabeth (Jhalniers, born in the parish of halkirk, 
Polemone, Scotland, March 27, 1^49. Slie is a dau^diter of William and 
Katherine (Benney) Chalmers, both born in f'alkirk, Sterlingshire, Scfjt- 
land. He was a superintendent >>( c(;llieries for the Cjran^emouth Coal 
Company for more than thirty years, anfl died and is buried at Falkirk. They 
had children: John, died in Scotland at the age of twenty-five year.-, ; Jennie, 
married Alexander Carr, and died in Glasgow ; a child which died in infancy ; 
Elizabeth, mentioned above as the wife of Mr. Baird; Katherine, married 
William Robison, and lives in Dumfermline, Scotland; William, a master 
mechanic, died in Annapolis, Maryland ; Thomas, chief of police of the 
Carnegie Steel Company, lives at Clairton ; Margaret, married John Cron- 
ney, and lives in Glasgow ; Allison, married John Jarvis, and lives in Grange- 
mouth, Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Baird had children: John, chief shipper 
for the National Tube Company, lives in Lorraine, Ohio ; William, a phy- 
sician, died in McKeesport in 191 1 ; Archibald, died at the age of eighteen 
years; Thomas Chalmers, of further mention; Katherine, died at the age of 
thirteen years ; Hugh, died at the age of seven years ; James, a clerk in a 
store in McKeesport ; Elizabeth, a kindergarten teacher, lives with her 
parents. 

(IV) Thomas Chalmers Baird, son of Hugh (2) and Elizabeth (Chalm- 
ers) Baird, v^'as born in Garcorsch, Lanarkshire, Scotland, March i, 1876. 
He received his education in the elementary and high schools of Shenandoah, 
and at a business college, and was w'ell equipped to engage in the battle of 
life. For a time he was a clerk at Packer No. 4, on the Mahanoy Division 
of the Lehigh Valley Coal Company, and in 1897 came to McKeesport, and 
was employed in a drug store here for a short period. During six month? 
he worked for Weir & Mclntyre, street and paving contractors, then became 
assistant accountant for the National Rolling Mill Company, remaining for 
two and a half years. His next position was that of assistant paymaster 
at the American Tin Plating Company's plant at Demmler, Pennsylvania, 
where he remained one year, when he was advanced to the office of pay- 
master, which he filled for two and a half years. One and a half years 
were then spent in the office of teller of the National Bank of McKeesport. 
after which he accepted the position of cashier at the Citizens' Bank at 
Braddock, and when this became merged, at the end of two and a half 
years, with the Braddock Trust Company, iMr. Baird became the assistant 
secretary-treasurer of the latter, and held this position one and a half years. 
He was elected cashier of the City Bank of McKeesport, April i, IQ06. suc- 
ceeding W. H. Coleman, the present clerk of courts for Allegheny county. 
This institution has been showing a very satisfactory rate of growth, having 
gained almost a quarter of a million dollars during the four years from No- 
vember I, 1909, to November i, 1913. He is a staunch supporter of the 



650 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Republican party, but has never aspired to holding public office. He and 
his wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church, and his fraternal 
affiliations are with the Free and Accepted Masons, Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, Scottish Clans and Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Baird married, August 5, 1897, Ellen, born in Glasgow, Scotland, 
a daughter of Richard and Ellen Bow, who came to America about 1880. 
Children : Thelma Margaret, born December 8, 1898 ; Thomas Chalmers Jr., 
born October 11, 1903. 



The Kessler family, which came to the United States from 
KESSLER Germany, has been identified with professional life and high 

official position both in Germany and here, and many of the 
name have gained distinction. The younger generations in the United States 
have added to the prestige of the family name, as is especially shown by the 
branch now resident in Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

William Kessler was born in Baden, Germany, and came to the United 
States at the age of twenty-one years, in company with his brothers Antony 
and Joseph. For a time he lived in Newark, New Jersey, but soon after his 
marriage he removed to Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. He was engaged in 
the woolen industry, being part owner of a factory, and continued in this 
line when he removed to Loretto, Cambria county, Pennsylvania. In 1880 
he removed to Pittsburgh, later to Homestead, where his death occurred 
one year later. Mr. Kessler was always independent in his political opin- 
ions, and while he consistently refused to accept public office, his fellow citi- 
zens held him in such high esteem that, while living in Loretto, they nom- 
inated him for the legislature without his previous knowledge. When the 
news of the nomination was brought to him. he absolutely refused to be- 
come a candidate for the office. He and his wife were members of the Ger- 
man Catholic Church. Mr. Kessler married, in Newark, New Jersey, Mary 
Cleamings, who was born near Frankfort-on-the-Main. Germany, brought 
to this country at the age of two years by her parents, and died in Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania, in 1905, at the age of eighty-four years. Her parents 
died not long after their arrival in America, leaving Mrs. Kessler an orphan 
at an early age. Children : Frances, married Henry C. Litzinger, and lives 
in Butler county, Pennsylvania ; Kate C, principal of the First Ward Public 
School of Homestead; Joseph T., an oil operator, living in Butler county; 
William A., of further mention ; Emma, lives in Homestead with her brother, 
William A. ; four children died young. 

William A. Kessler, son of William and Mary (Cleamings) Kessler, 
was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1864. His education was 
a practical and substantial one, and was acquired in the public schools of 
Philadelphia and Loretto, supplemented by a thorough course at St. Francis 
College. He was seventeen years of age when he removed to Pittsburgh with 
his parents, and there engaged in the grocery business at the corner of 
Thirty-fifth and Penn avenues. Removing to Homestead in 1881, he formed 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 651 

a connection with the firm of Bryce, Higbee & Company, glass manufac- 
turers, which continued until 1887. Mr Kcssler is possessed of executive 
ability of an unusually high order, as is evidenced by the number of im- 
portant enterprises with which he is and has been connected. He was one 
of the organizers of the Bank of I lomestead, and was cashier of this insti- 
tution for a number of years. He was also one of the organizers of the 
old Homestead Telephone Company and the German Building and Loan 
Association, and of a number of other enterprises. At the present time he 
is president of the Pennsylvania Lumber Company, manager and treasurer 
of the Cambria Lumber Company, president of the Homestead Mantle and 
Tile Company, secretary of Homestead Park Amusement Company, and 
director of the High Grade Oil Refining Company of Butler. His first con- 
nection with the lumber interests was in 1905, his many other official duties 
having prior to that time engaged too much of his attention. His success 
has been amply attested, and in their extensive operations they employ from 
forty to one hundred men. He served as the principal assessor for the 
borough of Homestead three years, and in 1887 was elected by a large ma- 
jority as collector of taxes, an office in which he served five consecutive terms. 
He has always given his allegiance to the Democratic party, and served as a 
member of the board of health three years. During the two terms he was 
a member of the school board he did excellent work, and he has also been 
a member of the borough council. He has now been in public offtce for 
many years, being at present chairman of the Democratic party committee 
in Homestead, and in all this time there has never been the slightest blemish 
in his public career. When he received the Democratic endorsement for the 
legislature, it was unsolicited by him, but his party recognized the fact 
that Mr. Kessler stood high in the opinion of members of all political 
parties, and would poll many votes because of his high business and social 
standing. 

Mr. Kessler's connection with various organizations is as follows : 
President of the Firemen's Relief Association; honorary vice-president of 
the Pennsylvania State Firemen's Association ; ex-president of the Western 
Pennsylvania Firemen's Association ; president of the Honorary Members 
of the Grand Army of the Republic ; charter member of the local order of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and also of the Owls; mem- 
ber of the Business Men's Association, the Loretto Club of Allegheny 
County and the Second Ward Fire Company. He resides with his sisters 
in a beautiful house on Fifth avenue, and is the owner of a considerable 
amount of other valuable real estate. Mr. Kessler is a man of liberal 
ideas and broad-minded views, and gives generous support to every project 
which tends to the betterment or advancement of the community in any 
direction. The causes of art. literature and education especially appeal 
to him. 



652 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

County Down, Ireland, was for many years the home 
WILKINSON of this branch of Wilkinsons, and in that land farming 

was the family occupation. Presbyterianism is the fam- 
ily faith. Samuel Wilkinson was born in county Down, Ireland, in 1805, 
there died in 1894. His entire life was spent in the county of his birth and 
besides owning a small farm he conducted retail dealings in crockery. He 
and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He married Jane 
Bear, born in county Down, Ireland, in 1807, died there in -1896, both she 
and her husband having attained the unusually advanced age of eighty-nine 
years. They were the parents of: i. William, the first of the family to 
immigrate to the United States, died in Texas, where he owned a farm 
one hundred and sixty acres in extent. 2. James, proprietor of a hotel, died 
in Dallas, Texas. 3. Samuel (2), of whom further. 4. Susan, married 
in Ireland and there died. 5. Elizabeth, married Jesse McCart, a railroad 
engineer, and lives in Dallas, Texas. 6. Arthur, died in Wilkinsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 7. John, resides on the hoine farm in county Down, Ireland. 

(II) Samuel (2) Wilkinson, son of Samuel (i) and Jane (Bear) Wil- 
kinson, was born in county Down, Ireland, in 1838. In his youth he was 
favored with but few educational advantages, when ten years of age begin- 
ning regular work upon the farm, which he continued for eight years. At 
the end of this time, when he was eighteen years old, he and his younger 
brother, Arthur, came to the L^nited States, locating in Pittsburgh, obtaining 
his first position in the employ of W. H. Brown, loading coal along the 
Monongahela river for three years. He was then for a long time a miner 
on the coal property of John A. Roberts, also holding a position in the boat- 
building yards of Horner & Roberts for several years. The following 
thirty years he passed in dififerent places along the river, accepting positions 
at whatever callings ofl^ered the best inducements, taking advantage of every 
favorable turn in the industrial conditions of the locality to better his ma- 
terial welfare, and in 1879 moved to Homestead, Pennsylvania, where for 
six years he was street commissioner. Real estate has been the form of 
investment that he has most favored all of his life, and to this use he has 
put the means that he has acquired through industrious and diligent toil, 
having chosen his property with such wise judgment that in nearly every 
instance its value has risen appreciably, and as far as worldly welfare is 
concerned he is independent. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married, in 
November, 1862, Elizabeth Jones, born in Glamorganshire, Wales, August 
22, 1833. died March 19, 1907, daughter of Solomon and Mary Jones. She 
came to the United States with her parents when four years of age, living 
first in Philadelphia, later proceeding westward to Pittsburgh, where she 
grew to maturity and where she was married. Children of Samuel (2) 
and Elizabeth (Jones) Wilkinson: i. William James, of whom further. 
2. Samuel Solomon, died aged four years. 

(III) William James Wilkinson, son of Samuel (2) and Elizabeth 



WESTERN l'J-:NNSYLVANiA 653 

(Jonc'Sj VVilkinsfju, was born in ijaldwin lownsliip, Allcf^lieny county, J'enn- 
sylvania, May 24, 1870. When nine years of age he was brought to Jiome- 
stead, Pennsylvania, where he obtained the greater part of his education. 
At the age of fifteen years he entered the employ of tiie Carnegie Steel 
Company as messenger, later finding service in the open hearth department. 
Through various grades of employment he gradually advanced to the posi- 
tion of assistant superintendent and then to the superintendency, passing 
ten years in the two last named capacities with mutual satisfaction to him- 
self and his employers. In 19 10 he discontinued his association with this 
concern and formed a partnership with a brother-in-law, C. K. Andrews, 
in the handling of builder's supplies, operating under the firm name of 
Andrews & Wilkinson, a relation that continues to the present time, the 
ofifijCes of the firm being in the German National Bank Building, in Pitts- 
burgh. For about fifteen years prior to the formation of the above-men- 
tioned firm Mr. Andrews had been traveling in the interests of a firm han- 
dling that line, and combining his experience and the vigorous enthusiasm 
and energy of both partners the reason for the firm's success is not difficult 
to discover. Among the specialties handled by Andrews & Wilkinson are 
sewer pipe, clay products of all kinds, and slate, and the field into which 
their activities extends includes Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Vir- 
ginia, Maryland, New York, New Jersey and Delaware, the firm every- 
where being favorably known, their methods meeting with universal ap- 
proval, and their products of the highest grade. Mr. Wilkinson was one 
of the organizers and is now a director of the First National Bank of 
Munhall, his other business interests confined to a place upon the directorate 
of the Nezvs Messenger, the Homestead daily, Mr. Wilkinson's residence 
being in that place. Party affiliation is not a part of Mr. Wilkinson's politi- 
cal action, and he belongs to Homestead Lodge, No. 650, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, is an honorary member of the Grand i\rmy of 
the Republic, and holds the thirty-second degree in the Masonic Order, 
holding membership in Homestead Lodge, No. 582, Free and Accepted 
Masons, Zerubabel Chapter, No. 162, Royal Arch Masons, Commandery 
No. I, Knights Templar, Pittsburgh Consistory, and Syria Temple, Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Wilkinson married, December 18, 1900, Sarah Lillian Andrews, 
born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Henry C. and Eliza 
(McClure) Andrews. Henry C. Andrews, a native of Pittsburgh, was 
a grandson of the founder of the Presbyterian Banner, this Andrews being 
also for a time the editor of that periodical. Henry C. Andrews was by pro- 
fession a druggist, and after his marriage in Pittsburgh was a resident of 
several places in western Pennsylvania, in Clarion county holding a posi- 
tion as superintendent of an oil works, his death occurring in Pittsburgh, 
he being buried in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was a veteran of the Civil 
War, having served through that entire conflict as a member of a Penn- 
sylvania regiment of infantry, assistant to the surgeon, Dr. McCann. Henry 



654 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

C. and Eliza (McClure) Andrews were the parents of: i. Ida, married 
Horton Penrose, and resides at No. 2i6 Linden street, Pittsburgh. 2. Wil- 
liam, deceased. 3. Harry, deceased. 4. Cyrus K., a member of the firm of 
Andrews &. Wilkinson, resides on Craig street, Pittsburgh. 5. Sarah Lillian, 
of previous mention, married William James Wilkinson. 6. Jessie, died in 
infancy. Children of William James and Sarah Lillian (Andrews) Wil- 
kinson: I. Sarah Elizabeth, born December 14, 1902. 2. William Samuel, 
born April 22, 1905. 



There is a Bible now in the possession of the Corey family of 
COREY Braddock, Pennsylvania, which has the record of nine genera- 
tions of this family. It was given to John Cory, as the name 
was then spelled, the American progenitor of the family, by his mother in 
1626, when she bade him farewell as he left his home in Scotland to try 
his fortune in America. John Cory landed at or near Boston, Massachu- 
setts, soon after the first landing of the "Mayflower," and for a time lived 
at New London, Connecticut, where his marriage took place. Later he 
crossed Long Island sound, and lived at Southampton, where the records 
show that, on March 7, 1644, he was whale commissioner for the district of 
Southampton. He died at Hashomornack, Long Island, in 1665, leaving 
four sons and two daughters. Two of his brothers and two of his cousins 
came to this country prior to his death, and Giles Cory, the witchcraft 
martyr of Salem, who was executed, in September, 1692, was a cousin or 
possibly a brother of John Cory. At his death, John Cory willed his Bible 
to his son Elnathan, and the family lived on Long Island and Manhattan 
Island during five generations. 

(VII) Benijah Corey, a descendant in the seventh generation of the 
American progenitor, was born in Burlington, Vermont, October 24, 1778, 
died March 4, 1870, at the home of his son, John Nelson Corey, near Fort 
W^ayne, Indiana. Immediately after his marriage he purchased three hun- 
dred acres of land, which are now the heart of New York City. They 
cleared this and placed it under cultivation, in which they were very suc- 
cessful, but, owing to the depredations of neighboring children, Mr. Corey, 
much against the wishes of his wife and children, sold this property and 
removed to the wilds of Pennsylvania, where he purchased another farm, 
and cleared this, it now being a part of Jefiferson City, Pennsylvania. When 
this section commenced to be more thickly settled, Mr. Corey sold it also, 
and removed to near Fort Wayne, Indiana, which he later sold for a similar 
reason, and purchased another farm at Peru, Indiana, which is now in the 
suburbs of that city. At this place he and his wife contracted fever and 
ague, and this, combined with the infirmities of old age, forced them to 
visit their three sons who were living at Port Perry, Pennsylvania, on the 
banks of the Monongahela river. Mr. Corey was a John We.sley Methodist, 
wa'^ a class leader in this church fifty-five years, and prided himself upon 
not havine missed a single Sabbath in all of this long period. Mr. Corey 
married, February 20, T799, Deborah Talferd Williams, a Quakeress, who 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 655 

was born SciJtcmbcr 10, i/'So, flicl Aiij^usl 25, 1H72, at tlic home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Lydia VV. Stouts, in Wheeling, West Virginia. Children: 
Anna, born February 20, 1800; John, born July 4, 1802; Alfred, of further 
mention; Moses, born June 9, 1806; Charles Wesley, born June 19, j8ii; 
Lewis, born September 11, 1813; John Nelson, born January 27, 1816; 
Lydia W., born May 17, 1818; Phoebe J., born April 4, 1821 ; Deborah M., 
born July 5, 1823; Elizabeth P. and Barkley, born November 6, 1825. Jn 
his earlier years Mr. Corey was a millwright. 

(VIII) Alfred Corey, son of Benijah and Deborah Talferd (Williams; 
Corey, was born on the present site of New York City, April 6, 1804, died 
April 6, 1891. At the age of nineteen years he came to Jefiferson county, 
Pennsylvania, with his parents, and there learned the millwright's trade 
from his father, as did his brother Moses. As soon as he and his brother 
had attained manhood, they established themselves as contractors and con- 
structed several sections of the Sandy and Beaver canals. In 1839 they 
took the contract for constructing lock and dam No. 2, across the Monon- 
gahela river, at Port Perry, Pennsylvania, and moved their families down 
there from Edinburg, Mercer county. Charles Wesley Corey, another 
brother, moved his family there at the same time ; he had married Julia 
Ann Sailor. After the completion of this lock and dam, Alfred and Moses 
Corey decided they would invest their profits from this enterprise in the 
mercantile business. Tliey went to New York City in order to buy a stock 
of goods, this being their first visit to the city since they had left it in 1823. 
Huge houses and hotels were now standing on the ground which they had 
cleared with such effort, and they realized there had been a great lack of 
foresight. Subsequently, Alfred and Moses Corey agreed to pay nine 
thousand dollars' for the Braddock farm and seven thousand dollars for 
the Oliver farm in Allegheny county. Moses was given the choice of the 
farms, but he refused to take either, saying he had grubbed enough, and if 
Alfred chose to "blow in" his share of the money they had earned, he could 
do so. They discussed this matter all night long, and Alfred went to the 
city of Pittsburgh the next day, and forfeited the five hundred dollars which 
he had paid as a deposit. The two farms are now covered with costlier 
structures than those which covered the New York farms in 1846. Upon 
their return from New York City with their stock of goods, the Corey 
brothers applied themselves to mercantile interests, but Alfred soon tired 
of this form of business life, and sold his stock to Samuel Walker, father- 
in-law of the late James G. Blaine, taking his notes in payment ; Walker 
failed, and paid the notes with a bankrupt ticket. Moses Corey, being 
unsuccessful in his store in Pittsburgh, traded his stock of goods for the 
lease of a coal mine under Mount Washington, now one of the wards of 
the city of Pittsburgh. He married Lydia Adams, a sister of the wife of 
his brother Alfred. 

Alfred Corey married. April 25. 1831, Rachel Adams, who was a ven.- 
devout Methodist, and established the first Sunday school held in the state 



656 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of Pennsylvania. She died April 6, 1881. Children: i. James Benijah, 
of further mention. 2. Matilda Jane, born August 15, 1834, died at Port- 
land, Oregon, April 3, 1894; she married (first) Rev. Joseph Walters, 
(second) J. K. Phillips. 3. Eliza Ann, born September 25, 1837; married 
William Whittaker ; she has four sons and one daughter, the latter married, 
and they all live together at Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, about four miles 
from her childhood home. 4. Lida, born at Port Perry, October 23, 1840; 
married John Baldrige Jr., now^ deceased; reared eight children; she now 
lives at Braddock, Pennsylvania. 5. William Augustus, born November 
10, 1842, died of scarlet fever, September 28, 1843. 6. Rachel Deborah, 

born September 6, 1844; married Kline, and died leaving an only son, 

William Corey Kline, now a sailor on Lake Erie. 7. John D., born at Port 
Perry, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, December 17, 1846; went west in 
early manhood, and became a conductor on a railroad in Missouri ; he 
was murdered by a drunken brakeman whom he had discharged, the latter 
stabbing him in the back. 8. Lewis Cass, born April 14, 1849; has a farm 
near Jackson, Mississippi. 

(IX) James Benijah Corey, son of James and Rachel (Adams) Corey, 
was born near Utica, Venango county, Pennsylvania, April 23, 1832. His 
educational advantages consisted of five, terms, of four months each, at the 
public school, when those who were able to pay subscribed one dollar a 
month each, and those who were unable to pay in money, took turns in 
boarding the teacher. His school books were the few simple ones in use in 
those days. While a young lad he earned a prize by committing to mem- 
ory more than eleven hundred verses from the Bible, and this feat was 
accomplished in the course of one week. This was in 1845, ^"d two years 
later, when General Winfield Scott was touring the United States, prior to 
the presidential election, he passed the lock on the Monongahela river near 
which young Corey lived. A crowd had assembled to greet General Scott, 
and one of the General's party,. Attorney McCandless, who knew the lad, 
introduced him to General Scott, saying "General, this boy committed the 
whole of St. John and eight chapters in Acts to memory in one week." 
(1,132 verses.) An old sailor who fought on Lake Erie in 1812 under 
Commodore Perry laid his hand on Mr. Corey's head, and said : "James, 
treasure those verses in your heart ; if they do not make you the president 
of the United States, they will make you a good man." 

In the fall of 1849 Mr. Corey piloted his first pair of coal boats down 
the Ohio river, and as he was not eighteen years of age, he was known as 
the "Boy Pilot." From pilot to partner was a short step for the energetic 
young man, and it was but a few years later that the firm of J. B. Corey & 
Company was formed. His partners in this enterprise were David Shaw, 
George M. Bowman, John H. Peterson and Judge Thomas Mellon, of 
Pittsburgh, and they transported coal to the southern river ports. At the 
outbreak of the Civil War, the Confederate States confiscated all the coal 
of northern men, and as the firm had a large stock of coal in New Orleans, 



WESTERN J'ICXXSYLVAXIA 657 

their loss was about $50,000, hut llicy eventually weathered this storm. Mr. 
Corey was desirous of servinfj his country during the war, but was rejected 
on account of physical disability. As the coal business was at a standstill, 
he went to VVashinf^tfju, District of Columbia, and became a clerk in the 
commissary department, issuing rations to soldiers, at a monthly pay of 
$50.00. President Lincoln, Secretary Cameron and Secretary Chase gave 
this department their jjcrscjual attention, and Mr. Corey was in daily con- 
tact with them. At the close of the war the coal business was resumed, and 
they operated several mines along the Monongahela river, the Duquesne 
mines being among the largest, and of these Mr. Corey was manager. He 
was possessed of remarkable executive ability, and had the happy faculty 
of understanding the men in his employ, of winning their confidence and 
their affection, and during the thirty years he was connected with the coaT 
business he never had a strike. During three periods of strikes in other 
mines, Mr. Corey's company supplied the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
with coal, and to this day the obligation thus incurred by the railroad com- 
pany is acknowledged by it. June i, 1885, in as.sociation with his cousin, 
Alfred A. Corey Sr., the Corey Coal Company was formed, William Ellis 
Corey, son of Alfred A., and later president of the United States Steel 
Corporation, acting as weighmaster and bookkeeper. At the end of five 
years, Alfred A. Corey withdrew from the company, and was succeeded 
by William M. Dixon. Since 1900 Mr. Corey has lived retired from busi- 
ness responsibilities, on Jones avenue, Braddock. Pennsylvania, his favorite 
form of exercise being the driving of his thirty-two-year-old horse, attached 
to the old-fashioned buggy, which he prefers to any more modern vehicle. 
He has always taken an active interest in all political questions, and was at 
one time a candidate on the Nationalist ticket for the ofifice of governor of 
the state. In religious matters his influence has also been felt for good, 
and he is an ardent Methodist. The first meeting of the Salvation Army 
ever held in Pittsburgh was held by the late General Booth in the ofifice of 
Mr. Corey. 

Mr. Corey married, May 26, 1853. Elizabeth Ann, a daughter of Peter 
Kidd, who was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1795. His 
father was a native of Scotland, and died when Peter was an infant. His 
mother married (second) Houston, and he was reared by his grand- 
mother. Mr. Kidd married Ellen Wilcox, of Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania, and they lived on the farm, which he cultivated successfully. They 
had children : Alexander, Samuel, Jeremiah, Margaret Jane, Elizabeth Ann, 
twin of Margaret Jane, and wife of Mr. Corey. Mr. and Mrs. Corey have 
had children: i. Margaret Jane, who married Samuel Clarence Wymer. 
now deceased, and lives in Braddock ; she has children : Elizabeth Lucetta ; 
Mary Hester, married Charles D. Spencer, a bank cashier at Erie, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Mary Ella, married William Yost, now deceased, and lives in 
Erie county, Pennsylvania ; she has children : John, Margaret Jane, Rachel 
Elizabeth. 



658 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

James Adams, paternal grandfather of Mrs. Rachel (Adams) Corey, 
was born October 30, 1734, died October 24, 1824. In the list of the officers 
of the Cumberland county militia who were in active service in the cam- 
paign of 1776, we find in Vol. 14, Second Series of Pennsylvania Archives, 
p. 372, that James Adams appears as captain of the Fourth Company of 
the Fifth Battalion of the Cumberland County Militia. In Vol. II, p. 90, 
of "Colonial Records," we find the following minute, dated January 15, 
1777: "Captain Kickham was directed to pay Captain James Adams One 
hundred and two pounds, 5 shillings, one penny, for expenses attending 
the marching of his company from Cumberland County, Pennsylvania." 
Captain Adams married, April 26, 1755, Isabella Weldon, born September 
22, 1736, died September, 1825. Children: Joseph, born March 18, 1757, 
died November 17, 1784; Jacob, born September 23, 1758, died August 23, 
1803; William, born September 2'4, 1760, died October 26, 1805; Jonathan, 
born December 20, 1762; Jesse, born October 2, 1768, died in May, 1852; 
Lydia, twin of Jesse, died September 3, 1847; James Jr., of further men- 
tion; John, born September 23, 1772; Isaac, born November 12, 1774, died 
February 15, 1783; Weldon, born November 12, 1776; Eli, born May 28, 
1780; Levi, born February 18, 1782, died October 27, 1784. 

James Adams, son of James and' Isabella (Weldon) Adams, was born 
October 30, 1770, died August 8, 185 1. He migrated to Cumberland coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, where he made his home in the town of Franklin. One 
of his grandsons, Hon. Christopher Heydrick, became chief justice of the 
state of Pennsylvania. James Adams married Rachel Black, born in 1775, 
died at Franklin, in September, 1886, at the unusually advanced age of one 
hundred and eleven years. They had children : James, Elizabeth, Isabella, 
Henry Bowman, Mary, Jane, Matilda, Rachel, married Alfred Corey (see 
Corey VIII); Lydia, married Moses Corey, as above mentioned; Jessie, 
Samuel, Josiah. 



The families Blose, Patterson and Borland have long been con- 
BLOSE nected with the history of Western Pennsylvania, in connection 

with the counties of Westmoreland and Allegheny. Dr. Dan- 
iel Patterson Blose, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, a modern representative 
of these families through his mother, Sarah Mertilla (Patterson) Blose, 
traces to the Revolutionary soldier, John Ward, an ensign and an original 
member of the Society of the Cincinnati. His sister, Hannah Ward, mar- 
ried John Gray, and was the mother of Rachel Borland (Gray) Patterson, 
wife of John Alexander Patterson, maternal grandfather of Dr. Daniel 
Patterson Blose. 

This line of maternal descent traces to Alexander Patterson, a soldier 
of the Sixty-third Regiment of Foot in the British army, he of Scotch an- 
cestry. Alexander Patterson early emigrated to America, where one of his 
descendants, William Patterson, became an early settler of Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, later locating in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 659 

where Dravosburg now stands. Tliere William Patterson took up land, huilt 
a log cabin, resided several years, and married Margaret Whigham, born 
on shipboard in New York harbor. William and his wife Margaret later 
moved to McKeesport, where both ended their days. She is buried in Ver- 
sailles Cemetery, but his burial place is unknown. Among the children of 
William and Margaret ( Whigham j Patterson was a son, John Alexander 
Patterson, born on the farm, now Dravosburg, and there spent his early 
manhood. He married (first) Sarah Crawford, who bore him five children. 
He married (second) in 1845, Pa^chcl Borland Cray, widow of William 
Whigham. She was born about where Christy Park now stands, on what 
was later called the Penney homestead. There she lived and married her 
first husband, who died three months after his marriage. Five years later 
she married John Alexander Patterson, then a widower with five children. 
Shortly after their marriage they moved to a farm in Armstrong county, 
but two years later located in Port Perry (now Bessemer), where Mr. 
Patterson engaged in the coal business. Later he moved to a farm of two 
hundred and forty-seven acres, on which Duquesne now stands. The house 
in which he lived stood near the river and near where the present Edward 
Crawford house stands. After four years on that farm he moved to Mc- 
Keesport, where he became proprietor of the Hiawatha, then the onl}' hotel 
in the town. Later he retired to his boyhood home, Dravosburg, where he 
died. Botii he and his wife rest in Versailles Cemetery, and both were 
members of the Presbyterian church. Children of John Alexander and 
Rachel Borland (Gray) Patterson: Sarah Mertilla, born in 1846, in Arm- 
strong county, Pennsylvania, married Israel Rody Blose, of further men- 
tion ; Hannah, married William Moore, and died in McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania ; James Findley, a clerk, died in McKeesport ; Harry, living in 
Cleveland, Ohio, at the time of his death, August 21, 1914. 

The paternal descent of Dr. Daniel Patterson Blose, of McKeesport, 
is from the Blose family of W^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania. His 
grandparents. Daniel and Elizabeth (Rowe) Blose, were born near Delmont 
in that county, where Daniel Blose was for many years a miller and a well- 
known prominent figure. He acquired a competence and lived retired at 
Delmont during his later years, both he and his wife dying there. Two of 
his thirteen children died young. The others were: Israel Rody, of fur- 
ther mention ; Mary, married Robert Reed, and lives in Pittsburgh : Amos, 
a millwright, living in Greensburg, Pennsylvania ; Diana, resides at Salem- 
ville, Pennsylvania, unmarried ; Benjamin, a real estate dealer, living in 
Greensburg; Jeremiah, died in Delmont, a merchant; William, died in Del- 
mont, an undertaker; George, a jeweler, now living in Los Angeles. Cali- 
fornia; Jennie, married lioward ^^'addell, and lives in Delmont; Hettie, 
died in girlhood ; Caroline, married John Potts, and lives in Salemville. 

Israel Rody Blose, eldest son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Rowe) Blose, 
was born in Delmont, \\'estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1S43. died in 
McKeesport, -May 18, 1880. He spent his youth in Delmont and there 



66o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

learned the trade of millwright, his father being a prominent miller of that 
section, no doubt influencing his selection of that trade, which then was a 
most profitable one. He traveled a great deal in pursuit of his trade, met 
his later wife in McKeesport, married and there settled. He continued 
intendent of machinery in the W. D. Wood steel mill, holding that position 
working at his trade for several years after marriage, then became super- 
until his death in 1880. He was a man of high standing, a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and of the Masonic Order, his wife also a Presby- 
terian. In politics he was a Democrat. 

Israel Rody Blose married Sarah Mertilla Patterson, born in March, 
1846, in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John Alexander and 
Rachel Borland (Gray) Patterson, of previous mention. Children: Joseph 
Clifford, a druggist, died a young man, August 23, 191 1; Rachel, married 
George Stone, whom she survives, a resident of McKeesport; Helen Jo- 
sephine, married Walter Albert, and resides in North Caldwell, New Jer- 
sey; Daniel Patterson, of whom further. Mrs. Blose remained a widow 
until September 29, 1887, on which date she married Samuel Carothers, 
who died in 1896. Their only child died in infancy. She is now a resident 
of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Daniel Patterson Blose, youngest son of Israel Rody and Sarah 
Mertilla (Patterson) Blose, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 7, 1878. After public school courses, terminating in graduation from 
McKeesport High School, he entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated M.D., June 13, 1900. He 
spent the following year as interne at McKeesport Hospital, then went 
abroad, spending a year in study at Vienna and the Rotunda Maternity 
Hospital in Dublin. He then returned to McKeesport, and began private 
general practice in medicine and surgery. He has earned honorable distinc- 
tion in his native city, and is professionally known far beyond local con- 
fines. He is surgeon for the American Sheet and Tin Plate Company, and 
for the Sterling Steel Company, of McKeesport, also is in charge of State 
Tuberculosis Dispensary No. 8r, located in that city. He is a member of 
the Allegheny County Medical Society, and belongs to the Masonic Order. 
In political faith he is a Republican, and in religious belief a Presbyterian. 
In college he was a member of Skull and Dagger, and Alpha and Omega 
fraternities. Perhaps no harder test can be imposed upon the young phy- 
sician than to begin practice in his native town. Dr. Blose has successfully 
withstood the test of character and popularity, and counts among his best 
friends those who are also his oldest friends. 



This family, according to Irish history, dates back to the tenth 
LOGUE century, and the names of Logue and Logan are anglicized 

forms of Lochan, son of Daimhin, king of Argille, and from 
whom the families are descended. In the eighteenth century, during the 
reign of King Louis the Sixteenth, the ancestor of the Loguc family was 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 66i 

in France, and his loyally lo the king led to the confiscation of hi-, property, 
and he iled to Scotland, and thence to Ireland. 

(1) William Logue was born in CJlarion county, I'ennsylvania, of Irish 
parents. After his marriage he settled on a farm at St. Petersburg, and 
there his death occurred. lie was the owner of about three hundred acres 
of land, a part of which he cleared. He and his wife were member, of the 
Methodist Episco])al Church. He married Catherine Elder, and they had 
children: John, an oil operator, died in St. Petersburg; James, also an oil 
operator, died in McDonald, Pennsylvania ; William, of further mention ; 
Miles, lives near West Union, West Virginia ; Eli, a farmer, died in Clarion 
county, Pennsylvania; Reuben, a mining operator, lives in Colorado; Sarah, 
married Rev. P. J. Slattery, and died in West Freedom, Clarion county, 
Penn.sylvania ; Mary, married Peter i'ainter, and died in Callensburg, Clar- 
ion county, Penn.sylvania ; Ellen, married Robert Logue, and died in Ea-ton, 
Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 

(H) William (2) Logue, son of WilHam (i) and Catherine (Eldcrj 
Logue, was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, about 1836, died in 1865. 
After his marriage he settled near Callensburg, and there established him- 
self in the lumber business, with which he was identified for some time. 
Subsequently he became interested in oil operations, and was engaged in 
this field of industry at the time of his death. He married Catherine Stover, 
also born in Clarion county about 1836, who married (second) John Cope, 
is again a widow, and resides at Callensburg. She is a daughter of Samuel 
and Lizzie Stover, both born near Centerville, Venango county, Pennsyl- 
vania. After their marriage they removed to Clarion county, where he was 
engaged in the lumber business many years. They were members of the 
Methodist church at Callensburg, where the deaths of both occurred. They 
had children: Cornelius G. W., a retired lumberman, living at Callensburg; 
John, a carpenter, living at Callensburg; Thomas, a lumberman, who died 
at Callensburg in 1876; David, an oil operator, died at Callensburg: Susan, 
widow of John Neely, lives at Callensburg; Catherine, who married Mr. 
Logue; Isabel, widow of Obadiah Fox, lives at Easton, Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania ; Mary, married Henry Heater, lives in Callensburg : Ann, 
married Hovey Shaup, and died in Parker, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Logue have had children : William Brady, of further mention ; John M.. 
proprietor of a garage, lives in Belle \^ernon, Pennsylvania; Alvin, an oil 
well driller, resides in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania ; Sheridan, died unmarried 
in Callensburg at the age of thirty years. 

(Ill) William Brady Logue, son of William (2) and Catherine 
(Stover) Logue, was born at Callensburg, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, 
November 13, 1861. The public schools of his natiye town furnished him 
with ample educational advantages, and he followed farming until he had 
attained maturity. He then became a tool dresser and driller in the oil 
fields, and in 1889 commenced contracting to drill wells, and has been ex- 
tensively engaged in this branch of industry since that time in Fa3ette, 



662 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Washington and Allegheny counties, Pennsylvania. In all he has drilled 
approximately about two hundred wells. He was one of the organizers, and 
vice-president, of the Belle Vernon Water Company. In 189 1 he removed 
to McKeesport, where he built his fine residence at No. 2807 Fifth avenue. 
Politically he is a Republican, and he is a member of Aliquippa Lodge, No. 
375, Free and Accepted Masons. Mr. Logue married, September 10, 1891, 
Delia, born in McKeesport, a daughter of the late Enoch Mains, and a 
granddaughter of Watson and Elizabeth (Small) Mains. They have no 
children. 

W^atson Mains was one of the early settlers of McKeesport, where he 
was a butcher, and assisted materially in increasing the welfare and pros- 
perity of the town. He married Elizabeth Small and both died in McKees- 
port. Enoch, son of Watson and Elizabeth (Small) Mains, enlisted in the 
Union army at the age of eighteen years, and he and three brothers served 
eighteen months. After the war he married and settled in McKeesport, 
where he established himself in the butcher business, but was obliged to 
abandon this by reason of ill health. He then conducted a grocery store 
there for about ten years, and died there in 1900. He married Irene, who 
died in March, 1887, a daughter of Lewis and Catherine (Cavin) Soles, 
also early settlers of McKeesport, where he was a carpenter and built the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church, which has been remodeled and is still 
standing. They had children : Minnie, who died in infancy ; Delia, who 
married Mr. Logue; Laura, married J. W. Morgan, and died in Ceredo, 
West Virginia ; Sadie B., married William Cadman, and lives in Kansas ; 
Edward, in the employ of the Westinghouse Company, lives in Bryn Mawr, 
a suburb of McKeesport ; Frank, a bookkeeper, lives in New Kensington, 
Pennsylvania; Mabel, unmarried, lives with Mr. Logue. 



The German name of Gross, meaning large, great, important, 
GROSS would indicate that at the time of the adoption of surnames in 

Germany, many members of this family were in the possession 
of large estates, or held important positions under the government, or had 
been prominent in some other direction. Those of the family who have 
made their homes in this country have invariably been an honor and benefit 
to the various communities in which they have resided. 

(I) Peter Gross was born in Metz, the capital of the Province of 
Lorraine, at that time belonging to France, but since the Franco-Prussian 
war of 1870-71, a German possession. He emigrated to America before the 
advent of steamships, his voyage to this country taking three months. He 
settled in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was 
employed as a coal miner many years, and finally made his home in McKees- 
port, where his death occurred. He and his wife were members of St. 
Peter's Catholic Church. Children : Jacob, Margaret, Ann, John, of further 
mention; Stephen, Peter, Mary, Michael, Gertrude, Matthew, Barbara, and 
two others. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANI/\ 663 

(II) John Gross, son of Peter Gross, was born in Mifflin township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and later removed to McKeesport, where 
he worked for a time as a coal miner. In 1883 he became the proprietor 
of a hotel on Fifth avenue, which he conducted successfully about twenty 
years, then engaged in the grocery business, but soon retired from this. He 
is a Democrat politically, and a member of St. Mary's Church. He married 
Barbara Newmeyer, born in Germany, brought to this country in early child- 
hood, died in 1905. They had children: John, William and Elizabeth, died 
in infancy; Catherine, married John H. Wertenbach, and lives in McKees- 
port; Michael John, of further mention; Margaret, married Fred D. Harris, 
and lives in McKeesport; Edith, married Stephen Johnson, and lives in 
Pittsburgh; Winifred, married W. F. Shibler, and lives in Glenwood; 
Stella, died in infancy; James, a druggist, lives at Glenwood. Mrs. Gross 
was a daughter of Peter and Margaret Newmeyer, both natives of Alsace- 
Lorraine, having been born about eight miles from Frankfort. They came 
to America at an early date, and settled at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where 
they worked in the oil fields in the vicinity of Oil City. They then conducted 
a hotel at Allegheny for some years, after which they engaged in farming, 
in the southern part of Allegheny county, and both are buried in Mifflin 
township. Mr. Newmeyer served in the German army prior to coming 
to America. Children : Margaret ; Barbara, who married Mr. Gross ; Ann ; 
Peter ; William ; and four others. 

(III) Michael John Gross, son of John and Barbara (Newmeyer) 
Gross, was born near what was at that time Bull Run, Mifflin township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1873. His preparatory edu- 
cation was acquired in the public schools of McKeesport, and he then 
matriculated at the Pittsburgh College of Pharmacy, from which he was 
graduated March 29, 1894. For a period of two years he was in the employ 
of the National Tube Works, then became a clerk in White's Pharmacy, and 
so efificient and valuable were his services that he was made manager of 
this business, and in 1904 purchased the business, and has been the sole 
proprietor since that time. It is the oldest pharmacy in the town. Polit- 
ically he gives his staunch support to the Democratic party, and he is a 
member of St. Mary's Catholic Church. Mr. Gross married, August 28, 
1901, Priscilla Atta, born in Zollarsville, Pennsylvania, yovmgest of the 
ten children of Demos Home. They have no children. 



This record begins in Ohio, where William Smith was born and 
SMITH passed his entire life. His occupation was that of farmer and 

by assiduous and industrious application to the cultivation of 
his land he became possessed of a comfortable competence, although in 
later life unfavorable fortune deprived him of the greater part of his life's 
earnings, his death occurring when he had attained a good old age. He 
was twice married, his second wife being a Miss Casner. Children of first 
marriage of William Smith: i. Samuel, enlisted in the United States army 
at the time of the Mexican War, went to the front and then all trace of him 



664 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

was lost. 2. William. 3. John, at one time a farmer of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. 4. A daughter, married John McGlumphy, and lived in Holli- 
days Cove, West Mrginia. 5. David, of whom further. There were several 
children by the second marriage of William Smith, one of them George. 

(II) David Smith, youngest child of the first wife of William Smith, 
was born in Ohio in 1827, died in Donegal township, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1883. He was reared in his native state, his opportunities 
for graded school instruction being very few, and when he was twelve years 
of age, his domestic relations becoming strained, due to his father's second 
marriage, he left home. He was for several years employed by the farmers 
of the locality, and when about twenty-one years of age came to Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania. Until the time of the Civil War he was the 
driver of a stage-coach between Pittsburgh and Bethany, frequently driving 
a four-horse team, and was the carrier of the mail between those points. 
Although at that late date the real dangers to those of his calling lurked in 
the lonely trails to the west, on one occasion he was held up by three bandits 
and was robbed of three months' pay, although at the time, fortunately, 
there was nothing else of value in the coach. He abandoned this occupation 
to enlist in Company H, Forty-sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, serving as a member of that company until the close of the Civil 
War and participating in all of its engagements. After returning from the 
front he rented farms in Washington county, and cultivated these until his 
death, which occurred when he was fifty-six years of age. He and his wife 
were members of the United Brethren Church, both regular and devoted 
attendants, and in the organization of this body he held the position of 
ruling deacon. His political faith was Democratic, that party receiving his 
undivided support at the polls. He married Hannah Snodgrass, born at 
Dutch Fork, Donegal township, Washington county, Pennsylvania, May 
27, 1830, died in 1886, daughter of John and Rebecca (Glover) Snodgrass, 
her father a native of Washington county, where his parents had settled 
after their emigration from the north of Ireland. The family were Cove- 
nanters in religion. John Snodgrass was a farmer in Donegal township, 
Washington county, dying about 1864, his land now owned by John Holmes, 
a grandson. Rebecca (Glover) Snodgrass was of Scotch descent, her an- 
cestors settling in Washington county after their emigration from Scotland, 
and was born on Buck Run, near Atchison, Donegal township, Washington 
county, Pennsylvania. Children of John and Rebecca (Glover) Snodgrass: 
I. William, lived in Wheeling, West Virginia. 2. Samuel, a farmer, lived 
in Donegal township, Washington county, Pennsylvania. 3. Elizabeth, 
married George Holmes, and lived on a farm in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Margaret, married Ralph Ralston, and resides in Donegal town- 
ship, Washington county, Pennsylvania. 5. Jackson. 6. Hannah, of previ- 
ous mention, married David Smith. 7. Mary, married Michael Essick, and 
lives in Prole, Iowa. 8. Washington, a farmer, lived at Cross Creek, Penn- 
sylvania. Children of David and Hannah (Snodgrass) Smith: i. John, 
deceased ; was a physician, lived at South Solon, Ohio ; married Hannah 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 665 

Connett. 2. William, a retired plasterer; married Elizabeth Cunningham; 
lives in lUirnsville, J'ennsylvania. 3. George \V., a hardware merchant; re- 
sides with his wife Clara at ilarvey, Creene county, Pennsylvania. 4. James 
Albert, of whom further. 5. David J., a physician of Osceola, Nebraska; 
married Rose . 

(Ill) James Albert Smith, son of David and Hannah (Snodgrass) 
Smith, was born in Independence, Washington county, Pennsylvania, May 
9, i860. In boyhood he attended the district schools near Washington, Penn- 
sylvania, Claysville, and the Zion Hill School in Buffalo township. When 
he was seventeen years of age he began his career as a school teacher, a 
calling in which he continued for seventeen years, all of which time, with 
the exception of three terms in Missouri, was spent in his native county. 
Besides being an instructor in several normal schools he was at different 
times principal of the schools at McDonald, Bridgeville, Noblestown and 
Burnsville. After his retirement from the pedagogical profession he pur- 
chased a fully equipped printing office and began the publication of a news- 
paper at McDonald, Pennsylvania, the journal named the McDonald Tele- 
phone, and was its editor from 1894 until 1897, disposing of the paper in 
the latter year to Frank Smith. He was then employed as bill clerk for 
Rineck-Wilson, on Wood street. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, subsequently be- 
ing promoted to the position of head bookkeeper of the purchasing depart- 
ment, remaining with that firm until 1906. In 1907 he moved to Ingram, 
Pennsylvania, building a house at No. 29 Union street, and since that year 
has been engaged in real estate dealing in that place. Numerous important 
transactions in property in and around Ingram have been conducted through 
his office, and he cares for the requirements of a business of generous 
dimensions. He is a member of the National Union, politically is a Demo- 
crat, and with his wife belongs to the Presbyterian Church of Ingram, which 
he serves as elder. 

Mr. Smith married (first) in August, 1884, Ida Fleming, born at 
Burgettstown, Washington county, Pennsylvania, died in March, 1887, 
daughter of Isaac Fleming, a merchant; married (second) in October, 1892, 
Virginia Pinkerton, born at Midway, Washington county. Pennsylvania, 
daughter of Hunter and Sarah Pinkerton, both deceased, her father a 
farmer. Child of James Albert and Ida (Fleming) Smith: Albert Flem- 
ing, born May 5, 1885, lives at home. Children of James Albert and Vir- 
ginia (Pinkerton) Smith: i. Genevieve, born March 24, 1895. 2. Roland, 
born February 4, 1900. 3. Lucile, born July 8, 1901. 4. James, born August 
II, 1908. 



Overcoming the handicap of strange tongue, people and 

FRIEDMAN surroundings, learning English in the night schools and 

working days. Henry Friedman, banker, of McKeesport. 

has achieved an enviable success and has won high standing in the financial 

world. 

Henry Friedman was born in Hungary, Europe, in 1870, son of Bernard 



666 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Friedman, of a family long seated in that country. He obtained an excel- 
lent education in his native city, acquiring a fluent knowledge of five lan- 
guages, but not of English. At age of eighteen years he came to the United 
States, spending four years in New York City. He acquired the English 
language in the city night schools, and after becoming well versed in its 
pronunciation and grammar he obtained a position in the foreign banking 
house of M. Rosett. His mastery of foreign languages there rendered his 
services most valuable and for several years he remained in M. Rosett's 
employ in a confidential capacity. He then spent seven years in a similar 
position with M. Rosenbaum, a foreign banker of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, remaining in that city until the year 1900. Shortly after his mar- 
riage, January 16, 1900, he was admitted a partner in the foreign banking 
house, Joseph Roth & Sons, 422 Locust street, McKeesport. 

Mr. Friedman has developed strong ability as a financier, has gained 
a wide experience in the different cities and has added strength to the bank- 
ing houses with which he is connected. In addition to his connection with 
Joseph Roth & Sons, he has acquired other important interests. He is a 
director of Roth's State Bank, bankers of Pittsburgh; director of the First 
National Bank of Sutersville ; director of Realty Company of McKeesport, 
and director of the Home for the Aged, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a 
member of several lodges, societies, fraternal, social and religious, including 
the "Gemulas Chesad," and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Friedman married, January 16, 1900, Anna, daughter of Joseph 
Roth, of McKeesport. Children: Bernard A., Molly S., Joseph T., Estelle. 



The family of Inskeep, well and favorably known in the 
INSKEEP vicinity of McKeesport, where it has been seated for almost 

half a century, is one noted for honesty of purpose, strict 
application to business pursuits, perseverance in the performance of duties 
and a high sense of their obligations as American citizens. 

(I) John Inskeep, grandfather of Alonzo Inskeep, was a native of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was reared and educated, and after 
his marriage to Miss Myers, also a native of Philadelphia, removed to St. 
Clairsville, Ohio, being among the early settlers of that place. He was a 
merchant in St. Clairsville for forty years, at the expiration of which time he 
purchased a farm, which he operated and on which he resided, located in 
Summit county, Ohio, and their deaths occurred there, he having attained 
the venerable age of ninety years, his wife passing away at the age of seventy 
years. 

(II) James F. Inskeep, son of John Inskeep, was born in St. Clairs- 
ville, Belmont county, Ohio, 1813, died at Cuyahoga Falls, Summit county, 
Ohio, 1856. He received an excellent education, later studying for the law, 
but his principal occupation was farming, a pursuit in which he took a 
great interest. He spent about two years in the state of Iowa, after which 
he returned to Summit county, Ohio, and subsequently became a manu- 
facturer of agricultural implements. He was a member of the Episcopal 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 667 

Church, his family, which originally came from Staffordshire, England, be- 
ing Quakers in religious belief. He was a Whig in politics. He mar- 
ried Lydia A. Wilkins, born in St. Clairsville, Ohio, 1813, died 1896, aged 

eighty-three years, daughter of James and (Boggs) Wilkins, both 

natives of Pennsylvania, the former named having been a relative of Judy 
W. Wilkins, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins were 
among tlie early settlers of St. Clairsville, Ohio, and there they spent the 
remainder of their days. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Inskeep: Edgar; 
James, deceased; Albert; Alonzo, of whom further; Ada, who became the 
wife of William Holmes, of Twin Falls, Idaho; Lydia Wilkins, deceased, 
who married a Mr. Bemis. 

(HI) Alonzo Inskeep, son of James F. Inskeep, was born at St. Clairs- 
ville, Belmont county, Ohio, April 21, 1837. He was reared in Summit 
county, Ohio, whither his parents removed, and attended the common schools 
of tlie neighborhood, obtaining a practical education. He served an appren- 
ticeship at the trade of machinist, becoming an expert in that line. In the 
year 1857 he removed to the state of Pennsylvania, locating in Pittsburgh, 
and there worked at his trade for a number of years. In 1861, upon the 
outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in Company H, Seventh Ohio In- 
fantry, and served for seventeen months, participating in a number of 
battles, being wounded at the battle of Cedar Mountain, losing his right 
arm, which incapacitated him for further engaging in his trade of ma- 
chinist. After his term of enlistment expired, he returned to Pittsburgh, 
but shortly afterward removed to Monongahela City, Pennsylvania, and 
there engaged as a manufacturer of lumber, continuing his operations from 
1864 to 1870, when he removed to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he 
followed the same line of work for over thirty years, being principally en- 
gaged in the building of boats and barges. In 1886 he was one of the 
organizers of the McKeesport and Youghiogheny Ice Company, was chosen 
its president, in which capacity he served for a number of years, and at 
the present time (1914) is secretary, manager and treasurer. He was also 
one of the organizers of the McKeesport Title & Trust Company, and is 
now serving as one of its directors. The holding of these ofifices testifies 
to his capability and efficiency, and demonstrates clearly the esteem in which 
he is held by his business associates. Since attaining his majority he has 
cast his vote for the candidates of the Republican party, voting for Abraham 
Lincoln in i860, and he has been active in its ranks, serving as councilman 
for seven years, burgess for three years, water commissioner for ten years 
and justice of the peace for five years. He is a member of the Episcopal 
Church, and of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Inskeep married, August 6, 1866, Anna A. Harvey, of Monon- 
gahela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Caleb and Re- 
becca Harvey, early settlers of that cit)'. Children : Caleb H., a shipping 
clerk for the McKeesport & Youghiogheny Ice Company; Rea, wife of 
Lewis E. Lannan, of Mt. Vernon, New York; Anna A., wife of August 
Ziegler, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania; Lyde, wife of George B. Morrow, 



668 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lydia, wife of J. N. Kinney, of Brooklyn, 
New York. 



The origin of this name cannot be accurately determined. It 
DREW is to be met with in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland, and 

appears in the early records of New England. The Drew 
(Drewe) family of England, of which the Irish family is probably an off- 
spring, descends from an early noble Norman, and the line can be traced 
through centuries. According to a preamble to the Drew pedigree, given by 
the King of Arms: "The ancient and knightly family of Drew of Devon- 
shire are lineal descendants from Richard, Duke of Normandy, grandfather 
of William the Conqueror." 

Francis Drew was born in Ireland, and came to this country in the 
summer of 1841 with his wife and one child ; they had two children but left 
one with his grandparents in Ireland. They landed at New York City, but 
at once went on to Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, where he found a position as a 
wagon builder at the furnace. Later he went to Clarion and to Pittsburgh, 
working at his trade, then opened a hotel at the corner of High and Webster 
streets, then called Crow lane, which he conducted about five years. Re- 
moving to Remington, on the Steubenville pike, he opened a store and hotel, 
which he managed personally from 1853 to 1858, when he had business 
reverses and was a heavy financial loser, being obliged to give up the hotel. 
He then returned to his work as a carpenter, continuing until the outbreak 
of the Civil War, when he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and First 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of 
the war. Me again took up his trade for a time, then retired to the Soldiers' 
Home, in Dayton, Ohio, where he died in 1883. Mr. Drew married Bridget 
Burke, who died about 1858, and they had children: Thomas, born in Ire- 
land, was a school teacher in Kentucky, enlisted in the Home Guards at the 
outbreak of the Civil War, and died from exposure ; Michael, of further 
mention ; Francis, died in Pittsburgh when about eight years of age ; John, 
enlisted in Knapp's Battery during the Civil War, marched with Sherman 
to the sea, was wounded by a shot, later returned to McKeesport, and died 
there in 1883 ; Joseph, died at the age of eight months ; Mary, unmarried, 
lives in Pittsburgh. 

Michael Drew, son of Francis and Bridget (Burke) Drew, was born 
at Gort, about eight miles from Dublin, Ireland, March 10, 1841, and was 
a young infant when brought to this country by his parents. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and after the death of his mother in 1858, left 
his home and went tO' Ohio, and from that state to Kentucky, where he dug 
iron ore for a time, then went to Louisiana, and was in that state when the 
war broke out. He was engaged in farming at the time, but abandoned this 
work and enlisted in Company C. Fourth Battalion, Louisiana Volunteers, 
and served from August, i86t, until he was captured at Chickamauga, Sep- 
tember 19, 1863. He was held in Camp Douglas Prison, at Chicago, until 
June 15, 1865. He was an active participant in the battle of Secessionville, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA (/f) 

South Carolina ; Jackson, Mississippi ; and several others. Upon his return 
to Pittshurgh he entered the employ of a farmer by the name of Lee, at 
Woodville, receiving for his services eight dollars per month, and in the 
fall of the same year went to Carnegie and worked at Bell's Coal Plant. 
Returning to the employ of Mr. Lee, he opened a small mine for him, and 
was then employed in the Woodville Flour Mill for the next six years, being 
regularly advanced in position while there. He then became the half owner 
of a flour mill at Dridgeville and helped to conduct it until the panic of 
1873. A flood in the meantime had caused disaster of large extent to Mr. 
Drew's home, and he sold his share of the mill to William Carlyle. In 
association with two brothers by the name of Friar, he purchased a mill at 
Richmond, Ohio, conducted this four years, then sold his share and re- 
turned to Pittsburgh, where he attended courses at the Actual Business 
College. He then went to Steubenville and engaged in the grocery business 
for a time, sold this and went to Bridgeville, and then to McKeesport, where 
in association with Richard Davis, he built a flour mill near the Baltimore 
& Ohio station. Mr. Davis sold his share to a man by the name of Evans, 
but Mr. Drew continued two years, when the mill was destroyed by fire. He 
then established himself in the feed business on Fifth avenue, carried this 
on from 1888 to 1902, and has lived retired from business since that time. 
He is Republican in politics, and was formerly a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Heptasophs. 

Mr. Drew married, in November, 1892, Ada A., born in Hamburg, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of Joshua Paul, who lives in Reading, and they 
live at No. 217 Eleventh avenue. They have no children. 



The Werner family is an old one of Prussia, Germany, 
WERNER where they have for the greater part been engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. The direct ancestor of the branch under 
discussion here had two children : Frederick, who disappeared without leav- 
ing a clue; Joseph, of further mention. 

(II) Joseph Werner was born at Nordhausen, Stohlberg, Prussia. Ger- 
many. February 17, 1817. and died near Millers Grove, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, December 29, 1906. After his marriage he emigrated to the 
United States with his wife and child, settling on South Side, Pittsburgh, 
where he found employment as a coal miner for a time. He soon removed 
to McKeesport, where he was a gardener for a time, then made his home 
at Six Mile Ferry, now Hays borough, and was occupied as a miner there 
until 1865. He then purchased a farm of twelve acres in Baldwin township, 
raising general produce for which he found a ready market in Pittsburgh. 
He sold this farm in 1888, and retired to private life near Millers Grove. 
He took an active part in local political affairs in the interest of the Re- 
publican party, he and his wife were members of the Lutheran Church, and 
he was a member of Peter Fritz Lodge, No. 486, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He married, in Germany, Caroline Burkhardt, born at Dittersbach. 
Waltenburg, Schleisem, Prussia, July 18. 1824. died May 28, 191 1. She was 



670 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a sister of Antony Burkhardt, born November 2, 1832, died May 31, 191 1, 
who was the burgomaster of his native town of Dittersbach for many years, 
and was a man of considerable influence in that section of the country. Mr. 
and Mrs. Werner had children : Caroline, who married John Held and died 
in Pittsburgh; Anthony, a mine inspector living at Millers Grove; Joseph A., 
of further mention ; Annie, married Emil Nurnberger and lives at Millers 
Grove; Frederick, died at the age of seventeen years; John, is retired from 
business and lives at Millers Grove; Charles, killed in a coal mine in 1888 
at the age of twenty-four years. 

(Ill) Joseph A. Werner, son of Joseph and Caroline (Burkhardt) 
Werner, was born in what is now Hays borough, Pennsylvania, January 4, 
1852. The public schools provided him with a sound, practical education, 
after which he commenced working in the mines, with which he was identi- 
fied for a period of thirty-two years. During this time he became one of the 
most expert miners in the state. In 1893 he took out a piece of coal six and 
one-half feet in length, tlie other dimensions being twelve by twelve inches, 
this also containing veins of limestone. This extraordinarily large specimen 
was placed in a glass case and sent to the World's Fair at Chicago, where it 
formed a part of the exhibit of the Pittsburgh Coal Company, but a diploma 
for it was awarded to Mr. Werner. During the last twenty-one years of his 
life as a miner, and for four years thereafter, Mr. Werner had also con- 
ducted a general grocery store at No. 2524 Brownsville road, in the borough 
of Carrick, this being disposed of in March, 1904. He also held the office of 
postmaster during the last seventeen years. In 1904 he was appointed jus- 
tice of the peace, and at that time established himself in the real estate busi- 
ness combined with insurance interests in which he has been engaged since 
that time. His term as justice of the peace expired in 1910. He has always 
been a staunch supporter of the Republican party and active in local political 
affairs. He served as school director in Baldwin township, 1887-90, this 
being prior to the time when a part of it became Carrick borough. He and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a member of 
Monongahela Lodge, No. 269, Free and Accepted Masons ; Abraham Lin- 
coln Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, joining this in 1873; and 
Smoky City Council, Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

Mr. Werner married, July 30, 1874, Sarah A. Butler, a native of Mis- 
souri. She is a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Saddler) Butler, both 
born in England, settled in Missouri for a time, then removed to Pittsburgh, 
where they died. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Werner: Lillian, married F. H. 
Locke, and lives with her parents ; Thomas B., a hotel keeper on South 
Side; Harry S., a conductor on the railroad; Morrell Jacob, also a rail- 
road conductor; James G., a plumber; Benjamin Harrison, automobile agent; 
Joseph Mc, a plumber. 



The Bullion family in the United States is a comparatively 

BULLION new one, although in the sixty-five years of its residence in 

the state of Pennsylvania its members have branched out 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 671 

into widely separated lines of endeavor anr! are represented in many fields, 
industrial, mercantile, musical and ecclesiastical, John J. Bullion, with whom 
this record deals, belonging to the priesthood of the Roman Catholic Church. 

He is a son of John and Catherine (Ruttiger) Bullion, natives of Ba- 
varia, Germany, both of whom came unmarried to the United States about 
1850, settling in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where they were mar- 
ried. John Bullion became employed in the old iron and steel mill operated 
by Spang, Chalfant & Company, at Etna, and with the exception of a few 
years spent on a farm on the Youghiogheny river this was his occupation 
throughout his active life. Politically he was a Democrat. He died in 
1895, aged seventy-two years, his wife dying in 1905, aged seventy-four 
years. Children of John and Catherine (Ruttiger) Bullion: i. Agnes, un- 
married, lives with her brother. Rev. John J. Bullion. 2. John J., of whom 
further. 3. Mary, died unmarried. 4. Michael, a resident of Etna, Penn- 
sylvania, heater in an iron mill at that place. 5. Joseph, organist of St. Mary 
Magdalene's Roman Catholic Church, in Homestead, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Charles, a merchant, resides in Sharpsburg. Pennsylvania. 7. Philomena, 
married Joseph Jacobs, and lives in Etna, Pennsylvania. 8. Annie, died 
aged ten years. 

Rev. John J. Bullion, son of John and Catherine (Ruttiger) Bullion, 
was born in Sharpsburg, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April i, 1856. 
After completing his studies in the parochial schools he was for eight years 
a student in the St. Michael Seminary, then entered Grand Seminary, at 
Montreal, Canada, whence he was graduated. His first charge after his 
ordination was as pastor of the church at Dudley, Huntingdon, Canada, 
after which he became assistant to the late Bishop Richard Phelan, finally 
being assigned to the pastorate of St. Peter's in Allegheny City (Pittsburgh 
North Side), Pennsylvania. In February, 1881, he was appointed to his 
present position by the late Bishop Tuigg, that of rector of St. Mary Mag- 
dalene's Roman Catholic Church, in Homestead, Pennsylvania. Strictly 
speaking, Rev. Bullion was appointed, not to the church, but to the field, 
for the Catholic families of that locality, about forty in number, had no 
church organization nor any house of worship. For a short time after his 
arrival Rev. Bullion conducted services according to the Catholic ritual in 
a hall at Homestead, soon rallying his people to the erection of a small frame 
church on Tenth street. From this time to the present, induced by tlie rapid 
development of Homestead, the growth in strength and prosperity of the 
church has been steady and vigorous, about eight j^ears after the building 
of the church edifice a parochial school being reared opposite. In 1S90 this 
was totally destroyed by fire ; it was a combination church and school, 
the first church built having been too small, then the original church was 
enlarged to accommodate the religious services until tlie new church was 
built. The new school, in use at the present time, built of brick, was filled 
to capacity by the eight hundred children enrolled therein. IMore recently 
a convent has been added to the group of buildings, sheltering twenty' sisters 
of charity who have charge of the schools. The first cliurch built, the con- 



672 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

gregation having long ago outgrown its humble size, now serves for the 
children's instruction, etc., and in 1895, on a corner lot adjoining the old 
property, at Tenth avenue and Amity street, was built a handsome two-spired 
buff brick church, facing the east and overlooking a beautiful municipal 
park, the gift to Homestead of H. C. Frick. The latest addition to the 
church property is the parsonage, a building matching the church in material, 
its outlook upon the attractive park previously mentioned. 

The improvements and growth above enumerated show that from a 
material point of view the ministry of Rev. Bullion has been a decided suc- 
cess. But the true value of his work to Homestead, the greatest good that 
he has accomplished, cannot be set down in terms of dollars or cents, nor in 
buildings erected, nor in organizations perfected. It lies in the benefit and 
inspiration that have been derived by the people of his parish from the 
loving and earnest intercourse he has had with them and in the manner in 
which they have been quickened to nobler lives by the influence of his 
example. Rev. Bullion is a member of the Catholic Mutual Beneficial 
Association. 



The name of Volz is one of frequent occurrence in Germany, and 
VOLZ it has invariably been recorded as the name of an honorable 
and esteemed citizen. Many of the name have come to this 
country, and have proved their worth as citizens in the United States. 

Daniel Volz, born in Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany, about 1819, died in 
1859, his entire life being spent in his native land. During all the business 
years of his life he held a position as clerk in the government post office in 
Darmstadt. He and his wife were members of the Evangelical Church. 
He married Katherine Bower, born near the town of Odenwald, Hessen, 
Germany, in 1814, died in 1890. The Emperor of Germany has a summer 
home near her birthplace. After the death of her husband she came to the 
United States, where she lived in Pittsburgh among her children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Volz had children : Jacob, who was a steel portrait engraver, died in 
Germany; John Henry, a lithographer, died in Pittsburgh; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Philip Kramer, a business man of Pittsburgh, both now deceased ; 
Louis, of further mention ; Mary, married George Kramer, a brother of 
Philip, and was for many years proprietor of the Atlantic Garden, in Pitts- 
burgh, the business now being carried on by his widow and sons. 

Louis Volz, son of Daniel and Katherine (Bower) Volz, was born in 
the town of Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany, March 17, 1848. He received an 
excellent education at the public schools in his native country, also attending 
the Gymnasium, an institution which corresponds to the high schools of the 
United States. He was then apprenticed to learn the printer's trade, and 
upon the completion of his apprenticeship, served three years in the Ger- 
man army. The first two years were spent in a garrison, the third in action 
during the Franco-Prussian war, 1870-71. He escaped without being wound- 
ed, but was an active participant in many engagements, among them being 
the fierce and bloody battle of Gravelotte, and helped take the city street by 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 673 

street. His term of service in the army expired in 1872, and shortly after- 
ward he emigrated to America with his young wife. He at once went to 
Pittsburgh, where his elder brothers were already living. He had no diffi- 
culty in securing a position, this being as a printer under C. F. Bauer, who 
edited and was proprietor of a German paper. In 1874 he gave up his posi- 
tion with Mr. Bauer in order to establish himself in the printing business. 
He commenced on a small scale, renting a large room from Otto Krebs, 
who had a lithographing establishment, then removed to Smithfield street, 
and finally to Grant street, where he was located many years and built up a 
business of huge proportions, and gradually monopolized all the German 
printing to be done in the city of Pittsburgh. In 1903 he sold this estab- 
lishment as his numerous other interests claimed all of his time and atten- 
tion. In 1892 Mr. Volz, in association with several other influential Ger- 
mans, founded the German Beneficial Union, a lodge and insurance order 
especially designed for German-Americans. This organization has developed 
into the largest lodge and insurance order of its kind in the United States; 
it has more tlian twenty-two thousand members; Mr. Volz has been presi- 
dent of the order since its inception. The home of this order was located 
on Carson street. South Side, Pittsburgh, in 1908, and they are still in that 
location. Mr. Volz is possessed of an unusual amount of executive ability, 
and it is largely due to his individual efforts and direction that the success of 
the association was attained. He has never aspired to public office, although 
there is no doubt that if he would allow his name to be used as a candidate, 
election would be assured. He and his family are members of the Smith- 
field Avenue German Evangelical Church, and they reside at No. 216 
Stamm avenue, in Mount Oliver borough. He is a director in the Hill Top 
Savings & Trust Company; a member of the Frohsinn Society, the oldest 
German Society in Pittsburgh ; and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Mr. \"oIz married, April 12, 1872, in Germany, Anna, born in Darm- 
stadt, a daughter of John Young, who was a printer in his native land, Ger- 
many, which he never left. Mr. and Mrs. Volz have had children: Eliza- 
beth, married John Blocher, and lives at Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania ; 
Louis Jr., who holds a position in the executive office of the German Bene- 
ficial L^nion, married Stella Lantz ; Henry, in the auditor's office of the 
Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Company, is unmarried ; George, in the 
treasurer's office of the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad Company, is also 
unmarried. 



Frederick H. Ahlborn, the genial and popular proprietor 

AHLBORN of the Hotel Carrick, the leading hostelry of the borough 

of Carrick, in the organization of which Mr. Ahlborn was 

a prominent factor, is a native of Baldwin township, Allegheny county, 

Pennsylvania, now part of Carrick, born January 8, 1875, ^ descendant on 

both the paternal and maternal sides of a German ancestry. 

August Ahlborn, father of Frederick H. Ahlborn, was born in the 



674 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

town of Ghetting, kingdom of Hanover, Germany, January 9, 1845, ^^^'^ 
April 12, 1903. He was the youngest of seven sons and according to the 
custom in Hanover when there were seven sons in a family, the King of 
Hanover stood godfather for the seventh, which he did in this case. The 
parents of August Ahlborn were born, lived and died in Germany, nothing 
further being known of them. August Ahlborn grew to maturity on a farm 
in his native land, attending the schools in the vicinity of his home during 
his youth, and being a great lover of horses became a coachman upon at- 
taining young manhood. Before he became of age he entered the Hanover 
army and served for three years. He participated in the war between 
Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein, and was in many hard-fought battles. 
In 1866, immediately after the close of the war, he emigrated to the United 
States and settled in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and for the first year 
worked on the farm of his brother, Frederick H. Ahlborn, who was fourteen 
years his senior, and who was the only other member of the family to come 
to this country ; his farm was located in Bethel township, and he was also 
the owner of a fruit farm in Baldwin township. At the expiration of his 
one year's service with his brother, August Ahlborn became an employee in 
Elliot's Nursery, and served there for seven years. He then entered into 
a business partnership with Herman' Mewes, they establishing a grocery 
and saloon, but this connection was dissolved three years later, and in 
June, 1873, Mr. Ahlborn purchased a hotel at what was known as Spike- 
town, now Carrick, giving it the name of the Hanover House. He con- 
ducted this hotel until May, 1899, when his son, Frederick H. Ahlborn, as- 
sumed the management of it. 

August Ahlborn married, 1869, Margaretta Rindfuss, born in Ugen- 
heim by Darmstadt, Germany, June 22, 1845, daughter of Philip and Kath- 
erina (Heldman) Rindfuss. Philip Rindfuss was born in Ugenheim by 
Darmstadt, Germany, was a shoemaker by trade, a member of the Ger- 
man Lutheran Church, and died at the early age of thirty-four years. His 
wife was born in Obermodon-Odwaldt, Germany, and after the death of her 
husband married (second) Ludwig Gerstenschleger, who died in Alle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania; he was also a shoemaker by trade. Mrs. Gersten- 
schleger died in Germany. Children of Philip and Katherina Rindfuss: 
I. Margaretta, aforementioned as the wife of August Ahlborn. 2. Bar- 
bara, married Charles Zeiler, a wagon builder; resided in the eighteenth 
ward, Pittsburgh ; both deceased. 3. Valentine, a glass worker by trade ; 
married Margaretta Kerstener; resides in the eighteenth ward, Pittsburgh. 

Children of Ludwig and Katherina Gerstenschleger: i. Ida, married 

Benedict. 2. Henry, a cigarmaker, resides in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 
3. George, deceased. 4. William, deceased. Children of August and Mar- 
garetta Ahlborn: i. George, a blacksmith, resides in Knoxville. 2. Fred- 
erick H., of whom further. 3. Emma, married Gotlieb Rail ; resides in 
Carrick, Pennsylvania. 4. Margaretta, married Peter Pistorius, engaged in 
the insurance business; resides on Phillips avenue, Carrick, Pennsylvania. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 675 

5. VVilhelmina, married David Timothy; resides in Knoxville, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Frederick H. Ahlborn attended the old Concord School in Baldwin 
township, and the German Lutheran School on Jane street, South Side, 
Pittsburgh, completing his studies at the age of fourteen years. His first 
employment was in his father's grocery, where he remained for a few years, 
and the following three years he served as conductor and motorman on the 
street railway. In May, 1899, he assumed control of his father's hotel, then 
called the Halfway House, and after the borough of Carrick was formed 
the name was changed to Hotel Carrick, its present form. The house is 
noted for cleanliness and for its excellent cuisine, and its host is always 
mindful of the comfort and wishes of his many patrons, who show their 
appreciation by continuing their visits and recommending it to their friends. 
Mr. Ahlborn was active in the organization of the local fire company, serv- 
ing as treasurer of the same for a number of years, and he has also acted 
as treasurer of the Mt. Oliver German Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 
In 1913 he erected a fine building at No. 1730 Brownsville road, equipped 
with all modern appliances. Mr. Ahlborn and his family are members of 
the German Lutheran Church, and he holds membership in Hill Top 
Lodge, No. 9, Knights of Pythias; Carrick Eyrie, No. 1520, Fraternal Order 
of Eagles ; Peter Fritz Lodge, No. 486, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Robert Blum Encampment, No. 155, of the same order. 

Mr. Ahlborn married, February 6, 1898, Catherine Roessler, born on 
South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1877, daughter of Christopher and 
Mary Roessler, natives of Pennsylvania, the former named deceased, the 
latter living at the present time (1914) at No. 1726 Brownsville road, Car- 
rick, Pennsylvania. Mr. Roessler was a glass worker by trade. !Mr. and 
Mrs. Ahlborn are the parents of one child, Frederick Emmett, born Oc- 
tober 31, 1900. 



By his own honorable exertions and moral attributes, Hu- 
BENSON bert G. Benson, a representative citizen of Carrick, has 

carved out for himself friends, affluence and position, and 
by the strength and force of his own character has overcome obstacles which 
to others less hopeful and less courageous would seem unsurmountable. 

The earliest known ancestor of the line of the Benson family herein 
recorded, was a resident of London, England, and served as Archbishop in 
the Episcopal church, and another ancestor of the family served as Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. 

(I) Elijah Benson, grandfather of Hubert G. Benson, was born in 
Newfoundland, and there spent his entire life, serving in the capacity of 
Methodist minister, being a pioneer circuit rider and founder of churches. 
He was probably never ordained, but being a man of excellent education, 
deep religious fervor and a natural leader of men, totally dissimilar to the 
majority of the inhabitants of that land, who were simple folk, engaged in 



676 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the fishing and coastwise trade, he was chosen to fill this responsible posi- 
tion, the duties of which he performed in a highly commendable manner. 
His death occurred in the year 1892. His wife, Elizabeth (Janes) Benson, 
also a native of Newfoundland, died January i, 1914, aged eighty-seven 
years. They were the parents of six children: i. William, lives at Grates 
Cove, Newfoundland. 2. Gideon, lives at Carbonear, Newfoundland. 3. 
Naomi, married Willis Moores, a carpenter, resides in St. John's. 4. 
Julia, married Joshua Benson, her fourth cousin, and resides in Saskatche- 
wan, Canada. 5. Elisha, of whom further. 6. Eli, deceased; was a car- 
penter by trade. 

(H) Elisha Benson, son of Elijah Benson, was born in Grates Cove, 
Newfoundland, 1846. He was reared and educated in his native land, and 
has resided there all his life, being at the present time (1914) engaged in 
carpentering and contracting, from which he derives a lucrative liveHhood. 
In early life he went to sea, and in due course of time became a foreign zone 
sea captain on large vessels, but later he abandoned this life and turned his 
attention to the line of work in which he is now engaged. He married 
Eliza Moores, born in Northern Bay, Newfoundland, in 1847, her parents 
being natives of Newfoundland, of Welsh descent, the father, who was a 
fisherman and farmer, died in 1902, aged ninety years; he and his family 
were members of the Methodist church ; in addition to Eliza, mentioned 
above, who was the youngest child in the family, they were the parents of 
three children : Willis ; Jordan, a sea captain on local boats of Newfound- 
land ; Frederick, a sea captain in local waters. Children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Benson: i. John C, formerly a resident of Brooklyn, now of Pittsburgh, 
a carpenter by trade ; married Mabel Thompson. 2. Hubert G., of whom 
further. 3. Joseph William, a resident of Pittsburgh, a druggist by pro- 
fession. 4. Jordan, a resident of Brooklyn, a structural iron worker by 
trade. 5. Drusilla, married Isaac Sparks ; resides in St. John's, Newfound- 
land. 6. Anna, married a Mr. Driscoll ; resides in St. John's, Newfound- 
land. 7. Ethel, resides in St. John's, Newfoundland. 

(Ill) Hubert G. Benson, son of Elisha Benson, was born in Grates 
Cove, Newfoundland, August 22, 1878. He attended the Methodist schools 
of St. John's, completing his studies at the age of twelve years. He then 
became apprenticed to a carpenter in his native city, served five years, and 
at the expiration of this period of time was proficient in all branches of 
the business. At the age of twenty years, unaccompanied, he removed to 
Brooklyn, Long Island, and there worked as a journeyman at his trade for 
one month. Upon his arrival in Brooklyn he had only $4.00 in his posses- 
sion, the half of which he spent in payment for an application for citizen- 
ship, but he has never for one moment regretted this step, being proud of 
his connection with so grand a country. From an almost penniless young 
man he has risen to a position of prominence in the business world, having 
a prosperous business of his own, a fine residence, and ranking among the 
best citizens of the city of Pittsburgh, whither he removed in the year 1899. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 677 

For the first three months of liis residence in Pittsburgh he was a journey- 
man carpenter, then accepted the position of foreman for contractors, serv- 
ing under a number of the large contractors of the city, and during this time 
he assisted in the erection of the majority of the largest buildings in Pitts- 
burgh, among which was the Washington County Court House. In 1908 
he engaged in business on his own account as a contractor, his first work in 
that line being in Knoxville, and since then he has been constantly engaged 
in large enterprises, from which he has derived a goodly income. In 191 1 he 
took up his residence in the borough of Carrick, has erected several houses, 
which he sold to advantage, and at the present time (1914) is building a 
residence for his own use on Brownsville road, which will be equipped with 
everything needful for the comfort of its inmates. In early life Mr. Benson 
went to sea in the sailing vessels on the Newfoundland coast, making many 
sailing trips to Labrador and the mainland. He is a member of Dallas 
Lodge, No. 508, Free and Accepted Masons ; Zerrubabel Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; Valley of Pittsburgh Council, Royal and Select Masters; 
Tancred Commandery, Knights Templar, and Pennsylvania Consistory, 
Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret. 

Mr. Benson married (first) in October, 1901, Jennie Hammond, born 
at Spring Run, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Martin Ham- 
mond. She died in November, 1906, Mr. Benson married (second) June, 
1908, Caroline Krehan, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
Ernest and Julia Krehan, natives of Germany, her birth occurring in Leip- 
zig; Mr. Krehan, now deceased, opened the Birmingham Drug Store on tlie 
South Side, Pittsburgh, where he was known as "'Squire" for many years. 
Children of second marriage: George Hubert, born April 5, 1909; John 
Charles, born September 24, 191 1. Mr. and Mrs. Benson are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



The surname of Gray or Grey has been in use from the earliest 
GRAY times in England and Scotland, and is of the same class as 
Black, White, Green, Brown, etc. The pages of history are 
brightly starred with the names of members of the Gray family who were 
very successful along many lines of work for the good of humanity. The 
stars which mark such names as that of our famous botanist. Dr. Asa Gray, 
are large and radiant. Whoever has marked the many pilgrims who stand 
by such graves as that of Dr. Gray, in Mount Auburn, or that of the author 
of the '"Elegy in a Country Churchyard," understands fully that no multi- 
plied years with their shadows can ever change, except to make brighter, 
the light which these men of heroic mould gave to their day and generation. 
Whatever the ancestry of the various Gray families, all are characterized 
by a deep religious spirit, an aptitude for various kinds of useful work, 
and the diligence to follow their chosen labor with a result which means 
work in which all men can trust. Though never office seekers, they have 
been given important places of trust in the communities in which they have 



678 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

dwelt, and their faithful discharge of every duty placed before them has 
been like that which they have given to their private affairs. 

(I) Edwin Gray, who lived in Rhode, Somersetshire, England, served 
in the English regular army, and in his later years was a pensioner. He 
had children : Thomas and John, soldiers in the English army ; Joseph, of 
further mention ; Edwin, served in the English marines ; a daughter, who 
married Lansdowne. 

(II) Joseph Gray, son of Edwin Gray, lived and died in the village 
of Rhode, England. He was born in 1812, died October 28, 1882. He 
was a cloth fuller by trade, and worked in the linen and cotton mills all 
the active years of his life. He and his wife belonged to the Church of 
England. He married Sarah Silcox, born in Rhode in 181 1, died there 
August 31, 1889. Children: i. Edwin, deceased, was for many years a 
soldier in the English army, and in his later years a shoemaker. 2. Isaac, 
served in the British navy in his younger days, taking part in the bombard- 
ment of Sebastopol ; later was in the mining business in Wales. 3. Thomas, 
married Ann Jenkins, a daughter of Thomas and Eliza (Morgans) Jen- 
kins ; he was a coal miner in Wales, and after coming to McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania, followed the same occupation until his death in 1905. 4. Elizabeth, 
died unmarried in England. 5. Joseph, now deceased ; was a soldier in 
the English army in India for seventeen years. 6. John S., of further 
mention. 

(III) John S. Gray, son of Joseph and Sarah (Silcox) Gray, was 
born in Rhode, Somersetshire, England, May 28, 1842. His opportunities 
for obtaining an education were very limited, and at the age of twelve 
years he went into a bakery and grocery store, in order to learn this busi- 
ness thoroughly and remained until he was seventeen years of age. In 
1865 he emigrated to America, going directly to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
and after a short time to Limeton, Pennsylvania, where he joined his 
brother Thomas and worked as a coal miner for many years. Twelve years 
were then spent in the structural iron department of the Carnegie Steel 
Company, and in 1903 he removed to Blair, Pennsylvania, and there started 
a grocery store, with which he is still successfully identified. He is a Re- 
publican in political matters, and he and his wife are members of the Bap- 
tist church. Mr. Gray married Catherine Jenkins, born near the City of 
Plumswansea, Wales, February i, 1842, a daughter of Thomas and Eliza 
(Morgans) Jenkins. Thomas Jenkins was born in Wales in 1802, died in 
1867. He was a coal miner, and a member of the Congregational church. 
Eliza (Morgans) Jenkins was born in Wales, died at the age of sixty-five 
years, while on the voyage to this country in 1866, and was buried at Hali- 
fax, Nova Scotia. They had children: i. Ann, who married Thomas Gray, 
died in 1914 at the age of eighty-five years. 2. Gwennie, married William 
Thomas, and lives at South Side, Pittsburgh. 3. Eliza, married a Mr. 
Sullivan, lived at Pittsburgh, both now deceased. 4. Lucy, married John 
Evans, lived in Pittsburgh, both deceased. 5. Mary, married George Reese, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 679 

lived at Dennis, Ohio, both now deceased. 6. Catherine, who married Mr. 
Gray, as above stated. 7. Margaret, married John Thomas, both deceased, 
lived at South Side, Pittsburgh. 8. William, a coal miner, died in Pitts- 
burgh. 9. Hannah, married Joseph Thomas, now deceased; she lives in 
Connellsville, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Gray have had children: Isaac, 
William, Thomas, John, Annie, and several who are deceased. 

(IV) William Gray, son of John S. and Catherine (Jenkins) Gray, 
was born at Banksville, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 4, 
1873. He attended the public schools at Jones Station and Jefferson town- 
ship and the high school at Elizabeth, from which he was graduated in 
the class of 1887. The following year the family removed to Homestead, 
where he worked at intervals in the glass factory for a period of fourteen 
years, commencing as an errand boy and working his way upward to the 
position of a packer. From his earliest years he had won local renown as 
a baseball player, having a strong arm and an unerring aim, and he played 
with the local Homestead team for several seasons, and it was soon ap- 
parent that he was above the ordinary player. This called the attention 
of the public to him, and he was finally chosen to play in the Iron and Oil 
League, at Titusville, Pennsylvania. In May, of that year, he went to 
Easton, and finished the season with the Pater son (New Jersey) team in 
which "Honus" John Henry Wagner was then playing. He was then 
drafted by the National League, but having injured his arm he was obliged 
to abandon ball playing. In 1900 he commenced working in the Homestead 
plant of the Carnegie Steel Company. He is a Republican in politics, was 
elected tax collector of the borough of Homestead in 1903, and held that 
office continuously until 1914. He is serving as one of the directors of 
the Oil and Gas Company, and lives at No. 315 Twelfth avenue. Home- 
stead. His fraternal affiliation is with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Knights of Malta. Mr. Gray married, November 12, 1896, Stella L., daugh- 
ter of Peter and Louise Stemler, of Homestead, of German descent, now de- 
ceased ; he was a glass worker. Mr. and Mrs. Gray have had children : 
Naomi, a student at the high school ; Ruth, Ella, Charles. 



Father John B. Haeckler, the rector of St. Henry's Cath- 
HAECKLER olic Church at St. Clair, Pennsylvania, is a native of 

Germany, and one of a family of ten children, five of 
whom besides our subject have come to this country, exemplifying in them- 
selves the best type of German-American citizenship which has added so 
valuable an element to the complex fabric of the American population, 
and engrafted upon it their own stalwart virtues of steadfast religious faith 
and unwearying pursuit of their objectives. 

Anton Haeckler, father of Father Haeckler, was a clockmaker of 
Voehrenbach, Baden, Germany, passed his entire life in his native region 
and was the father of ten children, six of whom emigrated from the 
"Fatherland" and made their home in the great republic of the "New 
World." These consisted, besides the subject of this sketch, of one brother 
and four sisters, the brother being Charles Haeckler, now a resident of 



68o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Two of the sisters are now living at Tomlin- 
son's Run, Pennsylvania, and are now Mrs. Annie Sweitzer and Mrs. Mary 
Sweitzer. A third sister is now Mrs. Adalaide Steimer, of Homestead, 
Pennsylvania, and a fourth is dead. This fourth sister joined an order 
of nuns and entered the convent known as the "Millvale House," at Mill- 
vale, Pennsylvania, where she took the name of Sister Hildegard, and 
eventually rose to be mother superior of the convent. The remaining four 
children remained in Germany, where they eventually died. 

Father John B. Haeckler, the ninth child of Anton and Emma (Eni- 
merentia) Haeckler, was born in Voehrenbach, in the Dukedom of Baden, 
Germany, June 22, 1863. He spent the early years of life in his native 
land, and received the first portion of his education in the Gymnasium at 
Marherau, Austria, near the city of Briganz. When but seventeen years 
of age, he emigrated to the United States, and there resumed his studies 
in the school at Herman, Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he had taken 
up his abode in the new land. He graduated from this school two years 
later. At that time he was already aware of his call to the priesthood and 
was turning his studies into the appropriate channels for this purpose. He 
next attended St. Francis College at "Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for the ex- 
cellent course in philosophy there, and upon completing this, returned east 
and matriculated at St. Mary's College in Baltimore, where he took thiee 
years in theology. Father Haeckler was ordained in the year 1886 by Cardi- 
nal Gibbons, and was at once made assistant at the Church of St. Joseph, 
Bloomfield, Pennsylvania. Here he remained for two years, and then was 
given the pastorate of the Church of St. Agnes at Tomlinson's Run, Penn- 
sylvania, a post which he retaine'd for twelve years. He was then pastor 
of St. Alphonsus' Church at Wexford, Pennsylvania, for three years, and 
in 1904 was sent to his present flock. At the time that he reached them there 
was but one church building in St. Clair, St. Joseph's, which all Catholics 
had to attend, though on account of its distance from some sections of 
the borough this was a great inconvenience. Finally a few representative 
men of the region about Mount Oliver, led by the Messrs. Andrew B. and 
Francis A. Armhein, were successful in organizing a new congregation, 
which later became known as St. Henry's. About one hundred and fifty 
families made up the little flock when Father Haeckler first ministered to 
them, and a small frame building was quickly put up adequate for them 
to meet in. With the rapid development of that community, and the wise 
management of Father Haeckler, the growth of the parish was very rapid, 
and before the expiration of the first year the church was too small to seat 
the congregation. The next building was erected the same year, and was 
a much larger structure composed of red brick, trimmed with bufif brick. 
It was built sufficiently large to include a parochial school which now num- 
bers six teachers and three hundred and fifty pupils. Since that time there 
has been added a handsome new convent building with accommodation for 
twelve nuns. Father Haeckler is a member of the Catholic Mutual Benefit 




^^LJi, ^,^Ca&3^i^^ 



WESTERN I'ENNSYLVANIA 681 

Association and the Knip;lits of St. George. He is much beloved by his 
flock, and a powerful influence for good, not only among them but in the 
community at large, setting a standard of conduct, alike by precept and 
example, of which even the most vicious and light-minded cannot fail to 
take note. 



The first Quinn of this branch to come to the United States 
QUINN was Hugh Quinn, born in Wales, who at fifteen years of age 

left his native land and about the year 1800 arrived in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. There he learned the carpenter's trade and became 
a contracting builder. When about forty-five years of age he purchased 
a farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county, and on it resided until his 
death. He was a man small in stature, but very energetic, industrious and 
capable. He was a Whig in politics, and a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. He married and had ten children, now all deceased: i. 
Mary, married Louis Bates, of Pittsburgh. 2. John, of further mention. 
3. Harriet, married Alexandria Adams. 4. Nancy, married John Davis. 5. 
Daniel, a carpenter, moved to Missouri. 6. William, owned and operated 
a farm on the Steubenville turnpike, in Robinson township. 7. Catherine, 
married John Cooper, who was killed in battle during the Civil War. 8. 
Isabella, twin of Catherine, married John Stewart. 9. Sarah, died unmar- 
ried. 10. Rebecca, married Joseph Delks, of Pittsburgh. 

(H) John Quinn. second son of Hugh Quinn, of Wales, was born in 
Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in May, 1816, died 
in March, 1905. His boyhood and youth were spent on the paternal farm 
in Robinson township, and in the public schools acquiring a good education. 
He learned the carpenter's trade during his minority, working under his 
father's instructions. He, however, had a love for the soil and as soon as 
he was of legal age abandoned his trade and began farming, renting a farm 
near his parents. Later he inherited a part of the homestead and until 
crippled by an accident was engaged in cultivating his own acres. Thi.-: 
accident occurred when he was thirty-five years of age, and for several years 
thereafter he could do little active work, but was employed as toll-gate 
keeper on the Steubenville pike. He later moved to Pittsburgh and worked 
at his trade, but four years later returned to his farm on which he resided 
for some years, but at his death was living in McDonald, Pennsylvania. 
Both he and his wife were members of the United Presbyterian Church. 

He married Jane Johnson, born in Finley township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1823, died in 1903, daughter of William and Margaret 
(Adams) Johnson, ^^'illiam Johnson was born in county Down, Ireland, 
coming to the United States when eighteen years of age. settling in Pitts- 
burgh, later in Robinson township, living on a rented farm. About 1S55 
he moved to Macon county. West Virginia, purchasing a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty, acres there. He was a large able bodied man. a strong 
Union sympathizer but had little trouble with his Southern neighbors as 



682 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

there were many Unionists in the county. Both he and his wife were United 
Presbyterians. He married Margaret Adams, born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, one of the early prominent families of the county. He died 
aged eighty-three years ; she at the age of eighty-six years. Children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson: i. Margaret, married William Hill, of Macon 
county. West Virginia. 2. Elizabeth, died unmarried, aged twenty-five 
years. 3. Thomas, married in West Virginia, and owned a farm in Macon 
county. 4. Susanna, married William Harper, of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Frances, married Rev. Louis Greenlee, a minister of tlie 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of West Virginia. 6. Jane, married John 
Quinn, of previous mention. 7. James, served three years in the Union 
army, as a cavalryman, died unmarried in 1868. Children of John and 
Jane (Johnson) Quinn: i. Hugh, a farmer and carpenter of Robinson 
township, now deceased. 2. William Johnson, of further mention. 3. Min- 
erva, married Louis Lauer, now a prosperous farmer of Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Louis, a painter by trade, residing near Danville, Vir- 
ginia, where he also conducts a small store. 5. John, died of scarlet fever, 
aged twelve years. 6. Margaret, also a victim of scarlet fever, died at the 
age of ten years. 7. Bella G., a school teacher, died in 1889. 

(HI) William Johnson Quinn, second son of John and Jane (Johnson) 
Quinn, was born in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
May 20, 1844. He was educated in the public schools of Robinson and 
Moon townships, and was his father's assistant until seventeen years of 
age, when he enlisted in the Union army. He entered the service, August 
20, 1862, served in Company A, of the Sixth Regiment, Young's Battery 
Heavy Artillery. He served throughout the war and was mustered out with 
an honorable discharge, June 16, 1865. After the war he located in Pitts- 
burgh, working at and learning the carpenter's trade, serving three years 
under Frazer Brothers, contractors and builders of that city. He then 
worked two years for Cochran Brothers, then fomied the contracting firm 
of Moore & Quinn, carrying on a building contracting business in Sharps- 
burg, Pennsylvania, for three years. The firm then dissolved, Mr. Quinn 
going to Verona, Pennsylvania, where for eighteen months he worked in a 
planing mill In 1877 he rnoved to Crafton, Pennsylvania, and in 1879 to 
Ingram, where he erected his present residence at No. 42 McKee street, 
and has since that date conducted a prosperous contracting business. He 
is well-known and highly-regarded, perhaps half of the houses erected in 
Ingram since he began business having been built under his direction. He 
is a skilled mechanic and an honorable builder. An ardent RepubHcan, he 
cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, when a candidate for re-election 
to the presidency and has always remained loyal to the party honored by 
the martyred president. Both he and his wife are charter members of the 
United Presbyterian Church of Ingram, Mr. Quinn having served as trustee. 

Mr. Quinn married, in 1871, Amelia Emerick. born in Butler county, 
Pennsylvania. Children: i. Mabel, married Frank McCurdy, a banker, of 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 683 

Ingram. 2. John M., a carpenter, of Pittsburgh. 3. Bella J., resides at 
home. 4. William G., a carpenter, associated in business with his father. 
5. Albert, resides at home. 6. Edwin B., a painter of Ingram. 7. Stella, 
died aged three and a half years. 



Of this generation of the Serena family we know there were 
SERENA sisters and brothers as follows: i. Samuel, a coal miner and 

river man; married Mary Ann Barnes. 2. Jacob, of further 
mention. 3. John, a farmer of Ligonier Valley. 4. A sister, who married 
, a farmer and householder at Rosston, Armstrong county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(II) Jacob Serena was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and 
was a river man and a coal miner. He married Mary Norris, and had 
children: i. David, who was employed at the tipples in the coal mines at 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 2. Barbara, lived in McKeesport. 3. John, of 
further mention. 4. Elizabeth, married James Means, a coal miner, and 
lived at Wild Cat Hollow, on the Youghiogheny river. 5. Ann, married 
William McMullen, a coal merchant and hotel proprietor at McKeesport. 
6. Sarah, married Hezekiah Long, a farmer of Allegheny county, who 
served as a soldier in the Civil War. 7. Joseph, lived in Cincinnati, where 
he had a retail coal yard in association with Dan Stone ; married Clara 
Dunlap. 

(III) John Serena, son of Jacob and Mary (Norris) Serena, was born 
at Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, and in early manhood worked on the Monon- 
gahela river as a boatman. He then became a worker in the coal mines 
near McKeesport, and rose to the position of superintendent of the mines 
across from McKeesport. In 1882 he founded the John Serena Company, 
in McKeesport, which handles retail coal and builders' supplies, and soon 
built up a remarkable business. He had his office and yards at the bridge 
over the Youghiogheny river at the foot of Fifth avenue. His death oc- 
curred in 1904. He was noted for his ability as an organizer and had a 
high standing in the business world. He served his community as a mem- 
ber of the borough council. He and his wife were members of the Second 
Presbyterian Church. He married Maria Jane White, who died in 
March, 191 1. Children: i. and 2. Belle and Ella, who died unmarried. 3. 
Anna, lives in McKeesport. 4. J. Frank, of further mention. 5. J. Elmer, 
now president of the John Serena Company. 6. Ida, married F. M. Rhodes, 
and lives in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) J. Frank Serena, son of John and Maria Jane (White) Serena,' 
was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, in September, 1859, died April 
26, 1910. His entire life was spent in McKeesport and its vicinity, and 
as a boy he commenced working in the mines under the supervision of his 
father. Later he worked in the pipe-threading department of the National 
Tube Works, and in 1882 became associated with his father when the 
latter organized the John Serena Company, and was subsequently admitted 



684 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

as a partner to this concern with which he was actively identified until his 
death. His religious affiliation was with the Presbyterian Church. He 
married Mary Elizabeth Deitrich, born at South Side, Pittsburgh, in 187 1, 
died in 1892, leaving an only child, Earl F. 

(V) Earl F. Serena, son of J. Frank and Mary Elizabeth (Deitrich) 
Serena, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1889. He attended 
the public schools until 1904, and then spent four years at the Staunton 
Military Academy, Virginia. In 1908-09 he was a student at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, and from 1909 to 1912 he studied law at the Syracuse 
University. While there he was a member of the Zeta Psi fraternity. In 
1912 he located in his home town, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and was 
elected to the vice-presidency of the John Serena Company, in whose in- 
terests he has been an active worker since that time. He is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias, Royal Arcanum and Junior Order of American 
Mechanics. Mr. Serena married Helen C. Vaughn, a native of Wilkins- 
burg, Pennsylvania ; they have one child, James Franklin. 



Descendant of Scotch ancestry, the north of Ireland is 
McMURRAY the locality whence came Joseph McMurray, the immi- 
grant ancestor of his line, one of the present day repre- 
sentatives of which is Ulysses G. McMurray, of this record. After his 
marriage in his native land Joseph McMurray came to the United States, 
settling in what is now South Fayette township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1820. Here he purchased and cleared land, which he cul- 
tivated for a time, then moved to Noblestown, where he was engaged in 
mercantile dealings until his death, about 1838. He had married, in Ireland, 
Martha Wilson, who survived him, marrying a second time, her husband 
being William Radclifife, her death occurring in Noblestown, Pennsylvania, 
in 1856. Both are buried at Braddock. Pennsylvania. They were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Children of Joseph and Martha (Wilson) 
McMurray: i. Anne Jane, married (first) a Mr. Brookins, (second) Wil- 
liam Reis, and died at Newcastle, Pennsylvania. 2. John, of whom further. 
3. Andrew Jackson, died in infancy. 4. A child, died in infancy. 5. 
Joseph, a gold miner, died in California in 1856. 6. Thomas, died in 1852, 
while journeying to California to join his brother, Joseph, in the gold fields 
of California. 7. George Washington, born December 14, 1832, died at 
Crafton, Pennsylvania, in 1913, a retired butcher, the last survivor of the 
children of Joseph and Martha (Wilson) McMurray. 8. William, a re- 
tired merchant of Crafton, Pennsylvania. 9. Catherine, married Samuel 
Waiters, and died in South Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 10. Margaret, died aged four years. 11. Eliza, married John D. 
Robb, and died on a farm near Oakdale, Pennsylvania. 

(II) John McMurray, son of Joseph and Martha (Wilson) McMur- 
ray, was born in South Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
October 5, 1822, died in Oakdale, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1900. He grew 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 685 

to man's estate on the home farm, and for a time after his marriage lived 
on the homestead, then moving to Ohio, where he Hved for about two 
years. At the end of this time he returned to the locahty of his birth, pur- 
chasing one hundred and ten acres of land from Hugh Wallace, residing 
thereon until 1882, then buying the James Pollock farm in South Fayette 
township and there made his home, retaining title to the former. After his 
retirement from active life he bought a house in (Jakdale where he lived 
until his death, his wife dying three years later. Eight oil wells, all pro- 
ducing at the present time, were driven on his land, and he became one of 
the most prosperous men of the neighborhood. He was active in local 
afifairs, holding Democratic political views, and with his wife belonged to 
the Presbyterian Church. He married Margaret Caldwell, born in North 
Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 2, 1823, died 
in 1903, daughter of Irish parents, early settlers of North Fayette township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where her father was a farmer and land 
owner. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell were the parents of: i. William, a cigar 
manufacturer, died in Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side) Pennsyl- 
vania. 2. John, a railroad employee, resides in Cleveland, Ohio. 3. Joseph, 
lives retired in Brookline, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, a veteran of the 
Civil War. 4. Alexander, twin of Joseph, died in Allegheny City, Penn- 
sylvania, a veteran of the Civil War. 5. Martha, married (first) George 
Snair, (second) Cassius Lucas, both deceased, and lives in Avalon, Penn- 
sylvania. 6. Ann, died unmarried. 7. Sarah, married Frederick Bennett, 
and lives in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 8. Jane, married a Mr. Kephart, and 
died in South Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 9. Mar- 
garet, of previous mention, married John McMurray. Children of John and 
Margaret (Caldwell) McMurray: i. Joseph, lives retired in Oakdale, 
Pennsylvania. 2. George W., met an accidental death in a boiler explosion, 
died on the old homestead. 3. Thomas, died at home, aged nineteen years. 
4. Robert, a farmer, lives on part of the homestead. 5. Ulysses G., of 
whom further. 6. Edward R., a resident of Pittsburgh. 7. William, a 
soldier in the Union army during the Civil War, was taken captive and died 
in Andersonville prison. Four other children died in infancy. 

(Ill) Ulysses G. McMurray, son of John and Margaret (Caldwell) 
McMurray, was born in North Fayette township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 4, 1865. As a youth he was a student in the public schools 
and Oakdale Academy, where all of his scholastic training was received. 
He entered business as an employee of the Duquesne National Bank, at 
Pittsburgh, where he remained for three years, and after his marriage was 
the proprietor of a cigar and tobacco store in that place, his residence in 
Oakdale. At the present time he is an extensive dealer in real estate and 
also holds agencies for several reputable fire insurance companies, among 
them the North British, the Mercantile, and the Pittsburgh Underwriters', 
the last virtually a consolidation of four companies. Mr. McMurray was in 
1902 elected a justice of the peace of Oakdale, an office to which he was 



686 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

successively re-elected in 1907 and 1913, now serving in that capacity. As 
a Democrat he has ever been a prominent personage in local political and 
public affairs, for five years being clerk of the council, afterward a member 
of that body, holding its presidency for two years. His record as a public 
servant, though it be searched from his humblest duty to his highest, reveals 
naught but careful fidelity to trust reposed in him, and exact fulfillment of 
every commission placed in his hands, while those who have come into as- 
sociation with him in the business world know that in all things he is 
honorable, upright and fair. He fraternizes with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and 
both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. McMurray married, in 1885, Kate, born in Carnegie, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Charles and Sarah Gamble, and has children: i. Homer, 
a locomotive fireman, resides in East Carnegie, Pennsylvania. 2. Clyde, 
an employee of the Armstrong Cork Company, lives at home. 3. Paul, died 
aged two years. 4. Clare, twin of Paul, died aged two years. The family 
home is on Spring avenue, Oakdale, Pennsylvania, where Mr. McMurray 
caused a house to be built in 1802. 



George Murray, a native of Scotland, located in London- 
MURRAY derry, Ireland, and in 1790 married Sara Montooth, of 

county Derry, and became the father of William, of further 
mention, Henry and John. In 1795 he came to America, locating at Brad- 
dock's Field, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1797. Henry and John went 
to Ohio, then to Illinois, and their descendants are scattered throughout the 
west. 

(II) William Murray, son of George Murray, was born in county 
Derry, Ireland, in 1791, was brought to America at the age of four years. 
At a suitable age he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, and 
later was a baker on the North Side, Pittsburgh. In 1830 he purchased a 
farm about seven miles south of the Ohio river, in what is now Bethel town- 
ship. This consisted of about two hundred acres of partially improved 
land, and he cleared more of it and farmed it until his death in 1870. He 
took an active part in local political affairs. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian Church, and both are buried in Mount 
Lebanon Cemetery. Mr. Murray married Jane Gailey, and they had chil- 
dren : James Gailey, of further mention ; Sara, married Rev. Dr. Robert 
R. Gailey, and died in Ohio in 1900; John D., is now eighty-nine years of 
age, and lives on a part of the original Murray homestead; Henry Harrison, 
spent his entire life on the iMurray homestead, and died there November 7, 
1907. 

(III) James Gailey Murray, son of William and Jane (Gailey) Murray, 
was born June 21, 1820, in Peters township, Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where his parents were living temporarily. His early years were spent 
on his father's farm in what is now Bethel township, and in young man- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 687 

hood he eslabhshed himself in the mercantile business in Allegheny City, 
now a part of Pittsburgh, on East lane and Madison avenue, where he re- 
mained five years, and then removed to Sodom, where he conducted a gen- 
eral store until 1867. Removing to Bridgeville, he continued his mercantile 
activities there, and also conducted a saw and grist mill until his election as 
county commissioner and afterwards as county treasurer of Allegheny 
county. He was always prominent in the political life of the community, 
served as a member of the school board, as a member of the board of the 
State Reform School. In his youth he had been a staunch Abolitionist, and 
was one of the organizers of the Republican party in Allegheny county in 
1856. With three or four others, he prepared the famous "Split Tree 
Banner" carried in the parades and rallies at the time of the first election 
of Abraham Lincoln. He served as a member of the county committee. 
He attended the Presbyterian Church, and was a member and treasurer of 
the building committee of the old church. In addition to all the above men- 
tioned activities, in 1869-71, he was one of the organizers of the Chartiers 
Railway Company, and succeeded in getting the right of way for its con- 
struction. Mr. Murray married Elizabeth Boyer, born near Library, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Jacob Boyer, an old settler in 
that section. They had children : Albert Boyer, a merchant in Bridgeville ; 
W^illiam H., died at the age of twenty-two years ; Emma Jane, died at the 
age of twenty years; James Frank, of further mention; George Piersol, a 
member of the Allegheny county bar; Annie Matilda, now deceased; mar- 
ried Robert N. McElroy ; Grant Simpson, of further mention. 

(IV) James Frank Murray, son of James Gailey and Elizabeth (Boyer) 
Murray, was born at Sodom, near Bethel and Bridgeville, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, August 19, 1857. His earlier education was acquired in the 
public schools in the vicinity of his home, and he then became a student af 
the Western University. In his boyhood he assisted his father in the store 
of the latter, and he was in office as first assistant cashier while his father 
was county treasurer, 1877-78. From 1879 to 1881 he was assistant ser- 
geant-at-arms in the Pennsylvania state senate, after which he was in the 
internal revenue service until 1883. For some time he was then superin- 
tendent of the document department in the Pennsylvania senate, then re- 
turned to the revenue service. Abandoning politics, he became interested 
in the management of the Chartiers Railway Company, of which he was a 
director, an office he held until it was absorbed by the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company in 1906. He and his brother, Grant Simpson, were the 
proprietors of the Builders' Supply Company on the North Side, Pittsburgh. 
They sold this business, and February 9, 1910, again in partnership with 
his brother, Grant Simpson, opened offices for the conduct of a brokerage 
business on the third floor of the Union Bank Building, Pittsburgh, and have 
been located there since that time, doing a general brokerage business. They 
operate under the firm name of Murray Brothers, and are members of the 
Pittsburgh Stock Exchange. Mr. Murray is a director of the Bridgeville 



688 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Trust Company, the Waynesburg Home Gas Company, the Virginia Crown 
Orchard Company, and a member of the Pittsburgh Chamber of Com- 
merce. He resided in Pittsburgh seventeen years, but in recent years has 
made his home in Bridgeville, where some of his younger years were spent. 
There he is a member of the Presbyterian Church, has served as deacon, and 
was treasurer of the building committee when the present building was 
erected. 

Mr. Murray married, April 21, 1887, Sara Lewis, born in Pittsburgh, 
a daughter of Thomas and Justine (Lewis) Davitt, and a descendant of an 
old family. They have had children: Amos Lewis, died in infancy; 
Thomas Davitt, born August 29, 1892, a graduate of the Washington and 
Jefferson College, and a member of the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, now a 
student in the law department of the University of Pittsburgh. 

(IV) Grant Simpson Murray, son of James Gailey and Elizabeth 
(Boyer) Murray, was born in Upper St. Clair township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, October 22, 1865. He was educated at the Bridgeville public 
school from whence he went to the Western University, after which he be- 
came connected with the Keystone Bridge Company, of Pittsburgh, with 
whom he remained for a period of six years. He and his brother, James 
Frank, then formed a partnership and o'rganized the Builders' Supply Com- 
pany, under the name of Murray Brothers, in 1890, continuing it until 1910, 
their establishment being located on Sandusky street, North Side. Upon 
selling this in 1910, they established themselves in the brokerage business 
in the Union Bank Building, and are still located there. Mr. Murray is a 
member of the Pittsburgh Stock Exchange and represents the firm on the 
floor of the Exchange. He is a member of a number of organizations, 
among them being the following : Lodge No. 45, Free and Accepted Masons, 
of which he is a past master; Pittsburgh Consistory, Royal and Select 
Masters ; Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine ; Pittsburgh Athletic Association, Tarifif Club ; Friendship Avenue 
Presbyterian Church. He resides in East End, Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Murray married, October 27, 1892, Nellie, born in Pittsburgh, a 
daughter of Edward N. and Mary Hurd, and they have children : Mar- 
garet, a graduate of Miss Shaw's School, in Pittsburgh; Lawrence, a stu- 
dent at East Liberty Academy; Elizabeth and Edward. 



Ireland has long been the home of the ancestors of Samuel 
TOPLEY J. Topley, of this chronicle, the family having been planted 

in the United States by his father, James Topley. James 
Topley was a son of James and Ann Topley, natives of Ireland, where 
they passed their lives, James (i) Topley dying when his son James was 
an infant. 

(II) James (2) Topley, son of James (i) and Ann Topley, was born 
in Ireland, and was there educated, afterward becoming proficient at the 
trade of weaver. In 1866 he came to the United States, settling in North 
Versailles township, Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, where he engaged in 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 689 

coal mining. This calling he later abandoned in favor of farming, and was 
so engaged until his death, lie married Mary, daughter of John and Nancy 
Blakely, her parents natives of Ireland, where her father was killed in a 
boiler explosion, her mother emigrating to the United States in 1866. 
Children of James and Mary (Blakely) Topley : Ann, Susan, Mary, Mar- 
garet, James, Agnes, Rachel, Samuel J., of whom further, Nellie, William. 

(Ill) Samuel J. Topley, son of James (2) and Mary (Blakelyj Topley, 
was born in North Versailles township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
October 30, 1875. As a youth he attended the local schools^ and after finish- 
ing his studies learned the trade of brass fini.sher, at which he was occupied 
for seventeen years. In 1907 Mr. Topley withdrew from this business and 
entered real estate dealing in East McKeesport, where he continues in that 
line at this time. Although his business interests are in East McKeesport, 
he retains his residence in North Versailles township. For the past ten 
years Mr. Topley has been a justice of the peace, an office from which he 
retired in May, 1914. For eleven years he discharged the duties of town- 
ship clerk, and in November, 1913, was elected township treasurer, which 
position he now fills. He is a member of the Masonic Order, belonging to 
Tyrian Lodge, No. 612, Aliquippa Lodge, Knights of Pythias, the Knights 
of the Mystic Chain, the Royal Arcanum, and the Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics. He is prominent in public life, and as the incumbent 
of the offices previously mentioned has served faithfully and well, receiving 
from his fellows naught but commendation. His business is in a most 
flourishing condition, and in the seven years that he has dealt in real estate 
he has acquired a patronage that has been constantly on the increase, his 
reputation growing through the successful deals that he has directed. 

Mr. Topley married. May 11, 1896, Zelma Sarver, of North Versailles 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and has children: Chalmers R., 
Homer L., John G., Blanche L. 



George Fetterman McNeilly is descended on both sides of 
McNEILLY the house from very old and distinguished families, his 
father's family having been prominent in Ireland at least 
as far back as 1640, and one branch of his maternal ancestry having been 
well known in England from a still earlier date. The McNeilly family 
were for many generations residents of that most picturesque section 
of a lovely country, county Antrim, Ireland, and were members of the 
local aristocracy. Their arms, dating from early times, are a lymphad. 
sails furled, on a chief amulet. Surmounting the arms is an esquire's 
helmet with mantling crest, an arm in armor embowed, holding a sword. 
Motto over crest : Vincere vcl Mori. One of the name was present at the 
famous siege of Londonderry when the city made good its defence against 
the arms of England, ordered against it by James II. A McNeilly fought 
under the command of Colonel Upton, the squire of the parish, and later 
returned in safety to his home, none the worse for the sanguinary struggle 
he had been engaged in. There is an interesting reference in the report of 



690 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the Society for the Preservation of the Memorials of the Dead, to the Mc- 
Neilly family. "McNeilly-1740," runs the report, "This family is now 
scarce in the parish, and unfortunately the old stone bearing these arms was 
destroyed some years ago. The present stone bears date 1807. To mem- 
bers of this family were 'Elders of Session of Templepatrick, being pub- 
lickly admitted and sworn with prayer and fasting ye 22nd day of Novem- 
ber, being ye Lord's day, 1646.' " 

(I) Coming down to more recent times we find record of Andrew Mc- 
Neilly, the grandfather of George F. McNeilly, and a prominent man in 
his county. He lived his entire life in county Antrim, finally dying there, 
and all his life was connected with the great linen industry for which Ulster 
is justly famous. He and his wife were both members of the Presbyterian 
Church. He married Martha Boyd, also a native of county Antrim. They 
were the parents of eight children, as follows: Joseph, of whom further; 
John, a bachelor, now following the occupation of gardening in Mount 
Lebanon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, having emigrated to 
the United States in his youth ; James, who also came to the United States, 
and engaged in farming and gardening in Baldwin township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, where he eventually died ; Andrew, also a resident 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he holds the position of stable 
boss at Beadling; Robert, a farmer of Mount Lebanon township; Elizabeth, 
deceased, became Mrs. James Leeburn, and continued a resident of county 
Antrim, Ireland. Besides those above enumerated, there were two other 
children who died in very early youth in county Antrim. 

(II) Joseph McNeilly, son of Andrew McNeilly, was born in the fall 
of the year 1826, in county Antrim, Ireland. He spent his childhood and 
youth in his native land, subsequently setting sail for the United States, in 
the hope and belief that greater opportunities awaited him in the vast new 
republic of the west than at home. In this example he was followed by all 
his brothers, the one sister being the only one to remain in the place of 
their birth. Coming to Pennsylvania, he married Mrs. Hannah Maria 
(Fetterman) Silk, the widow of Joseph Silk, a soldier in the Union army 
during the Civil War, who was killed at Chattanooga, and the mother of 
two children, Lucy and Josephine, only the latter of whom was living at 
the time of her mother's second marriage, and who later married Samuel 
Anderson, of Dormont, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Joseph McNeilly was the 
daughter of Nathaniel Plummer and Anna Maria (Dillon) Fetterman, 
and was born in Beaver, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1842. 
Nathaniel Plummer Fetterman was born February 13, 1805, on the old 
Fetterman homestead in Beaver county. He studied for the law and prac- 
ticed for a time in Beaver, Pennsylvania, but later removed to Pittsburgh, 
where he continued for the remainder of his life and built up a large prac- 
tice. He was the son of George and Hannah (Plummer) Fetterman, the 
former of German descent, but a 'native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
who in his youth removed to Allegheny county and was married. He had 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 691 

three children by his wife but was then divorced from her. Nathaniel 
Plummer Fetterman married Anna Maria Dillon, December 28, 1828, and 
had ten children, as follows: Martha Eliza, who later became Mrs. Thomas 
Collins ; Virginia Dillon, deceased, became Mrs. Captain William Blake ; 
Lawrence Tolliver; Anna Valeria, became Mrs. Joseph Claybaugh ; Charles 
Sylvester; Hannah Maria, who married Joseph McNeilly ; George Hum- 
phrey, a resident of Castle Shannon, Pennsylvania; Washington Wilfred 
and Nathaniel Plummer, twins ; Emily Johnston, who died at the age of 
twenty years. 

It was through Hannah Plummer, the wife of George Fetterman, and 
great-grandmother of George F. McNeilly, that the old New England 
stock was introduced into the family. The first Plummers in this country- 
were Francis and Ruth Plummer, husband and wife, both natives of Eng- 
land, who came to the American colonies in the year 1633, and settled in 
Newbury, Massachusetts, two years later. One of their sons, Joseph 
Plummer, was born in England in 1630, and came to America when but 
three years of age. He later married Sarah Cherrey, and died in 1683. 
Following the direct line of descent we come to a son of the last named 
couple, one Jonathan Plummer, born May 16, 1668, who passed his life in 
his native state of Massachusetts, and married Sarah Pearson. Next in 
order of descent was John Plummer, born in Massachusetts in the year 
1697, and who married Rebecca Wheeler. Their son, another Jonathan 
Plummer, brings us down to revolutionary times, Jonathan Plummer serv- 
ing as an officer in that momentous struggle. Not a great deal is known of 
him, but that he was a stout patriot and an able man. He was born in 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, April 13, 1724, but the place of his death is 
unrecorded. It is known, however, that he did not continue to live in the 
region so long occupied by his forebears. On the contrary he did consider- 
able moving about the country, .going first to New Jersey, and later to 
Maryland. In the latter state he settled in Frederick county for a time, 
but later went to Old Town in the same state, where he was engaged in the 
Indian trade. He was actively engaged in the Indian troubles as well, and 
helped to keep General Braddock supplied during that ofificer's campaign 
in Pennsylvania against the red man, which turned out so disastrously, 
but gave General Washington an opportunity to distinguish himself. Mr. 
Plummer, indeed, left his wife and children in fort, and accompanied Gen- 
eral Braddock to Fort Duquesne, Pennsylvania, thus reaching the neigh- 
borhood which was later to become the home of his descendants. He did 
not remain there, however, but later returned to Maryland. He married 
(first) Elizabeth Mehetable Herriman, June 6, 1744, but after her death 
and upon his settling in Maryland, he married (second) Sarah Farrell, of 
that state. Nathaniel Plummer, a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Mehetable 
(Herriman) Plummer, was born March i, 1745, in Essex county, Massa- 
chusetts. He grew up in his native place, spending the years of his youth 
and young manhood there, until he was about thirty-five years of age. 



692 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Then, about 1780, he moved to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, with his 
wife and family. Here he settled on what is now known as the Anderson 
Farm, within the limits of the present borough of Dormont, a location 
which is still the home of his descendants. In this region, then but a 
wilderness, he acquired a tract of some four hundred acres, which with 
his sons he cleared of the virgin growth and reclaimed for the purposes 
of agriculture. Here, also, he erected the first house in the neighborhood. 
This building is of stone and is still standing in a state of excellent preserva- 
tion, forming one of the landmarks of the community. The stone from 
which it was constructed was gathered from the farm in the process of 
clearing it. Here Nathaniel Plummer finally came to his death, January 
29, 1821, and lies buried in the old St. Clair burying ground. He married 
Hannah Jones, also a native of Massachusetts, where she was born July 
6, 1745, surviving her husband six years. To them were born seven chil- 
dren, as follows: Elizabeth, born March 24, 1769; Hetty, born March 19, 
1771 ; Samuel, born October 6, 1772, died October 10, 1810; Nathaniel, 
born August 14, 1775 ; Arnold, born April 9, 1778, died in infancy; Walker, 
born December 28, 1779, died at the age of two years; Hannah, born June 
15, 1783, who later became the wife of _ George Fetterman. Her birth took 
place in the old stone house already mentioned, and she met Mr. Fetterman, 
when as a very young man he settled in Allegheny county. After her 
divorce from Mr. Fetterman, she continued to reside in the old Fetterman 
homestead with her three children : Nathaniel, the grandfather of George 
F. McNeilly ; Washington, who became a well known lawyer of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, and for whose son Gilbert the Marquis of Lafayette 
stood sponsor in baptism, on the occasion of that great man's visit to the 
city ; George, who graduated from West Point and became an officer in the 
United States army, but died finally on the old homestead. Mrs. Fetterman 
was an extremely capable woman, and of the most enterprising nature. 
She raised silkworms and hops for the support of herself and her children, 
and directed the whole farm with great success. She was afterwards mar- 
ried to Dr. Ruggles Sylvester, and had two children, both of whom, how- 
ever, died in early youth. Nathaniel Fetterman, whose life has already been 
briefly noticed in this sketch, was the father of Mrs. McNeilly, the mother 
of George F. McNeilly. 

After their marriage on January i, 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mc- 
Neilly settled in Scott township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and en- 
gaged in farming and gardening on a property of some sixty acres, pur- 
chased by him. The place was larger than he cared to manage, however, 
and he sold a portion of it, and later the remainder, making the latter sale 
about 1875. In the same year he bought a smaller place of about six and 
a half acres, in what was then known as West Liberty borough, and here 
he has lived ever since. Mr. McNeilly is now known as the oldest farmer 
and gardener in the Pittsburgh region, his farm being now included within 
that city's limits. He is a member of the Republican party and today takes 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 693 

as keen an interest as ever in the great questions and issues before the 
country. Both he and Mrs. McNeilly are members of the United Pre?- 
byterian Church. They are the parents of but one child, George Fetter- 
man, of whom further. 

(Ill) George Fetterman McNeilly, only child of Joseph and Hannah 
Maria (Fettermanj McNeilly, was born October 8, 1873, in Scott town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was educated at the local public 
schools, and upon completing his studies he took up farming and gardening, 
the occupation of his father. This he has continued always down to the 
present time, despite his other interests, and still superintends the running 
of the home place. At the time of the organization of the borough of 
Dormont, when real estate values were increasing, Mr. McNeilly became 
interested in real estate in his region, and has successfully operated in the 
same, having already built some seven houses in the borough. He is a man 
of substance and of influence in his community, and takes an active part in 
the life of the borough. He is a member of the Republican party, as was 
also his father, and is vitally interested in all political questions whether of 
local or national bearing. 

Mr. McNeilly married, June 16, 1908, Margaret Lindsay Leeburn, a 
native of county Antrim, Ireland, whence Mr. McNeilly's own people came, 
and a daughter of James and Elizabeth (McNeilly) Leeburn. Mrs. Lee- 
burn is now dead, but Mr. Leeburn is still residing in county Antrim. Mrs. 
McNeilly was born there, December 26, 1876, but came in her youth to the 
United States, and made her home in Pennsylvania, where she met Mr. 
McNeilly. They are the parents of one child, Martha Leeburn, born June 
21, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. McNeilly are both staunch members of the Pres- 
byterian Church, attending St. Clair United Presbyterian Church, and are 
active in supporting it and its many benevolences. 



William Biddlestone was born in West Bromwich, 
BIDDLESTONE Staffordshire, England, and there spent his entire 

life. He was a worker in the iron mills, and he and 
his wife were members of the Episcopal Church. He married Abigail 
Morris, and they had children : Isaac, of further mention ; Solomon, a mill 
man ; Joseph, also a mill man ; Caroline, married James Whitehouse. All 
died in England. 

(II) Isaac Biddlestone, son of William and Abigail (Morris) Biddle- 
stone, was born in the same town as his father, and was employed in the 
heating department of the iron mills. He died at the age of thirty-two 
years. For a number of years he had been bell ringer of Christ Church, 
and he is buried in the church yard. He married Catherine Stephen, who 
married (second) Hazard Parker, and died at about the age of sixty-three 
years. She was also a member of the Episcopal Church, and is buried in 
the old Parish .church yard. She was a daughter of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth (Partridge) Stephen, both natives of West Bromwich, where he was 



694 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a blacksmith, and who had children : Hannah, Sarah, Catherine, Jane, 
Edward, Thomas. Mr. and Mrs. Biddlestone had children: Samuel, of 
further mention ; Harriet, married William King Jr., came to America, 
and died at Muncie, Indiana; Thomas W., now baggage master at Mc- 
Keesport for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company; Peter, died at the 
age of twelve years ; Lydia, married John Blick, and lives in Smethwick, 
England ; Elizabeth, married, and lives in Sheffield, England. 

(HI) Samuel Biddlestone, son of Isaac and Catherine (Stephen) Bid- 
dlestone, was born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire, England, October 27, 
1861. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and there 
learned the blacksmith's trade, with which he was identified until he came 
to this country. He arrived in America in 1881 by way of Canada, and 
in July of the same year settled at McKeesport, whose interests he has had 
at heart since that time. For a period of three years he worked at his trade 
in the employ of the National Tube Works, then entered the employ of 
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, being station baggage master 
eight years and bill clerk one year. In August, 1893, he established him- 
self in the transfer business, commencing with two wagons, and the same 
year bought out the McKeesport Transfer Company, which he has con- 
ducted since that time, for general transfer and storage, having added a 
storage plant about 1904. He now employs four teams and wagons and 
about eight men. Until recently he was a Republican in politics but is 
now a Socialist. He and his wife are members of St. Stephen's Episcopal 
Church, in which he is secretary of the board of vestrymen. He is a mem- 
ber of the Workmen of the World, the Knights of Malta, the Sons of St. 
George and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. 

Mr. Biddlestone married, November 29, 1884, Charlotte, born in the 
same town as her husband, and a daughter of Sidney Barnett. They have 
had children: Percy S., born in 1885, died November 28, 191 1, married 
Pearl Rader, and had one daughter, Charlotte Belle ; William B., in busi- 
ness with his father, married Mary Schrieber, and has children, William 
Samuel and Ruth Eleanor; Elsie, married Carl Lottig, and has a daughter, 
Lois Elizabeth; Mabel, died in infancy; Clififord Charles; Bessie; Herbert; 
Milton, died in infancy; Elizabeth, died in infancy; Dorothy; George. 



A representative of an English ancestry, also a native of Eng- 
OLIVER land, Robert Oliver, for many years a resident of McKees- 
port, is a man whose career is well worthy of emulation, 
having attained a place of prominence in the business world, well known 
and respected by all with whom he is brought in contact, either in business 
or social life. 

Richard Oliver, father of Robert Oliver, was born, lived and died in 
Stolbridge, Dorsetshire, England, where he followed the trade of baker, 
and won the esteem of his neighbor,s by his upright character and mode of 
life. His wife, Elizabeth (Harris) Oliver, who also was born, lived and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 695 

died in Stolbridge, England, bore him four children: Julia; Henrietta; 
Robert, of whom further; John, who emigrated to the United States, July 
12, 1871, and settled in McKccsport, Pennsylvania, where he was a mer- 
chant tailor for many years, achieving a certain degree of success; he was 
reared and educated in Stolbridge, England; he never married; his death 
occurred October 31, 1894. 

Robert Oliver was born in Stolbridge, Dorsetshire, England, Septem- 
ber 8, 1846. He was reared and educated in his native place, and upon 
attaining a suitable age was apprenticed to Stephen Harris, his maternal 
grandfather, to learn the carpenter trade, of which he became a thorough 
master, becoming highly proficient in all its branches. In May, 1869, he left 
his native land for the United States, taking up his residence in McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, where for a number of years he worked at his trade, 
thus earning a lucrative livelihood. In 1873 he engaged in the contracting 
business, which has proved highly remunerative, he being awarded many 
of the contracts for work done in his adopted city, his reputation for re- 
liable and conscientious work being well established. In 1872 he erected a 
residence for his own use at No. 1030 Walnut street, and in addition to 
this is the owner of a number of houses in McKeesport, which fact is an 
eloquent testimonial to his energy, thrift and enterprise. Mr. Oliver and 
his wife have been to England and back seven times. In May, 1877, his 
wife went to England on the "Indiana" from Philadelphia, and among her 
fellow passengers were General Grant and wife, also Jesse Grant, the 
journey being eleven days in duration, she arriving in Liverpool, England. 
In September, 1877, they again returned to England, remaining there for 
ten years, and at the expiration of this period of time they returned to the 
United States and again took up their residence in McKeesport, where they 
have resided ever since. Mr. Oliver is a member of the Episcopal Church, 
and his political support is given to the Republican party. 

Mr. Oliver married. May i, 1871, in England, Emily James, born in 
Dorsetshire, England, August 18, 1846, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Ann (Foote) James, both of whom hved and died in England. I\Ir. and 
Mrs. James were the parents of eight children, namely: Mary, deceased; 
Joseph; James, deceased; Emily; Louisa, deceased; William, deceased; 
Annie, deceased; Ada. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver have no children. 



There follows a chronicle that, could it appear before the 
WAGNER eyes of the entire American public, would, beyond the sus- 
picion of a doubt, receive more interested reading than 
almost any record of its kind, despite the fact that the greater part thereof 
is familiar to that same public, the biography of John Henry Wagner, 
"Honus" Wagner, one of the greatest exponents of America's national 
game. 

He is a son of German parents, his father, Peter John Wagner, having 
been born in the village of Dirmingen,«on the river Rhine, Germany, where 



696 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

he grew to maturity and was married. About 1866 he came to the United 
States, followed in six months by his wife, settling first in Carnegie, where 
he was for a time employed in the mines, later becoming a hotel proprietor 
in Chartiers borough, now a part of Carnegie, Pennsylvania. A few years 
later he abandoned this pursuit and returned to mine employment, soon 
afterward retiring, his death occurring in 191 3. He married in Dirmingen, 
Germany, Catherine Wolfe, there born, who died in September, 1901. Both 
were members of the Lutheran Church. They were the parents of nine 
children, three of whom died in infancy, the surviving children being as 
follows : Charles ; Albert, a professional base-ball player, lives in Carnegie, 
Pennsylvania; Louis; John Henry, of whom further; Carrie; William. 

John Henry Wagner, son of Peter John and Catherine (Wolfe) Wag- 
ner, was born in Mansfield Valley (Carnegie), Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, February 24, 1874. He was educated in the public schools, later 
attending private institutions, both German and English, and while a lad 
began to display the ability that has made him the peer of all of his pro- 
fession. He was employed for a short time in the local lead works, and 
in 1891 made his entry into organized base-ball, playing for one year 
and a half in the Allegheny County League, shortstop being the position 
that he then chose and in which he has since remained excepting on such 
occasions as have made it necessary for him to strengthen some weak point 
on his team, in which emergencies he has filled every position excepting 
that of catcher. The season of 1892 found him a member of the St. Luke's 
team, and from that time until 1894 he played on the semi-professional team 
of Dennison, Ohio. Steubenville, Ohio, was at that time represented by a 
team of the Tri-State League, and in 1895 he was with that team in the 
Tri-State circuit, from 1896 until June, 1897, being with the Paterson, 
New Jersey, team. At that date he made his first major league appearance 
in the National League, wearing the uniform of the Louisville, Kentucky, 
team, with which organization he remained during the seasons of 1897-98- 
99. In 1900 he began his fourteen years' association with the Pittsburgh 
National League team, and as the shortstop of that aggregation has played 
through season after season, the reliable excellence of his play varying 
only to improve, always the invincible tower of strength to the Pirate team. 
About him have been built to fall, only to be built again, pennant contenders, 
pennant winners, and world's champions ; to the Pittsburgh club have come 
stars, apparently of the first magnitude, whose light has dimmed through 
day after day of use and exposure; his supremacy in his position has been 
assailed, but to be returned to him intact ; and through myriad changes 
in rules and regulations of this distinctively American game, he has re- 
mained steadfast, the height of his profession attained and held. Of him 
the Reach Official American League Baseball Guide says: "In the year 
1912 Shortstop John H. Wagner, of the Pittsburgh National League Club, 
established a world's record by batting 300 per cent, consecutively for 
sixteen years — he thus passing A. C. Anson's long-standing fifteen-year 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 697 

record. In the 1913 season Wagner batted just 300, thus adding another 
year to his world's record and making it so much harder for any other 
batsman to pass it in the near future — and such a batsman is not in sight 
at the present time, as Cobb, the only man who appears to have a chance for 
that honor, is hardly likely to remain in the game long enough to accom- 
plish that feat ; without considering that Wagner may add another link to 
his long chain in 1914." In fielding, as at the bat, he is undoubtedly su- 
perior to any of his rivals in his position, despite the fact of his forty 
years. The countless thousands that have been thrilled by his marvellous 
plays and the graceful ease with which they are executed have been obliged, 
through proof submitted, to acknowledge him the master of base-ball, and 
some odd millions of red-blooded Americans the length and breadth of the 
United States have so acclaimed him. He has prospered in his profession, 
and through wise investment is one of the most prosperous players in base- 
ball, but the greatest treasures that have come from him are not in his 
keeping ; they are locked in the memories of those who have derived pleasure 
from his matchless performances on the diamond, the recounting of which 
is a story that loses none of its interest through repetition. 

He finds the most enjoyable relaxation in chicken raising, and his Bufif 
Plymouth Rocks and White Leghorns are well-known in the poultry ex- 
hibitions of the vicinity, where he bears considerable reputation as a chicken 
fancier. Not only is he admired by all and pride taken in him because of 
his base-ball fame and ability, but the irreproachable ordering of his life 
and his manly character have won him honor and respect such as is ac- 
corded only those who have shown worth and merit, and the friendly 
"Honus" that greets him in Carnegie is a tribute to more than the diamond 
star. 

He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
Loyal Order of Moose, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle, the Kenmore Athletic Club, of New York City, and the 
Owls. Politically he is an Independent. 



Joseph J. Werner is one of a family representative of the 
WERNER best type of German-American character, which has con- 
tributed to the cosmopolitan citizenship of the United 
States a leaven of its own peculiar virtues, an unswerving devotion in the 
pursuit of an objective and great endurance in labor. 

His father was Joseph Werner, a native of Germany, who passed his 
youth in his native land where he learned the trade of stone mason. Dur- 
ing the revolution of 1848-49. Mr. Werner, like so many of Germanv's 
strongest sons, felt the social conditions at home to be intolerable and 
turned with eager heart to the accounts of the freedom and opportunity 
for personal endeavor to be found in the great republic of the Western 
Hemisphere. It was during the same period of storm and stress that 'Mr. 
Werner actually sailed for the United States, there to make a new home 



698 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

for himself and family. Transatlantic travel was not in those days what 
it is now, and his voyage occupied a period of forty-two days, during the 
course of which his vessel ran down a freighter. He finally arrived safely, 
however, in the port of New York, and from there travelled still farther 
west, principally by canal to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In this city he took 
up his abode and proceeded to follow the stone mason's trade, which he 
had learned in the "Fatherland." He eventually died in Pittsburgh, at the 
advanced age of eighty-three years. Before leaving his native land he had 
married Eva Kofifman, a fellow countrywoman, who accompanied him to 
America and died in Pittsburgh at the age of seventy-nine years. They 
were the parents of children, as follows: Barbara; Dortha, deceased; 
Mary; John, who fell into the Allegheny river at the foot of Sixth street, 
Pittsburgh, and was drowned; Amadeus; Joseph J., of whom further. 
There were two other children, a boy and a girl, both of whom died in 
early youth. Mr. Werner was a member of the Roman Catholic Church, 
attending St. Mary's Church of that denomination in Pittsburgh. 

Joseph J. Werner, the seventh child of Joseph and Eva (Koffman) 
Werner, was born August 22, 1858, in Allegheny, near Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. He was educated in the Catholic parochial schools of his native 
city, but at the age of twelve and a half years he left his studies and ap- 
pHed himself diligently to learning the trade of painting under the tutelage 
of Joseph Debaugher at Troy Hill, and later served an apprenticeship of 
four years under Adolphus Stebner. At the end of this period he found 
employment as a journeyman which occupied him about a year, and in 
the year 1880 he entered into partnership with a Mr. Dietrich and estab- 
lished a painting business under the firm name of Dietrich & Werner. After 
eight years this successful partnership was dissolved. At the time of this 
dissolution the firm had two painting houses, one at Allegheny City and 
the other at Millvale, Pennsylvania. In the year 1886 Mr. Werner removed 
to Millvale and there settled, and he continued to carry on the painting 
business under his own name. This he did with great success until the 
year 191 1, when he took into partnership his eldest son, Joseph M. Werner, 
the firm now being known as Joseph J. Werner & Son. The business is 
that of house painting and hardwood finishing, and has grown without 
pause to its present large proportions. In 1899 Mr. Werner erected a 
large new shop situated on North avenue, Millvale, and there he is at 
present located. He also erected a handsome dwelling for himself at the 
same time. Mr. Werner is a member of the Master House Painters' Asso- 
ciation, of which he has been a trustee since 1891, and is now the chair- 
man of the executive committee. Mr. Werner and his family are mem- 
bers of St. Ann's Catholic Church of Millvale, and he has been a trustee 
of the same for the past fifteen years. 

Mr. Werner married, 1880, Agnes Conner, a native of London, where 
she was born 1859, and a resident of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, at the time 
of her marriage. The wedding ceremony was performed by the Right 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 699 

Rev. Phelan, Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Werner have been born five children, as follows : Joseph M., of whom fur- 
ther; Mary, now Mrs. Edward Gorman, of Millvale, Pennsylvania, and 
the mother of three children, Edward, Virginia and Ethel; Agnes; Walter, 
employed as boy in his father's business house; Nelson, at present attend- 
ing school. 

Joseph M. Werner, the junior partner in his father's painting estab- 
lishment, is a rising young man in Millvale. He is a staunch member of 
the Democratic party, takes a vital interest in all political questions, whether 
of local or general application, and plays an active part in the party life in 
his town. He has already been elected to the Millvale borough council 
and is the youngest man on that body. He married Miss O'Connell, a 
native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. To them has been born a daughter, 
Rebecca Werner. 



In 1836 Malah Garbart, widow of John Garbart, arrived 
GARBART in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with her four children, locat- 
ing in what is now known as the "W^est End," where she 
died. John Garbart was born in London, England, there married and lived 
until just prior to the birth of his second child. He then moved to Wales 
and there worked in the mines for several years, finally returning to Lon- 
don where he met accidental death. In 1836 his widow, Malah, brought 
her four children to the United States, as stated. Children, all deceased: 
William, a coal miner; John, of whom further; Sarah, married Perry Miller, 
a steel mill worker of Pittsburgh ; Joseph, died in middle life, unmarried, 
a river man and his mother's support. 

(II) John (2) Garbart, son of John (i) and Malah Garbart, was born 
in Wales, February 3, 1821, died April 14, 1891. His boyhood was spent, 
from an early age, in the coal mines of the district in which he lived, and 
later after the return of the family to England he worked in the English 
mines. At age of fifteen years, in 1836, he came with his mother, brothers 
and sister to Pittsburgh and for about three years after his arrival worked 
in the coal mines of the Pittsburgh district. He then learned the ship car- 
penter's trade and followed that occupation until his death. When the local 
demand for boats failed to keep him busy he would build on speculation, 
then float the boats down the Ohio river until a buyer was found. During 
the Civil War he was in the employ of the United States government, boat- 
ing coal down the rivers for use on the gunboats and steamers used by the 
government. Often he was in great danger, Confederate guns having to be 
run past, very often on the lower river. He married Harriet Graham, born 
in Chartiers township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1829. died 1874, 
daughter of Samuel and Esther (Wilson) Graham, both born in Chartiers 
township, of old Allegheny county families. Samuel Graham owned a farm 
near the present town of Ingram which he cultivated, also operated a coal 
mine on his own farm. He converted coal into coke in his own ovens, being 



700 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

one of the very first coke manufacturers in that section. The log house in 
which he Hved is still standing in part, but in the remodeling has largely 
disappeared. He died aged seventy-eight years. He was known as "Judge" 
Graham from his dignified appearance and grave manner. Esther (Wilson) 
Graham, his second wife, died in 1895, aged ninety-four years. She was 
a descendant of James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Children of Samuel Graham by his first wife : Mary Jane, Elizabeth, Lem- 
uel and Addison, the two latter soldiers of the Union army, 1861-65. Chil- 
dren of Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilson) Graham: Emily, married William 
Miller, and lived in Chartiers township; Harriet, married John Garbart, of 
previous mention; George, lived in Chartiers township; Avery T., now re- 
siding in Pittsburgh West End. Children of John (2) and Harriet 
(Graham) Garbart: Amelia, died in 1907, unmarried; Ross W., now a 
retired glass worker; William G., a carpenter, residing in Pittsburgh, mar- 
ried Margaret Spring; Ida M., resides in Westwood, Pennsylvania; Clara 
Emma, died February 3, 1908, unmarried; John G., of whom further; Mary 
B., married Charles Koener, manager for the National Biscuit Company, 
at Westwood ; Esther M., married Ferdinand Andrews, and resides at Perth 
Amboy, New Jersey. 

(Ill) John G. Garbart, son of John (2) and Harriet (Graham) Gar- 
bart, was born in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, March 
7, 1864. He attended the public schools of Pittsburgh West End until thir- 
teen years of age, then became a wage earner, working at whatever came in 
his way that he was able to properly do. After working in this way for a 
few years he determined upon a settled occupation and began learning the 
carpenter's trade. From 1884 until 1894 he worked under George Swartz, 
a building contractor of the West End, becoming an expert workman and 
a foreman. In 1894 he became foreman and superintendent of construction 
under S. T. Verner, a large building contractor of Ingram, Pennsylvania, 
continuing until the death of Mr. Verner ten years later. In 1904 Mr. 
Garbart purchased from the Verner heirs the business and estate left by 
their father, and has since continued as builder and contractor, doing a 
very large business in the Ingram district. During his years of prepara- 
tion for the prosperous business he now conducts, Mr. Garbart took courses 
in architectural drawing by correspondence and became competent to design 
buildings and draw the plans from which he constructed them. Many of 
the hundreds of buildings he has erected in Ingram and vicinity have been 
of his own design and from his own well executed drawings and plans. In 
1905 he erected his own brick residence on Verner avenue, Ingram. He is 
highly regarded, not only as a capable builder and reliable contractor, but 
as a good citizen, friend and neighbor. He is independent in politics, and 
with his wife holds membership in the United Presbyterian Church of 
Ingram. He is prominent in the Masonic Order, belonging to Crafton 
Lodge, No. 653, Free and Accepted Masons; Cyrus Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Mount Moriah Council, Royal and Select Masters ; Chartiers Com- 




QJ^A 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 701 

manciery, No. 78, Knights Templar, and is a thirty-second degree Mason 
of Pennsylvania Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, lie also holds 
membership in the order of Heptasophs and Modern Woodmen of America. 
Mr. Garbart married, June 10, 1890, Dora J. Brimm, born in Robinson 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Daniel and Dorothy 
Brimm, both born in Germany, later coming to the United States where 
Daniel Brimm, now deceased, became a farmer of Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania. Children: Helen M., born May 9, 1891 ; James Wilson, July 4, 
1894; John G. (2), August 3, 1899; Dorothy, November 24, 1901 ; Charles, 
April 14, 1904; Esther L., September 24, 1910. 



The Ochse family is one of those which have come to America 
OCHSE from Germany, and have brought to this country those habits 

of thrift and industry so characteristic of the Germans. 
Henry Ochse was born in Oberholzhausen, Frankenburg, Germany, 
May 18, 1820, died December 22, 1905. He emigrated to America in 1839, 
coming on a sailing vessel which took fifty-seven days for the passage. For 
a short time he lived in Baltimore, Maryland, then removed to Etna, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, where he made his permanent home. He was 
an iron mill worker all his life. At the time of his death he had spent more 
years in Etna than anyone else living in the place at that time. He took a 
deep interest in the public welfare of the community, was the first burgess 
of Etna, and at different times filled all the other local offices. He was 
president of the board of directors of the West Liberty Orphans' Home, 
and a charter member of the German Evangelical Church. Mr. Ochse mar- 
ried, in 1841, Mary Sutter, born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, in 1823, 
was two years of age when brought to Etna by her parents, and died there 
in 1901, a daughter of John and Sarah Sutter, natives of Switzerland, who 
were two years en route to this country. They first located in Clarion county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was a farmer, then came to Etna, driving their 
cattle with them. Mr. and Mrs. Ochse have had children: i. John J., en- 
listed in Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, 
died in the hospital at Washington, District of Columbia, January 24. 1864, 
and is buried in Etna. 2. Charles D., now deceased; was postmaster of 
Etna for seventeen years. 3. Henry W.. of further mention. 4. Samuel 
J., now deceased ; was in the insurance business. 5. Wilhelmina, married 
John Landried. 6. Mary F., married William P. McKee. 7. Emma E. 8. 
Louisa R., married John Metzger Jr. 

Henry W. Ochse, son of Henry and Mary (Sutter) Ochse. was born 
in Etna, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 13, 1850. He received 
his education in the common schools, and then became a heater in a rolling 
mill, an occupation he followed for some time. He then established him- 
self in the dry goods business in Etna in 1880, and continued this until 
June, 1909. For many years he has been prominently identified with public 



703 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

matters in Etna, and has been a staunch supporter of the Republican party. 
He was burgess of Etna in 1886 and has in turn filled all the offices of the 
borough. As school director he has done much for the cause of education in 
that section. In 1893 he became a director of the poor, and served in this 
office for a period of nineteen years, and October 20, 1910, he was elected 
president of the Pennsylvania Association of Directors of the Poor. In 
March, 191 2, he was appointed to the board of county viewers, and is still 
serving in this office. He is a member of all the Masonic bodies, of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. In the last mentioned order he was the first exalted ruler 
in Etna. Mr. Ochse married (first) in 1872, Julia D. Neumeister, born in 
1853, died in September, 1903. He married (second) June 22, 1905, Laura 
Schumann, of Davenport and Kansas City. 



The Williams family of Glassport, worthily represented 

WILLIAMS in the present generation by Alfred D. Williams, actively 

and prominently identified with various industries that add 

to the prosperity and advancement of Glassport, is of Welsh origin, the early 

members of the family passing their entire lives in Wales. 

William C. Williams, father of Alfred D. Williams, was a native of 
Wales, as was also his father, who was born, lived and died there. William 
C. Williams was reared, educated and married in Wales, and in the year 
1859 came to the United States, settling in the state of Maryland. At the 
commencement of the Civil War he enlisted his services in behalf of his 
adopted country, and served until the cessation of hostilities, his brother-in- 
law, Adam Morgan, also serving throughout the entire period. His wife, 
Harriet M. (Morgan) Williams, did not accompany her husband to this 
country, and during the Civil War, fearing that he might have died, she came 
to Maryland and upon his discharge from the service of the government 
they met in Boston, Massachusetts. Her father died in Wales, and her 
mother, Harriet Morgan, came to this country, making her home in Mary- 
land, where her death occurred. Subsequently Mr. and Mrs. Williams 
went to Brewster, Ohio, and in 1880 removed to West Newton, Pennsyl- 
vania, where they both died in the same year, 1893. During his residence 
in West Newton Mr. Williams served as a practical miner in the Darr 
Mines. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was also 
his wife, and he was an ardent Republican in politics. They were the 
parents of six children : Sarah ; Adam, deceased ; William G. ; David J. ; 
Hattie M., deceased ; Alfred D., of whom further. 

Alfred D. Williams was born in Barton, Maryland. August 12, 1869. 
His education was obtained in the schools of Brewster, Ohio, whither .his 
parents removed, and at age of eleven years they again moved to West 
Newton, Pennsylvania. The following year he began work in a coal tipple, 
oiling wagons, and later again resumed his studies, becoming a member of 
the Scranton Correspondence School, and also attended night school at West 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 703 

Newton, thus greatly supplementing his early studies. At the age of twenty- 
one, having mastered the trade of machinist, he took charge of a machine 
shop at West Newton, and later was employed in the Darr Mines, and still 
later in the Port Royal Mines Nos. i and 2. He then entered the employ 
of Booth & Flinn, with whom he remained three years, and in 1902 he came 
to Glassport and purchased a substantial brick building and engaged in 
the grocery and meat business, continuing for three years, at the expiration 
of which time he engaged in the hotel business and has since been proprietor 
of the Manhattan Hotel, he giving it that name. He has met with success 
in this enterprise, he being thoroughly qualified to cater to people of taste 
and refinement, and his house is the best patronized in that section. He also 
organized the I. X. & L. Tire and Rubber Company, in June, 191 3, of 
which he is president, and later re-organized and capitalized it at $300,000 
under the name of Williams Tire and Rubber Company, located at Vista, 
Pennsylvania. He is also president of the Hamilton Land Improvement 
Company at Vista, Pennsylvania. He is active in the ranks of the Repub- 
lican party, but has never aspired to public office. He is a member of 
Lodge No. 136, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, at McKeesport; 
life member of Aerie No. 1185, Fraternal Order of Eagles, of Glassport; 
member of Knights of Pythias and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
Mr. Williams married, December 25, 1890, Mattie May Marks, of 
West Newton, Pennsylvania, daughter of James D. and Sarah Marks, the 
former named a policeman of Glassport. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liams : I. Ethel May, graduate of Glassport High School, Dillsworth Hall, 
Pennsylvania College for Women at Pittsburgh, from which institution 
she received the degree of Bachelor of Arts, graduating in social service 
and music, and (1914) in Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, studying 
music, and in the same year accepted position as teacher in German and 
Latin in the Glassport High School. 2. Alfred D. Jr., an attendant of the 
Glassport High School ; engaged with his brother, Clyde M., in the bicycle 
and motor cycle repair and accessory business located at No. 707 Mo- 
nongahela avenue, Glassport. 3. Clyde M., an attendant of the Glassport 
High School. The family is among the highly respected ones in that sec- 
tion, enjoying the acquaintance of a large number of people, who appreciate 
them at their true worth. 



Frederick Snitger, for many years a merchant of Beaver, 
SNITGER Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and a native of Germany, ac- 
companied his parents to the United States, they settling in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where their latter years were passed. 
Both are buried near Perrysville, Pennsylvania. 

Frederick Snitger early in life chose a mercantile career, making 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, his field of labor, where he met with favorable suc- 
cess. One of his sons, William H., is now a merchant of that place, his 
establishment located on Market street. Frederick Snitger was politically a 



704 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Democrat, and with his wife a member of the Presbyterian church. He 
married Martha Huch, hke himself a native of Germany, and had issue: 
I. Lavinia, deceased. 2. Henrietta, deceased. 3. Lewis, deceased. 4. Wil- 
Ham H., a merchant of Beaver, Pennsylvania. 5. Frank, deceased. 6. 
Martha, married D. L. Clark, president of the Jewel Candy Company. 7. 
Caroline. 8. Joseph B., of whom further. 

Joseph B. Snitger, son of Frederick and Martha (Huch) Snitger, was 
born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, July 20, 1875. He was reared in 
Beaver, and there obtained his education by attendance at the public 
schools, beginning business life as a partner of a brother as Snitger Brothers, 
the two conducting grocery dealings in Beaver. In 1894 Mr. Snitger moved 
to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, becoming associated with the firm of D. L. 
Clark & Company. In 1910 this concern was incorporated under the laws 
of Pennsylvania as the Jewel Candy Company, its officers being D. L. 
Clark, president; O. M. Rodecap, vice-president; Joseph M. Snitger, treas- 
urer, and E. O. Long, secretary. The company's plant is located at Nos. 905 
and 907 Walnut street, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and here it has enjoyed 
a prosperous continuance under its new direction, as under its old. Its 
officers are men of recognized standing in business afifairs, and by their 
careful administration of the duties of their respective offices have come 
to be a strong and vigorous organization, promoting to the fullest extent 
the interests of the company, their policy having been one of conservative 
expansion. To this rule Mr. Snitger is no exception, and he competently 
handles the finances of the growing business. He is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, and in political matters is uninfluenced 
by party obligations. 

Mr. Snitger married, in March, 1904, Cordelia, daughter of William 
and Josephine (Means) Edmundson, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
and Mrs. Snitger have one son, Robert Smiley. The family home is at 
No. 161 5 Manor avenue, McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 



This branch of the German family of Keitzer had its found- 
KEITZER ing in the emigration to the United States of Conrad 

Keitzer, born in Germany, settling in Whitehall, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, immediately upon arrival. His trade was that of 
wagon-maker, and he was so employed until 1893, when, his wife having 
died about 1891, he retired and passed his last days with his children, his 
death occurring at the home of his daughter, Kate, in Baldwin township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Both he and his wife are buried in Mount 
Zion Cemetery, Whitehall, Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Mary, were 
members of the Lutheran Church, active in its work, regular and devoted 
attendants at its services. Children of Conrad and Mary Keitzer: i. 
Henry, a wagon-maker and carpenter, died in Baldwin township, Pennsyl- 
vania. 2. Kate, married John Rothair, and died in Baldwin township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. 3. Caroline, married Christian Vondera, and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 705 

resides in Homestead, Pennsylvania. 4. Jacob, a carpenter, lives in Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania. 5. Martha, married Henry Matthews, and lives in 
Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 6. Louisa, married 
Herman Freidel, and lives in Munhall, Pennsylvania. 7. George, of whom 
further. 8. William, a farmer, near East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

George Keitzer, son of Conrad and Mary Keitzer, was born in Bald- 
win township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, August i, i860, died in 
Homestead, that county, September i, 1906. After a public school educa- 
tion he learned the blacksmith's trade in West Liberty (Nineteenth Ward of 
Pittsburgh), and for five years thereafter was associated in business with 
his father at Whitehall. Moving to Homestead, Pennsylvania, he there 
established in the manufacture of carriages and buggies, his place of busi- 
ness being on Eighth avenue between Amity and West, where he continued 
until 1892, employing an average working force of ten men. In 1902 he, 
in conjunction with W. S. Bullock, G. B. L. Wickerham, D. R. Edwards, 
Edward Rott, J. W. Bainbridge, C. W. Ashley, L. S. and Oscar Lawson, and 
Miles McConnon, organized the Enterprise Land and Improvement Com- 
pany, a concern that for a number of years conducted a large real estate 
and building trade. Two years after its formation Mr. Keitzer withdrew 
therefrom, engaging in independent dealings of the same nature until his 
death. His personal success and the prosperity that came to him through 
his enterprises meeting with favorable result came to him entirely through 
his intelligently directed efforts, any project to which he committed himself 
receiving his hearty and whole-souled support. He was content to stand 
or fall by his first judgment, and in such excellent esteem was he held that 
his faith in a business venture lent strength and stability to its organization. 
His fair and open manner of business procedure won him rnany friends to 
whom he was unknown outside of business relations, while he in private 
life possessed a wide circle of tried and trusted friends who had tested the 
depth of his character and found his true worth. He was a staunch Re- 
publican. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Keitzer married, March 26, 1885, Mary J. Gibson, born in Mount 
Washington, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, February 15, 1866, daughter of 
James and Margaret (Gildroy) Gibson, her father and mother both of 
English descent, the former born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the latter in 
England, coming to the United States with her parents when seven years of 
age. Both parents grew to maturity in Pittsburgh, and after their marriage 
lived for a time in the middle of the city, later moving to West End, where 
her father was a farmer until his retirement, at one time owning consid- 
erable property and now, aged eighty years, retaining title to a part thereof. 
He was a member of the Sixty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry during the Civil War. Her mother died in 1908. aged sixty-two 
years. James and Margaret (Gildroy) Gibson were the parents of four- 
teen children, eight of whom are living at the present time. Children of 
George and Mary J. (Gibson) Keitzer: i. William Gibson, born Decem- 



7o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ber 23, 1887, an engineer, married Florence Wagner, and lives in Carnegie, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Gilmer Roy, born June i. 1891, a law student, lives at 
home. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Keitzer has lived at Ninth 
avenue and West street, Homestead, Pennsylvania. 

About the year 1817, Stephen Mills came to the "Forks of the 

IMILLS Allegheny" with his wife and two sons. He was of English 

ancestry, the family coming from England and first settling in 

the West Indies. After a few months spent in Bermuda, they came to the 

United States, settling in New York state, on Long Island. 

The founder of the family in this country, George Mills, came to 
Jamaica, Long Island, about 1656, and there reared a family, whose 
descendants have scattered to every part of the L'nited States. 

(I) Stephen ]\Iills, a shoemaker, married a ]\Iiss Osborne, about 181 7, 
and settled on a farm in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He had two sons 
and three daughters. 

(II) Isaac Mills, eldest son of Stephen Mills, was born in New 
York City in 1801. He was the successful business man of the family and 
became an important factor in the founding of the now important city of 
Braddock. He came to Western Pennsylvania with his father when six- 
teen years of age and spent his early life on the Allegheny county farm. 
In 1826 he leased two hundred acres, and in 1827 purchased the farm on the 
Monongahela, now the third ward of Braddock. He became prosperous, 
and in addition to an active life in tlie business world was prominent in 
church and educational work. He was one of the founders and charter 
members of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in Braddock and 
continued its chief pillar for many years. He was one of the founders of 
Bethany College and for many years he had a scholarship in the college at 
his disposal. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Snodgrass, 
descendant of an ancient Scotch-Irish family. Children : Mary, Eliza, 
Isaac, Helena, Rachel, Nancy J., Charles, James K., Stephen, Samuel. 

(III) Isaac (2) Mills, son of Isaac (i) and Elizabeth (Snodgrass) 
Mills, was born at the old Mill's homestead, now the third ward of the city 
of Braddock, Pennsylvania, January 21, 1838, died in Braddock, March 
4, 1902. He was well educated in public and private schools, and worked 
on the farni until 1861 when he enlisted in Company A, Sixty-third Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, United States army, going out as 
sergeant and coming home with a captain's commission. He served three 
years, participated in many battles, marched with Sherman from "Atlanta 
to the sea," and when his term expired received an honorable discharge. On 
his return home he opened a store on Liberty street, Pittsburgh, dealing in 
cement, sewer pipe and mason's materials. He added to his mercantile 
lines the business of contracting, being the pioneer contractor of the various 
kinds of cement construction in Pittsburgh. One of the buildings that he 
fitted out with cement basement and window casings, the Christ Magee 
home, is still standirig. He continued in successful business in Pittsburgh 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 707 

for twenty years, but retained liis residence in BrafUlock. y\fter twenty 
years in active business, he retired, and after his father's death, he 
devoted his time to the management and settlement of the estate left by 
the latter. The old farm he divided into streets and building lots, which 
soon attained great value, his brother, James K., being also associated with 
him in the work of handling the property. In time the land was covered 
with buildings and was added to the city of Braddock as the third ward. 
Isaac Mills served two terms as burgess of Braddock and was always active 
in public affairs. He was a Republican in politics, a member of the church, 
Disciples of Christ, the Grand Army of the Republic and the Union Veteran 
Legion. He was universally respected and held in highest esteem where 
best known. 

Isaac Mills married, December 5, 1865, Mary E. Nichols, born in 
Freedom, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and Sarah 
(Hartzell) Nichols, both of German parentage. Sarah Hartzell's parents 
were of German birth and speech and resided on a farm near Canton, 
Ohio, and had twelve sons, and two daughters, Sarah and Elizabeth. John 
Nichols was a man of education and was principal of a school near his 
Ohio home. Later he moved to Freedom, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
where he established a general store which he conducted until his death, 
also for a few of his later years engaged in cement manufacture. He lived 
in Baden and Freedom, and for several years was postmaster at both places 
but at different times. • He died at the age of sixty-one years, his wife at 
the age of fifty-eight years. Children: i. Hampton, a farmer of Economy 
township. 2. Elizabeth, married Dr. David Shanor, of Unionville, Penn- 
sylvania. 3. Adelia, married Joseph L. Everage, a wholesale merchant of 
Zanesville, Ohio. 4. David, for twenty-three years supervisor of the United 
States census bureau, resided in Washington, D. C. 5. Mary E., now 
widow of Isaac Mills and with her youngest brother, John, the last of their 
family. 6. John, a grocer of West Newton, Pennsylvania, married Georgia 
Loop. Children of Isaac and Mary E. (Nichols) Mills: i. Charles P., 
now chief clerk for the Cambria Steel Company ; resides in Johnstown ; 
married Esther Cunningham. 2. Alice M., married John Hay, an expert in 
steel manufacturing; resides at Woodlyn, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. 
3. Edgar R., chief clerk for the Columbia Steel and Shafting Company, at 
Rankin, Pennsylvania; married Sarah Markle. 4. Arthur N., inspector for 
the United States government at Panama; married Ada Mc^NIichaels. 
5. Ralph J., an employee of the Carnegie Steel Company; resides at Brad- 
dock ; married Beatrice Rose. 6. Henry Clay, paymaster for the McClin- 
tock Marshall Company ; resides at Swissvale. Pennsylvania ; married Alma 
Fax. 7. Eliza Adelia, died aged one year. Mrs. Mary E. (Nichols) Mills 
continues her residence at the old home, No. 417 Braddock avenue, Brad- 
dock. 



A great number of the residents of a large city are 

BLOCKINGER men of foreign birth, who have sought a home in the 

New World which oft'ered larger opportunities for 



7o8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

advancement and progress, and among the men of this class resident in 
Carrick, Pennsylvania, is August Blockinger, who is now living retired 
from active business pursuits, enjoying the pleasures of life, a well-earned 
rest from years of toil. 

(I) Peter Blockinger, grandfather of August Blockinger, a descendant 
of French ancestry, was born in Alsace, near the town of Strassburg, then 
France, now Germany. He fought under Napoleon during his early man- 
hood. He was the proprietor of a country hotel and lodging house on a 
main thoroughfare in his native place, and in 1842 he and his wife emi- 
grated to the United States in company with their son, Louis, and finally 
located on South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where their deaths oc- 
curred and their remains are interred in old St. Michael's Cemetery. His 
wife, Anna Blockinger, also a native of Alsace, bore him five children: 
I. Louis, of whom further. 2. Lucas, was a blacksmith by trade; served in 
the Civil War; resided on South Side, Pittsburgh. 3. Peter, was a mould 
maker in glass factories ; resided on Soutli Side, Pittsburgh. 4. Cecelia, 
married William Renner, proprietor of a confectionery store in Columbus, 
Ohio. 5. Frances, married Blossey Marlot, who conducted a grocery and 
milk dairy; resided on South Side, Pittsburgh. 

(H) Louis Blockinger, son of Peter Blockinger, was born in Alsace, 
near the town of Strassburg, now part of Germany, 18 10, died in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, 1896, aged eighty-six years. He was reared, edu- 
cated and married in his native land, and in 1842, accompanied by his 
parents and family, emigrated to the United States, settling at first in New 
Orleans, Louisiana. Later he purchased a farm in Lawrence county, 
Indiana, which was then in the wilderness, and this he cleared and culti- 
vated, and the year following the big fire in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
came to Allegheny City, now part of Pittsburgh, where he worked at 
Saw Mill Run, in the blacksmith department of a rolling mill. The family 
then removed to South Side, Pittsburgh, and the father worked as a teaser 
in the glass factory. His next employment was in Louth's Rolling Mill, 
and then for Jones & Laughlin, who absorbed the business of Louth & 
Debold. 

He married (first) Francisca Champion, born in France, 1812, 
died 1845, who bore him four children: i. Louis, deceased; was a bottle 
blower by trade ; served for three years in the regular army prior to the 
Civil War and served for the five years in the Civil War ; was wounded 
by Indians at Fort Larimer, fighting the Black Hawks, prior to the Civil 
War. 2. Louise, married Jacob Hammer, a shoemaker; resided in Pitts- 
burgh, where their deaths occurred. 3. Joseph, deceased; lived on South 
Side, Pittsburgh ; was a heater in a rolling mill. 4. August, of whom further. 
Mr. Blockinger and his first wife were members of the Roman Catholic 

Church. He married (second) Lininger, who died a few years later; 

no children. He married (third) Mrs. Anna Greeninger, a widow, born in 
Germany, came to this country, locating in Pittsburgh in young womanhood ; 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 709 

she had three children by her first husband, as follows: Mirot, resides in 
Wheeling, West Virginia; Sefrain, deceased; Stephanis, married John 
Mosyan, both deceased. 

(Ill) August Blockinger, son of Louis Blockinger, was born in Alsace, 
then France, now Germany, August 31, 1841. He attended St. Michael's 
parochial school and later a night school, thus acquiring a practical edu- 
cation. He began his active business career at the age of twelve years, 
securing employment in Mulaney's glass factory. His next employment 
was in a brickyard, where he worked during the summer months, and he 
then became an employee in Louth & Debold's rolling mill, being employed 
in the sheet mill. His next employment was as heater in the sheet mill, after 
which he accepted a similar position with the firm of Morehead & McLean, 
with whom he remained for twenty years, and subsequently he was em- 
ployed in a public rolling mill. He resided on the South Side, Pittsburgh, 
at the corner of Twenty-sixth and Carson streets, until 1902, when he sold 
his property and purchased a house at No. 252 Boulevard, Carrick, where 
he is living retired. He has been industrious and frugal, hence is enabled 
to pass his declining years without labor, free from worry and care. 

Mr. Blockinger married (first) in 1862, Josephine Daschbaugh, born on 
South Side, Pittsburgh, died 1869. She was a regular attendant of the 
Roman Catholic Church, as was also her husband. Children : i. Mary, mar- 
ried James Austin, a grocer ; resides in Pittsburgh. 2. William, resides in 
Portsmouth, Ohio; a sheet roller by trade. 3. Josephine, married Jacob 
Lantz, a foreman in the steel works ; resides in Carrick, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Blockinger married (second) in 1872, Mrs. Mary (Berg) Iliflf, a widow 
with two children, namely : Leta, married George Daschbach, and resides 
in San Diego, California; Clara, married W. J. Benchart, and resides in 
Carrick, Pennsylvania. Mr. Blockinger had one child by his second wife, 
Luella, married Alva W. Smith, a manufacturer; resides in Aspinwall, 
Pennsylvania. Mrs. Blockinger, who was a Lutheran in religion, died in 
April, 1909. 



From far-away Germany came Peter May, and, on a 
MAY-LUTZ different date, John Lutz, the former settling in Chicago, 

Illinois, the latter in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. !Many 
years thereafter a son of the former and a daughter of the latter met in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, were mutually attracted and married. Four years 
thereafter a fatal accident on the hunting field ended the career of the 
husband, and since 1886 the sombre garments of a widow has been the 
wife's portion. She is a resident of Carrick, Pennsylvania, a lady beloved 
and respected. Both families were of ancient German lineage and in pros- 
perous circumstances, influential in their communities. 

Peter May was born in 1831, in the city of Trier (the German name 
of Treves), a city of Rhenish Prussia, situated on the right bank of the river 
Moselle, probably the oldest town in Germany. Here in the shadow of the 
-venerable cathedral, containing the famous "Seamless Coat," he grew to 



710 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

manhood and became skillful in tanning leather, one of the principal indus- 
tries of Trier. He married, in his native city, Elizabeth Von Meltzhiemer, 
of an old and prominent Prussian family, and soon afterwards came to the 
United States with his bride. He located in Chicago, where he employed 
his expert knowledge of tanning leather to good advantage. He became 
the owner of a large tannery and conducted a most prosperous business 
until his death in 1896. He built a fine residence on Chicago's North Side 
and there maintained his aristocratic wife in even greater comfort and 
luxury than she had been accustomed to in her German home as a 
daughter of a wealthy man and distant connection of royalty. Children : 
I. Elizabeth, married Herbert Monzell, a foreman in Clark's furniture 
factory, Chicago. 2. Gertrude, married Charles Lowry, a broker of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. 3. John, of further mention. 

John May, youngest child and only son of Peter and Elizabeth (Von 
Meltzhiemer) May, was born in Chicago, Illinois, November 21, 1857, died 
March 4, 1886. His father, a man of wealth, gave him all the advantages 
of a classical education, for which he prepared in the grammar and high 
schools of Chicago. After completing a brilliant college career, he entered 
business life in Milwaukee, where he became superintendent of one of the 
important departments of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. 
There he married and lived until his tragic death four years later in Arizona, 
where he was visiting friends. He was fond of field sports, particularly 
hunting, and while preparing for a day's shooting with his friends, his 
gun was accidentally discharged, with fatal result to himself. He was a 
man of fine intellectual quality and business ability, kindly, affectionate 
nature and greatly beloved by family and friends. 

John May married, April 30, 1882, Margaret Lutz, born in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, the house in which she was born being demolished, with 
others, in preparing a site for the present Union Depot. Children: i. 
Cecelia, born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 4, 1883 ; married A. J. Hauser, 
a funeral director, and resides at No. 414 Chartiers street, McKees Rocks, 
Pennsylvania; she has a daughter, Cecelia, born December ig, igo8. 2. 
John (2), born in Milwaukee, July 25, 1885; now a resident of Akron, 
Ohio, connected with the Goodyear Rubber Company ; he married Alice 
Friend, and has a son, John (3), born May 5, 1913. 

Mrs. May is the daughter of John and Catherine (Keeling) Lutz. her 
father of German birth, her mother a Pennsylvanian. John Lutz was born 
in Cassel, a city of Prussia, capital of the province of Hesse-Nassau, situated 
on both banks of the river Fulda, on May 10, 1824, died in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, March 10, 1897. He was the son of Frederick and Gertrude 
Lutz, who both died in Germany, he a prominent contractor of the city of 
Cassel. John Lutz grew to manhood amid the beautiful surroundings of 
his native city, Cassel, being unsurpassed in its profusion of statues, public 
monuments, art museums and beautiful public gardens. He was an edu- 
cated, trained and capable civil engineer, coming to the United States when 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 711 

a young man, the only member of his family that left their native land. 
He located in Pittsburgh, where he married and became proprietor of the 
American House, which stood on the present site of the Union Depot. He 
remained proprietor of the American House for several years, then moved 
to the South Side, where he was interested in a bank and conducted a coal 
yard until his retirement several years prior to his death at his residence on 
Sarah street. He married Catherine Keeling, born in Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, April 25, 1832, died December 8, 1893, in 
Pittsburgh. She was the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Keeling, both 
born in Prussia and there married. Soon after their marriage Joseph and 
Elizabeth Keeling came to the United States, locating in Greensburg, 
where all their children were born. He was a successful real estate dealer 
for many years, later moving to Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, dying in Pitts- 
burgh, aged seventy-eight years. He was a large land owner, managed 
several farms of his own, but employed men to do the actual work. Prior 
to coming to the United States, Mr. Keeling served in the imperial army. 
Children of John and Catherine (Keeling) Lutz : i. May, married William 
Trimber, whom she survives, a resident of Niles, Ohio. 2. John, a hard- 
ware merchant, on Ophelia street, Pittsburgh. 3. Margaret, widow of John 
May. 4. Frank, superintendent of the Empire Building, Pittsburgh, a resi- 
dent of the South Side. 5. William, died unmarried. 6. Henry, a contractor 
of Pittsburgh. Children of Frederick and Gertrude (Lutz) Keeling (grand- 
parents of Mrs. May) : i. Henry, deceased; was a millionaire coal operator 
and merchant of Greensburg. 2. Gertrude, married Martin Kappler, both 
deceased. 3. Elizabeth, married Joseph Fisher, a brick manufacturer of 
Pittsburgh, North Side. 4. Catherine, married John Lutz (Mrs. May's 
father). 5. Mary, married Joseph Erney, an oil operator and brick manu- 
facturer of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 

Margaret (Lutz) May was educated in the South Side public schools, 
later lived in Chicago, and after her marriage to John May, resided in Mil- 
waukee until his death. She then returned to Pittsburgh, her native city, 
living there until 1899, then erected her present home. No. 2633 Browns- 
ville road, Carrick, Pennsylvania. The May and Lutz families have been 
devoted members of the Roman Catholic Church for many generations, Mr. 
and Mrs. May both communicants of that faith. 



The late Samuel G. Vogeley^ who for many years was one 
VOGELEY of the representative citizens of Mount Oliver, residing 
there for more than two decades, was a descendant of a 
German ancestry, which country has furnished so many of our patriotic 
and public-spirited citizens, men who have been willing to give up their 
lives if necessary for the preservation of the principles of the land of their 
adoption. 

Conrad Vogeley, father of Samuel G. Vogeley. was born in the king- 
dom of Baden, Germany, 18 16, died in Pitt.sburgh, Pennsylvania. 1883. He 



712 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

was reared, educated and learned the trade of shoemaker in his native land, 
which he left upon attaining young manhood, coming to the United States 
and settling in Pittsburgh, on the South Side, at No. loio Bradford street, 
where he spent the remainder of his days. He followed his trade in that 
city, and being a man of industry and thrift was enabled to provide a com- 
fortable home for his family. He was a member of the German Evangeli- 
cal Church. He married, in Pittsburgh, Katherine Snyder, born in the 
kingdom of Baden, Germany, 1821, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1895. 
She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their children 
were: i. Thomas, deceased, was an oil well driller. 2. George, deceased, 
was a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. 3. John, died 1912; he was a glass 
worker; resided on South Side, Pittsburgh. 4. Elizabeth, married George 
Becker, a baker by trade ; both deceased ; they resided on South Side, Pitts- 
burgh. 5. William, an oil operator, resides in Wilkinsburg. 6. Albert, a 
machinist, resides in Beaver Falls. 7. Robert, deceased ; was a glass manu- 
facturer; resided in Beaver Falls. 8. Samuel G., of whom further. 9. 
Sarah, married Benjamin Brown. 10. Edward, an oil merchant, resides in 
East End, Pittsburgh. 

Samuel G. Vogeley was born on Bradford street. South Side, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1859, died in Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania, 
February 7, 1907. He attended the common schools in the vicinity of his 
home, completing his studies at the age of thirteen years. He then entered 
the employ of Adams & Company, glass manufacturers, and was employed 
in the making of glass moulds, and his connection with this company ex- 
tended over a period of thirty years, a record which speaks eloquently for 
his efficiency and trustworthiness. He became an expert in the designing 
of glass ware and lamps, being noted throughout the length and breadth 
of the glass manufacturing district. In 1885 he took up his residence in 
Mount Oliver, locating at No. 119 Arlington avenue, where his death oc- 
curred, and where his widow is living at the present time (1914). He was 
a member of Bingham Street Methodist Episcopal Church, in which his wife 
also holds membership, and he was a staunch adherent of the principles 
of the Republican party. 

Mr. Vogeley married, October i, 1885, Sarah Ella Eicher, born on 
Ninth street. South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and 
Sarah (Clark) Eicher, and they became the parents of four children: i. 
Ralph G., born August 31, 1886; in the employ of the government; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Eaton : resides in Mount Oliver. 2. Clyde E., born January 
24, 1888 : a moulder by trade ; married Eva Reynolds ; resides on Knox 
avenue, Knoxville. 3. Elmer, born May 11, 1891, died 1895. 4. Irene 
Dorothy, born December 2, 1905 ; a student in the schools of Mount Oliver. 

John Eicher, father of Mrs. Vogeley, was born in the Ligonier valley, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1824, died May 22, 
1886. His parents were also natives of Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the father a shoemaker 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 713 

by trade. John Eicher was reared in his native county, educated in the 
common schools, and later learned the trade of making nails. In young 
manhood he removed to i'ittsburgh, locating on the South Side, and in 
that city married Sarah Clark, born in England, (Jctober 27, 1837, died 
March 13, 1910, daughter of Jcdiah Clark, a native of England, a cabinet 
maker by trade, emigrating to this country and locating in Pittsburgh when 
his daughter Sarah was six months old; he died in that city in middle life. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eicher were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and Mr. Eicher served for six months during the latter part of the Civil 
War. Mr. and Mrs. Eicher were the parents of nine children : i. Lydia, mar- 
ried Isaac Ambler; both deceased; resided at Mount Washington, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. Mary Kate, married Thomas D. Thomas, now deceased ; she 
resides in Wilmerding, Pennsylvania. 3. Thomas, a stationary engineer ; 
married Elizabeth Barr; resides in Mount Washington, Pennsylvania. 4. 
Wesley, drowned at age of three years. 5. Joseph Walton, an employee 
of the Westinghouse Electric Company; married Molly Hensel; resides in 
Wilmerding, Pennsylvania. 6. Margaret Elizabeth, married George B. 
Blood ; resides on South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 7. Carrie May, 
married William D. Jones, now deceased ; she resides in Mount Oliver, 
Pennsylvania. 8. Ida Belle, married George Slater, now deceased ; she 
resides in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 9. Sarah Ella, widow of Samuel G. 
Vogeley, aforementioned. 



The name of Kelley is associated in this country and in the 
KELLEY North of Ireland, whence they had migrated during the 

religious persecutions, with honorable records, and they have 
always borne their share bravely in upholding the principles of good govern- 
ment. 

(I) W^illiam Newton Kelley and four brothers — Samuel, John, David 
and James — were born in the North of Ireland, members of a sturdy 
Presbyterian family. In the very early part of the nineteenth century these 
five brothers emigrated to the United States, settled at Philadelphia, and 
there engaged in the contracting business. They constructed a large section 
of the Juniata canal, the old one, also a portion of the original Pennsylvania 
Railroad, west of Philadelphia. William Newton. John and David located 
on farms in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and ^^'illiam Newton also con- 
ducted a large general store. He had the spirit of the true pioneer in him, 
and when Mercer county began to be more thickly settled, it became too 
crowded for his taste, and he removed with his family, with the exception 
of his son John J., to Wisconsin, then a wilderness. There they cleared a 
large farm, and cultivated this successfully. As more settlers came to 
Wisconsin, he removed still farther west, this time taking up land in 
Oregon, but finally returned to his home in Wisconsin, where he died at 
a very advanced age. He was a man of dignified presence, and an extraor- 
dinary amount of executive ability. In all these settlements, he never 



714 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

did any of the labor personally, contenting himself with being the guiding 
spirit of the enterprises. His invariable attire was a dress coat, a stitf 
shirt, a large white choker, and a silk high hat. 

(II) John J. Kelley, son of William Newton Kelley, was born in 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1824, died in 1907. In early manhood he 
removed to Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he learned the trade of 
millwright and carpenter. He then located in Slippery Rock township, 
where he carried on a contracting business along his line of trade. He 
employed a large force of men, and erected almost all of the mills and many 
of the houses in Butler county. During the winter months, when it was 
not possible to carry on outdoor work, he was busied with cabinet making. 
At the time of the Civil War he enlisted in the One, Hundred and Thirty- 
fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, in which he held the 
rank of adjutant. He served about nine months, being obliged to resign 
by reason of ill health. He was an active participant in the battle of 
Antietam, and a number of other important skirmishes, in which he dis- 
played bravery and gallantry. He gave his staunch political support to 
the old-school Democrats, was justice of the peace for many years in later 
life, and was known as "Squire" Kelley. In 1898 he removed to Ellwood 
City, Pennsylvania, and lived there in retirement until his death. 

Mr. Kelley married Elvira Leech, born in Mercer county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1828, died in 1908. John Leech, her grandfather, was of English 
birth, and came to America long before the Revolution, where he was 
among the first to settle in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and died at the 
age of ninety-eight years. Morris, son of John Leech, lived near Clarks- 
ville, Mercer county, where he was the owner of a general store and a 
large farm. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church; he died at the 
age of seventy-five years. He married, and had children : Elvira, mention- 
ed above ; Bertha, married Rev. John Morton, a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley have had children : 
I. Morris Leech, of further mention. 2. William N., proprietor of the 
Mispah Restaurant, in Philadelphia, where he lives; married Sarah Hop- 
kins. 3. Maria, married Fremont Dennis, an oil operator, lives in Texas. 
4. Ellen, died unmarried. 5. Clara, married John Walker, stationer ; lives 
at Erie, Pennsylvania. 6. Delos Morton, went to the Klondike in the gold- 
rush, and died there. 7. Franklin, lives at Detroit, Michigan, where he is 
the proprietor of a restaurant. 8. Harriet, married Joseph Richards, a 
railroad man, and lives at East Pittsburgh. 

(III) Morris Leech Kelley, son of John J. and Elvira (Leech) Kel- 
ley, was born in Slippery Rock township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, 
December 30, 1849. At first he attended the public schools of his native 
township, and this training was supplemented by a course at a then popular 
academy at Dunkirk, New York. Upon the completion of his school 
education he took up the carpenter's trade under the able supervision and 
teaching of his father, and during the winter of his eighteenth year came 





crn^^ 




Cly 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 7x5 

to Pittsburgh and worked in the drug store of L. II. White, at No. 187 
Federal street, continuing this for three winters. In this manner he ob- 
tained a practical working knowledge of the drug business which he could 
have obtained in no other way so thoroughly. During the summers of 
these years he worked for his father in the carpentering business. The 
next two years were spent in association with his father, in the oil fields 
of Armstrong and Venango counties, where they filled contracts for the 
erection of oil rigs, hotels, and other building which this section demanded 
at the time. In the course of ten years Mr. Kelley had amassed a con- 
siderable fortune, and then purchased a drug store at Slippery Rock, 
Pennsylvania, and conducted this four years. In 1887 he removed to 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he purchased the drug store of B. E. 
Pric'hard, on the Market House corner, and was very successful in his 
conduct of this. In December, 1912, he erected a fine three-story brick 
building on Market street, covering a ground space of forty by seventy 
feet, and had this fitted up in the most modern manner. There are two 
stores on the ground floor and apartments above these. The drug store 
of Mr. Kelley occupies one-half of the lower floor, and is the best suppHed 
store of its kind in this section of the state. The fraternal affiliation of 
Mr. Kelley is as follows : Youghiogheny Lodge, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; McKeesport Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; McKeesport Command- 
ery, Knights Templar ; Pittsburgh Consistory, Scottish Rite ; Syria Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine ; McKeesport Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In the winter of 1911-12, Mr. Kelley 
and his wife made a trip around the world on the "Cleveland," touching 
at many countries, and consuming four months on the journey. 

Mr. Kelley married (first) in August, 1873, Sophie Kiester, born in 
Slippery Rock township, Butler county, Pennsylvania, died in i88g, a 
daughter of John and Sophie Kiester, the former a farmer, and both 
now deceased. He married (second) in October, 1893, Sarah, born at 
Elizabeth, Pennsylvania, died in 1907, a daughter of Frank and Mary 
Toryson, the former a Civic War veteran. He married (third) in August, 
1908, Catherine Riley, a native of Pittsburgh. Children by first marriage: 
I. Rena Florence, married Curtis Coyle, proprietor of a general store at 
Cornersburg, Ohio. 2. Charles N., a druggist of Pittsburgh ; married 
Margaret Campbell. 3. Ella, married R. Joseph Trimble ; lives at West 
Side, Pittsburgh. 4. Clara V., married Edward Wall Smith, a salesman ; 
lives at Allegheny. 5. Frances V., married William Robison ; lives in 
Atlantic City, New Jersey. 6. Lester, a surveyor in the employ of the 
state. 7. John K., a resident of Philadelphia. 8. Benjamin F.. unmarried, 
is in partnership with his father, Morris Leech Kelley. By the second 
marriage there was one child : ]\Iorris Thayer, now seventeen years of 
age, who attends college. 



7i6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The Rosensteels came to Franklin township, AUe- 
ROSENSTEEL gheny county, Pennsylvania, from Germany, Jacob 

and Catherine (Verner) Rosensteel marrying in Ger- 
many and coming to that township prior to the year 1800. Jacob Rosen- 
steel bought one hundred and fifty acres of timber land of Judge Wilkins, 
cleared a farm and there resided until death. Jacob Rosensteel came to 
America prior to the Revolution and served in the American army during 
that war, losing an eye in battle. It was not until later in Hfe that he 
settled in Franklin township. Children: Andrew, Philip, Joseph, Fred- 
erick, Hannah, Dorothy, Lavinia. 

(IIj Andrew Rosensteel, son of Jacob Rosensteel, the Revolutionary 
soldier, was born shortly after the settlement in FrankHn township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. He there grew to manhood and after his 
marriage became the owner of fifty acres of the original homestead farm, 
purchasing from his father at the price of one dollar per acre. This old 
farm was held in the Rosensteel name from about 1800 until 1909. Andrew 
Rosensteel married Nancy McDonald, born in Pennsylvania, daughter of 
William and Mary (Wright) McDonald, her father born in Scotland, 
her mother born in Ireland. William and Mary McDonald came to the 
United States prior to the Revolution and settled in Harden county, Ohio, 
after the war was over. William McDonald was a Revolutionary soldier, 
serving in the cavalry, furnishing his own horses. He entered the service 
with three horses, one of them surviving and returning with him from the 
war. The family did not remain in Ohio, but later returned to Pennsyl- 
vania. Children of William and Mary (Wright) McDonald: Alexander, 
William, Joseph, James, died in the Union army during the Civil War; 
Mary Ann, married a Mr. Young; Nancy, married Andrew Rosensteel; 

Jane; and Prudence, married Winters. Andrew and Mary (McDonald) 

Rosensteel had issue : Catherine, Hannah, William, Jacob. Alexander, 
Andrew (2), of further mention, Jane, Matilda, Crawford Boggs. Two 
of the sons, Jacob and Alexander, were Union soldiers, serving in the 
Civil War. 

(Ill) Andrew (2) Rosensteel, son of Andrew (i) and Nancy (Mc- 
Donald) Rosensteel, was born in Franklin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, at the Rosensteel homestead, February 28, 1847. He lived 
with his parents, engaged in farming until his marriage in 1868, then 
in 1869 built bis present residence and barn, the present one being the 
second one that has sheltered his stock and crops. Mr. Rosensteel was 
formerly a Presbyterian, but when the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Hopkins Corners was abandoned, he organized a Sunday school, of which 
he has been superintendent for nine years. Through his eflForts in main- 
taining a live Sunday school the church was reorganized and is again under 
charge of the Methodist Episcopal Church conference. During the 
nine years he has been superintendent he has been at his post 
every Sunday with two exceptions. He is a Republican in politics and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 717 

has served his township as justice of the peace, school director and super- 
visor. 

Mr. Rosenstecl married, in i'ebruary, 1866, Mary D., daughter of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Duff) Wood. Samuel Wood, born in New Jersey, 
came to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, when a young man and for sev- 
eral years taught school during the winter months and farmed during the 
summer time. He married Elizabeth Duff, born on the Duff homestead, 
now occupied in part by Andrew Rosensteel. She was a daughter of David 
and Margaret (Mears) Duff, her father a miller and farmer. David 
Duff patented the tract, originally containing two hundred acres, heavily 
timbered. He erected a mill^ house and barns, cleared a large part of the 
farm and there resided until death. He was known as "Squire Duff" from 
the fact that he was justice of the peace, and was everywhere held in the 
highest esteem. He was kindly hearted and generous, responding to every 
demand upon his sympathy. He prospered abundantly and is remembered 
in Pittsburgh by Duff's Business College, named in his honor, his activi- 
ties extending to that city. Children : Elizabeth, Ware, Mary, Nancy, 
Lavina, James, Thomas, William. Children of Samuel and Elizabeth (Duff) 
Wood: Mary D., wife of Andrew (2) Rosensteel; Thomas, David and 
William. Parents and children were members of the Presbyterian Church. 
Children of Andrew and Mary D. (Wood) Rosensteel: i. Walter, now 
an oil well worker on the Hague farm in Franklin township. 2. David W., 
of Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 3. Gilbert A., of Butler county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Edna Blanche, deceased. 



With the early settlement in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
CROOKS vania, of Henry Crooks, this record begins. He was the 
owner of a large tract of land, which he cleared and culti- 
vated, also holding title to property the cultivation or improvement of 
which he did not attempt. Both he and his wife held membership in the 
Presbyterian Church, of which he was an elder for many years. He was 
thrice married, a Miss Roseberry his second wife, Elizabeth Donaldson 
his third, being the father of several children by his first marriage and of 
three by his third. The last were: i. Elizabeth, married Robert Farrar, 
a farmer, and died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 2. Andrew, 
died in Iowa. 3. Henry Richard, of whom further. 

(II) Henry Richard Crooks, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Donaldson) 
Crooks, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, died in McDonald, 
Pennsylvania, about 1907, being buried in Candor, Pennsylvania. He was 
reared in the county of his birth, and after his marriage made his home 
on the homestead of his wife's family, caring for her parents in their old 
age and managing a hotel of which the Walker's were the proprietor?. 
After the death of his wife's father he returned to Washington county, 
his wife having also died in her old home, and there married a second time, 
living on a portion of the old Crooks homestead. After a few years he 



7i8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

retired and moved to McDonald, where he directed the erection of a modern 
and handsomely appointed residence, where he lived until his death, his 
widow surviving him to the present time. His faith was that of his father, 
she also belonging to the Presbyterian Church, and politically he was a loyal 
Republican. He married (first) Hannah Walker, born on the Steubenville 
pike, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph and Sarah Ann 
Walker, her parents residents of Allegheny county, her father the owner 
of an extensive tract of land and the proprietor of a tavern on the Steuben- 
ville pike. They were Presbyterians in religion. They had children: i. 
2. and 3. Rebecca, Anna Mary, and Sarah, all died in young womanhood, 
between the ages of twenty and thirty years. 4. Hannah, of previous men- 
tion, married Henry Richard Crook. 5. Isaac, died near the homestead 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 6. Joseph, died in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. Children of the first marriage of Henry Richard Crooks : 
I. Andrew, a retired farmer, lives in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. 2. Dorcas, 
died aged eighteen years. 3. Henry Richard (2), of whom further. Children 
of the second marriage of Henry Richard Crooks : 4. Ariel, married James 
Reeder, and resides at Hughesville, Pennsylvania. 5. Francis, lives with 
his widowed mother at McDonald, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Henry Richard (2) Crooks,, son of Henry Richard (i) and 
Hannah (Walker) Crooks, was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
September 30, 1855, died in Oakdale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 
5, 1905. He was educated in Geneva College. He inherited one hundred 
and sixty-five acres of the maternal homestead in young manhood and be- 
came a farmer in North Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
This occupation he followed for eight years, in 1891 retiring to Oakdale, 
Pennsylvania, where his death occvirred. He was a communicant of the 
United Presbyterian Church, as is his wife, and was a strong Republican 
sympathizer. 

He married, April 3, 1883, Sarah Agnes (Sadie) Mevey, born in North 
Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 22, 1858, daughter 
of Samuel Pryor and Sarah (Donehoo) Mevey. Samuel Pryor Mevey was 
a son of Benjamin Alexander (2) Mevey, who was a son of Benjamin Alex- 
ander (i) Mevey. Benjamin Alexander (i) Mevey was a native of Mary- 
land, and with his wife. Prudence (Pryor) Mevey, born in the same state, 
came to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century, purchasing land from the Penn heirs, a tract of about three hundred 
acres. The most primitive conditions of life prevailed in that locality at 
the time, the pioneer settler encountering discouraging difficulties in secur- 
ing desired supplies, both for daily use and in the improvement of his land, 
and more serious still, braving all manner of danger from violence at the 
hand of savage beasts and men. His cabin occupied a site opposite the 
present Mevey home, and there he and his wife died, both being buried in 
the Robinson Cemetery. He was a founder of the Presbyterian Church 
at McDonald, and served that organization as elder for a long time. Chil- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 719 

dreii of iienjaniin Alexander (ij and i'rudence ( I'ryor j Mevey : i. Ben- 
jamin Alexander, of whom further. 2. Prudence, married James \analta, 
and died at Half Crown Run, Pennsylvania. 

Benjamin Alexander {2) Mevey, son of Benjamin Alexander (i; and 
Prudence (Pryor) Mevey, was born on the homestead near McDonald, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there died, in 1866. He was reared 
in this place, and upon the death of his father inherited the homestead, 
there erecting a brick house of curious design, fashioned after the Mary- 
land home of the family. He mairied Margaret Elizabeth Donaldson, 
whose death preceded his by many years, although he never married a 
second time. Both were members of the United Presbyterian Church. 
They had children: i. Jane Scott, died unmarried, aged eighty-three years. 
2. Samuel Pryor, of whom further. 3. Benjamin Franklin, proprietor of 
a livery in Pittsburgh, where he died. 4. James, died on the homestead, 
unmarried. 5. Margaret D., married William Clark, and died in Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania. 6. Martha M., married Dr. William Sarver, and died 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel Pryor Mevey, son of Benjamin Alexander (2) and Margaret 
Elizabeth (Donaldson) Mevey, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 6, 1824, died in 1872. After his marriage he made his home 
on a farm six miles from Oakdale, in North Fayette township, Allegheny 
county, inherited from his paternal grandfather, and there lived until his 
death. He married (first) Sarah, born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1828. daughter of Master and Sarah (McElhaney) Donehoo, her father 
a school teacher, her mother, after the death of her husband, moving to 
Beaver, Pennsylvania, making her home with her sons; (second) Mrs. 
Elizabeth Pollock. Both he and his wife were members of the United 
Presbyterian Church. Children of Master and Sarah (McElhaney) Don- 
ehoo: I. Harry, a veteran of the Civil War, died in the Old Soldiers' Home, 
at Dayton, Ohio. 2. Daniel, a veteran of the war between the states, died 
in Beaver, Pennsylvania. 3. Frank, a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil War, was killed in that conflict. 4. Nancy, died aged twenty years. 
5. Sarah, of previous mention, married Samuel Pryor Mevey. 6. Isabel, 
married James Caughey, and died in Beaver, Pennsylvania. Children of 
Samuel Pryor and Sarah (Donehoo) Mevey: i. Mary, died in infancy. 
2. Isabella Jane, married Byron Townley, and died in Nebraska. 3. Sarali 
Agnes, of previous mention, married Henry Richard Crooks, was educated 
in the Oakdale Academy and in the Indiana State Normal School, teaching 
for two years prior to her marriage. 4. Benjamin Alexander, a farmer of 
Missouri. 5. Mary E., married Vincent Gibson, deceased, and resides in 
Erie, Pennsylvania. 6. James, died aged eighteen years. Children of Henry 
Richard and Sarah Agnes (Mevey) Crooks: i. Cora Donehoo. married 
Norman B. Hoiifman, and lives in Beaver. Pennsylvania, the mother of one 
daughter, Sarah Agnes. 2. Bella Elizabeth, married Robert Robinson, and 
resides in Oakdale, Pennsylvania ; they have one son, Howard Crooks. 3. 
Sarah Agnes, lives with her mother. 



720 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Naaman {2) Freeman, deceased, a worthy respected citi- 
FREEMAN zen of Oakdale, Pennsylvania for many years, was a son 

of Naaman (i) and Margaret Ann Freeman. The Free- 
mans were of EngHsh birth and parentage, Naaman (i) coming to the 
United States when a young man, his wife from Ireland. They met and 
married in this country and soon afterward settled on a farm of fifty acres, 
on which the borough of Homestead now stands in part. He named his 
farm ''Homestead" and when the village was started there it was given the 
original name of the Freeman Farm and called Homestead. He was a 
devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, held high official posi- 
tion, was deeply concerned in the welfare of the church and threw his house 
open wide for the entertainment of traveling ministers. He was held in 
high esteem in his community and looked up to as a leader. His death was 
sincerely mourned. By his request both he and his wife were entombed 
in a vault, but after several attempts had been made to rob the vault, the 
bodies were removed to the Homestead Methodist Episcopal Cemetery. 
Children : Mary, married an Allen and died in Homestead ; Alma, married 
Thomas Garvey, and died in Homestead ; William, died in Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsylvania ; Margaret Ann, married Robert Young, and died in Bellevue ; 
Naaman, of further mention ; Susan Agnes, married George Bennett, and 
died in Bellevue, Pennsylvania. 

Naaman (2) Freeman, youngest son of Naaman (i) and Margaret 
Ann Freeman, was born on what is now Homestead, Pennsylvania, April 
17. 1839, died in Oakdale, Pennsylvania, February i, 1898. He attended 
public school and lived on the homestead until orphaned, then was taken 
under the care of his brother William. He grew to youthful manhood a 
farmer, then began working in the steel mills of Moorehead & McClean, 
at Pittsburgh, continuing with them from 1859 until 1894, the only breaks 
being his eleven months' military service, and a period of six months he 
was with the Whittaker Steel Mill in Wheeling, West Virginia. He be- 
came an expert steel roller, standing high in the estimation of his employers 
and in the regard of his fellow workmen. He resided in Pittsburgh, 1859 
to 1870, then moved to Oakdale where he purchased seven acres on the edge 
of the then village. As the village grew his land became valuable and now 
the entire seven acres is included in the prosperous borough of Oakdale. 
He first built a small house on his land, but as prosperity came he built a 
larger one on Western avenue, now the residence of his widow. He en- 
listed in 1864 in Company F, Sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, 
serving until the close of the war. His duty was principally in Washington, 
D. C, being there stationed on the night of President Lincoln's assassina- 
tion and was with the party of soldiers sent in pursuit of the assassin. He 
was an active Republican, a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and a man highly respected. 

Mr. Freeman married, June 16, i860, Pamela Palmer, born in Stafford- 
shire. England, April 20, 1844, daughter of John and Mary (Bisliop) 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 721 

(Roddy) Palmer, both born in England. John and Mary Palmer came to 
the United States in 1851, bringing their daughter I'amela. They settled 
on a farm near Red Bank, Pennsylvania, but after about five years there, 
moved to Oakdale where John Palmer died in 1871, aged eighty-two years; 
his wife died in July, 1881, at age of eighty-two years. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, she of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
Mary Bishop was a widow at the time of her marriage to John Palmer. Her 
first husband, Robert Roddy, was a soldier under Lord Wellington, fought 
at the battle of Waterloo, losing a leg in that battle, and having eight 
brothers killed. He was also wounded in the head, but recovered. By 
Robert Roddy she had seven children, all of whom died in England except 
Mrs. Ann Winters who died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Children of 
Naaman (2) and Pamela (Palmer) Freeman: i. Charles Everett, now a 
steel roller, residing in Carrick, Pennsylvania. 2. Mary Frances, married 
John Wilkinson, and resides in Akron, Ohio. 3. Naaman (3), died August 
21, 1900. 4. WilHam, a steel roller, of Pittsburgh. 5. Virginia Agnes, died 
in infancy. 6. Virginia, married C. C. Brown, and resides in Columbus, 
Ohio. 7. John, an oil pumper, resides at home, unmarried. 8. Samuel 
McKneeland, an oil pumper of Burgettstown, Pennsylvania. 9. George 
F. McClean, twin of Samuel M., a railroad employee of Eurichsville, Ohio. 
10. Agnes May, died in infancy. 11. Mabel, died aged twenty-one years. 
12. Alma Pamela, a stenographer, resides in Pittsburgh. 13. Margaret, 
married Henry Metz, and resides at Elizabeth, Ohio. 14. Katherine Agnes, 
a teacher, resides with her mother in Oakdale. 



This is an old and honored family of Hesse-Darm- 
REICHENBACH stadt, Germany, who first came to this country in 

the middle of the nineteenth century, the immigrant 
ancestor residing in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, until his 
death. 

(H) Ernest Frederick Reichenbach, who was born in Hesse-Darm- 
stadt, Germany, in 1845, died in March, 1904. He was a very young child 
when brought to this country by his parents, and his educational oppor- 
tunities were very limited. Nevertheless, being ambitious, bright and 
shrewd, he overcame these disadvantages as the years passed by. At the 
age of twelve years he was apprenticed to learn the trade of brewing, and by 
the time he had attained middle age he was the owaier of a fine brewery 
in McKeesport. Later he conducted a hotel, but retired to private life a 
few years prior to his death. He married Catherine Hartman, born in 
McKeesport, in 1848, died in May, 1904. She was a daughter of William 
Hartman and his wife, both natives of Germany, who came to the United 
States about 1850 and located in McKeesport, in the First ward, where 
he had a shoe shop, and worked at this trade for many years. Later he 
removed to Fifth avenue, where he continued his business until his death. 
He and his wife were of the German Lutheran faith. Mr. and Mrs. 



722 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Reichenbach had children : Mayme, married Henry Hoffman, and lived in 
McKeesport; Charles N., of further mention; Millie, unmarried, lives in 
Pittsburgh; George, died in 191 1; Albert, a furniture dealer, lives on 
Penney avenue, McKeesport; Anna, unmarried; Edwin, a plumber, lives 
in McKeesport. 

(HI) Charles N. Reichenbach, son of Ernest Frederick and Catherine 
(Hartman) Reichenbach, was born in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 17, 1873. He attended the public schools of his native 
town until he had attained the age of eighteen years, then learned the horse- 
shoeing trade in the shop of C. W. Holt, and worked for Mr. Holt for 
about eight years, after which he became his partner. This association 
continued five years, when Mr. Reichenbach bought out Mr. Holt's interest 
in this enterprise, and for one year conducted it alone. In 1906 he took 
as a partner Frank Drake, and the firm is still known as Reichenbach & 
Drake. They have a large shop at No. 607 Strawberry street, and their 
business is an extensive one. Mr. Reichenbach owns a comfortable house 
at No. 126 Sixth avenue. He is a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. He married, June 9, 1902, Jane Woolrich, born in South Stafford- 
shire, England, January 3, 1880, (see Woolrich III), and they have chil- 
dren : Gertrude Elizabeth, born July 6, 1903 ; Charles Blose, born January 
7, 1907. 

(The Woolrich Line.) 

(I) Samuel Woolrich, who was a farmer in Shropshire, England, was 
a soldier in the English army, and fought at the famous battle of Waterloo 
under General Wellington. 

(II) Samuel (2) Woolrich, son of Samuel (i) Woolrich, was born 
near Salisbury, England, in 1825, died in 1865. In his earlier years he 
held office as a tax collector, then became a lime burner in Staffordshire. 
Later he was in the general contracting business, and constructed a num- 
ber of canals, railroads, highways, etc. At the time of his death he had 
amassed a considerable fortune. He and his wife were members of the 
Church of England. He married Sarah Smith, a sister of Joseph Smith, 
who died in New Jersey; Isaac and Abraham Smith, who were in the steel 
business and died in England. She was born in South Staffordshire, Eng- 
land, in 1825, died January i, i860. They had children, all the elder ones 
receiving fine educations prior to the death of their father : Mary, married 
William Thompson, both died in England ; Richard, who was superintendent 
at a steel spring balance works, died at the age of sixty-eight years, m 
March, 1914; William, a retail coal merchant for the past thirty years, lives 
in West Bronwick, South Staffordshire, England, and married Mary 
Smith; Ellen, married Allen Marckum, in the employ of the Tube Works, 
at Troy, New York ; Elizabeth, died at the age of eighteen years ; Samuel, 
of further mention. 

(III) Samuel (3) Woolrich, son of Samuel (2) and Sarah (Smith) 
Woolrich, was born in West Bronwick, South Staffordshire, England, June 




/J.n ^' '.OU, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 723 

13, 1853. He was a young lad at the time of the death of his father, and 
lived with his elder brother until he was fifteen years old, and after that 
with his maternal aunt, Mrs. Abraham Smith. In 1879 he emigrated to 
America, went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and then for a time resided 
at New Lisbon, Ohio, where he worked as a coal miner. In England he 
had learned and worked at the trade of making steel balance springs. In 
1880 he sent for his wife and family, and in 1894 he took up his residence 
in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he has since lived. 
He is still weighmaster in the Camden Mines. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married Susanna Holt, born 
March 19, 1858, and they have had children : Jane, who married Mr. Reichen- 
bach (see Reichenbach III) ; Samuel, lives in Dravosburg, Pennsylvania, 3 
machine boss, married Laura Lynn ; Maud S., married Edward Reichen- 
bach, lives in McKeesport ; William, a moulder, married Flora Lynn, lives 
in Homestead; Elizabeth, married W. W. Hinchman, lives in McKeesport; 
Gertrude, married Harry Brown, lives at Homestead Park. 



John P. Gelm, for many years a resident of Braddock, Penn- 
GELM sylvania, and proprietor of the Hotel Gelm, was born in the 

north of Sweden, July 24, 1853, died in Braddock, Pennsylvania, 
July 24, 1899. He was the son of Swedish parents, his father a farmer. 
John P. Gelm in boyhood worked on a farm and came to the United 
States from Finland, where he lived part of his youth. He was little more 
than a boy when he came to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where on first 
coming he worked in the tube mill, becoming foreman, continuing in that 
occupation until 1882, when he moved to Braddock. He there bought an 
old hotel property, which he rebuilt, named the Hotel Gelm, and this hoteJ 
he successfully conducted until his death. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church. He was a Republican. He 
married Caroline (Simon) Stein, born in Dermbach, Saxe- Weimar, 
Germany, August 4, 1853, died in Braddock, Pennsylvania, at her home, Xo. 
450 Fourth street, November 14, 1913. Her father, Balthasar Simon, a 
veteran German soldier and a farmer, died in 1909, aged eighty-four years. 
Caroline Simon came to the United States when a girl and later married 
Andreas Stein, who died a few years later, leaving a son, Charles Stein, 
who died December 13, 191 1, aged thirty-three years, a baker by trade. 
Caroline, the widow, continued her residence in Braddock, where in 1883 
she married John P. Gelm. They jointly conducted the Hotel Gelm until 
the husband's death in 1899, and for one year after being widowed a sec- 
ond time ]\Irs. Gelm continued its management. In 1900 she sold out, 
purchased a house at No. 450 Fourth avenue, Braddock, and there lived 
a retired life, devoted to good works, until 1906. William J. Gelm. the 
eldest son, to whom she had leased the hotel, died February 26, 1906, and 
as Mrs. Caroline Gelm yet had considerable money invested in the hotel 
she was compelled to again assume its management, so continuing until 



724 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a short time prior to her death, November 14, 191 3. She was a devout 
member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church and devoted to church and 
•charitable work. She was chairman of the poor committee that maintains 
soup houses in times of public distress, was a member of the L. C. B. A., 
the Ladies' Auxiliary, the Hospital Committee and a leader in the Woman's 
Societies of the church. During her latter years she devoted most of her 
time to charitable work and was the "Lady Bountiful" to the poor of the 
city. She was quiet and unostentatious in her work, but was well known and 
greatly beloved. She was possessed of considerable means, owning prop- 
erty in Braddock, North Braddock and Copeland. Her life was a useful 
one and her memory is warmly cherished. She has two sisters living, Mrs. 
Bertha Sterf, a widow, and Augusta, residing in Germany. 

John P. Gelm was the eldest of four children. His eldest sister, Anna, 
married William Johnson, a railroad foreman, and resides at Oak Ridge, 
Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. A second sister. Alma, married a Mr. 
Nelson and resides in Jamestown, New York, a widow. His only brother, 
Eric, resides in Finland, a wealthy retired farmer. Children of John P. 
and Caroline (Simon-Stein) Gelm: i. Barbara, deceased. 2. John J., 
born March 11, 1885; educated in St. Joseph's Parochial School, Braddock, 
Pennsylvania ; he was variously engaged until he purchased the Hotel 
Gelm and is its present proprietor ; he married, June 20, 1906, Rose M. 
McCaffrey, and has three children: Josephine Caroline, born March 17, 
1907; John Joseph, August i, 1909; David, June 20, 191 1. 3. Henry J., 
of further mention. 4. Anna, married John McAtee, and resides at the 
old home. No. 450 Fourth avenue, Braddock. Several other children who 
died in infancy. 

Henry J. Gelm, second son of John P. and Caroline (Simon-Stein) 
Gelm. was born in Braddock, Pennsylvania, December 10, 1886. He pre- 
pared for college in St. Joseph's Parochial School and then entered Saint 
Vincent's College, near Latrobe, Pennsylvania, one of the famous educa- 
tional institutions of the Catholic church. Here he was graduated Bachelor 
of Arts, Class of 191 1, and began the study of law the same year at 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh. He pursued a three years' course of 
legal study at the university, in 1914 was graduated LL.B. and admitted to 
the Allegheny county bar. He began practice at once in Braddock and is 
winning his way to a good practice. He married, September 15, 1914, Marie 
Schaming, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



Anciently a part of a powerful Scottish Highland clan 
McBROOM and faithful to the cause of the Stuarts, the McBrooms, 
brave, hardy, powerful and warlike, ruled the country- 
side. Later when the march of time brought more peaceful, civilized con- 
siderations they became farmers, generally, although many were iron 
workers and many were employed in the ship-building trades in Glasgow. 
The family was a numerous one and devoted to one another to an unusual 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 725 

degree. William Dixon McBroom, now deceased, but for many years a 
familiar figure in the I'itt^burgli district, was the second of his immediate 
family to come to the United States ; he had two brothers and a sister who 
also came to this country, John, a pit boss in Western Pennsylvania coal 
mines; Gilbert, a sheet mill worker at Homestead and Turtle Creek, (both 
deceased) ; Margaret, married Richard Rowley. These three, with Wil- 
liam D. McBroom, were the only ones of the sixteen children of Hugh Mc- 
Broom who left their native Scotland for a home in the western world. 
Hugh McBroom and his wife, Ellen, were both born in Scotland and there 
passed their entire lives, their home being in Ayr and Glasgow. 

William Dixon McBroom was born in Ayr, Scotland, December 29, 
1841, died in Homestead, Pennsylvania, March 23, 1905, son of Hugh and 
Ellen McBroom. He spent his early life in Glasgow and Ayr, obtained a 
fairly good education, and in Glasgow learned his trade of boiler maker in 
the machine shops at the shipyards, engaged in building trans-Atlantic 
steamships. He remained in Glasgow until 1863, becoming an expert worker 
and commanding good wages. In his twenty-second year, 1863, he sailed 
for the United States, finally reaching Western Pennsylvania and locating 
in what is now Pittsburgh West End. He obtained remunerative employ- 
ment in Pittsburgh shops, and nine months after his arrival sent funds home 
to bring his wife and only sorj, who was then five months old, to him. He 
later moved his residence to Carnegie, Pennsylvania, where he availed him- 
self of the demand for mine workers and for a few years followed that 
unlovely but profitable occupation. In 1882 he resumed work at his trade, 
boiler maker, in the steel mills at Homestead. After a few years he re- 
tired from manual labor, was chosen constable, and until 1894 was em- 
ployed as a civil officer of the town. From 1894 until 1899 he was pro- 
prietor of a hotel on Eighth avenue, Homestead, then retired from all busi- 
ness cares and lived a quiet home life until his death at his residence, 808 
McClure street, which he erected in J898. He was a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, Knights of Pythias, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and in political faith a Republi- 
can. He was a man of high standing in his circle of acquaintance, industri- 
ous and thrifty, and mindful of his duties as a good citizen, husband and 
father. 

Mr. McBroom married, in 1862, in Glasgow, Scotland, Margaret 
Chalmers, born in that city, August 2, 1842, died in Homestead, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 28, 1913, daughter of John and Mary (Barr) Chalmers. John 
Chalmers, a shoe merchant of Glasgow, met his death in the river Clyde, 
in 1865, by accidental drowning. His widow, Mary (Barr) Chalmers, then 
joined her daughter, Mrs. John Brown, in the United States, but after a 
few years returned to Scotland, where she died. Children of Tohn 
Chalmers: i. Jane, married William Gilchrist, now a retired farmer at 
Pacific Grove, California. 2. \\'illiam, a retired blacksmith, now residing 
in Bridgeport, Connecticut, aged seventy-seven years. 3. Elizabeth, mar- 



726 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ried John Brown, now a retired farmer living in San Francisco, California. 
4. Margaret, married William Dixon McBroom. 5. John, a candy manu- 
facturer of Coatbridge, Scotland. Children of William Dixon McBroom: 
I. John C, married Frances Roberts, of New York. 2. Mary B., of further 
mention, 3. Margaret, married Daniel Williams, and resides in Detroit, 
Michigan. 4. Ellen, married Harry Layman, of Homestead. 5. William, 
a hotel proprietor of Homestead, married Elizabeth Dale. 6. Gilbert, a 
hotel proprietor of Homestead, married Kate Haines. 7. Jane, married 
August Meister, of Homestead Park, now with the Carnegie Steel Mills. 
8. W^alter Robinson, died young. 

Mary B. McBroom, daughter of William Dixon and Margaret 
(Chalmers) McBroom, married Andrew Hallas, born in Elizabeth, Penn- 
sylvania, December 19, 1865, son of William and Hannah (Richie) Hallas, 
the former of whom came to the United States at the age of seven years. 
William Hallas had two brothers, George and Daniel, who enUsted in the 
Union army and Daniel never came back. His sisters lived in England 
and he never heard from them. His wife, Hannah (Richie) Hallas, was 
born in Butler county, Pennsylvania. 

Andrew Hallas worked in the coal mines for several years, then located 
in Homestead, where he worked in the steel mills until 1886, then became 
shear boss in the Carnegie mills. After the death of W^illiam Dixon Mc- 
Broom, Mr. and Mrs. Hallas made their home with his widow, Mrs. Hallas's 
mother, at the homestead on McClure street, and there continue their resi- 
dence. Mrs. McBroom died there in April, 1913. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hallas 
are members of the First Baptist Church of Homestead, Mr. Hallas be- 
longing also to the Junior Order of American Mechanics and Heptasophs. 
He is the oldest child of his parents and has brothers and sisters: i. Daniel, 
deceased. 2. John, a coal miner, married Bertha Hartzell, and resides in 
Elizabeth, Pennsylvania. 3. Nannie, married Stanley Davidson, a draughts- 
man, residing at Columbus. 4. William, an electrician, residing in Alliance, 
Ohio, married Elizabeth Smeltzer. 5. Benjamin, a steel mill worker of 

Steubenville, Ohio, married Maude . 6. Dudley, a steel mill worker 

of Middletown, Ohio. 7. Daisy, married Thomas Flaherty, and resides in 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 8. Mary, married Russell Huntsberger, a steel 
mill worker of Middletown, Ohio. Andrew and Mary B. (McBroom.) 
Hallas have two sons: i. William Dixon, born March 2, 1889, now a travel- 
ing salesman. 2. Walter Robinson, born April 10, 1893, now residing and 
employed in Detroit, Michigan. 



The Huch family were for many generations native to the 
HUGH city of Gottingen, province of Hanover, the capital of the 

province. Here Gerhardt Dietrich Huch, born in 1808, grew 
to manhood, was educated in the schools for which Gottingen is famed, 
married in 1829, Sophia Haupt, and lived until the birth of their ninth child 
and the death of three. They then, in 1838, came to the United States, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 727 

landing in New York. The family spent several years in that city, then 
came to Western Pennsylvania, settling on a farm at Squirrel Hill, Alle- 
gheny county, now part of the city of Pittsburgh. Later they moved to 
Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side), their home site now being oc- 
cupied by the store of Boggs & Buhl. There Gerhardt D. Huch kept a 
road house, later purchasing a farm of sixty-five acres in Ross township, 
Allegheny county. He died in 1855, his wife surviving him until 1858, the 
mother of fifteen children. There are living today forty grandchildren ar.d 
eighty-four great-grandchildren of Gerhardt D. and Sophia (Haupt) Huch. 

John Henry Huch, son of Gerhardt Dietrich Huch, was born in Ger- 
many in 1836, and two years later was brought to the United States by 
his parents. He was educated in public schools, and spent his mature life 
as a farmer and market gardener. He began farming on the paternal farm 
in Ross township, Allegheny county, later moving to another farm in the 
same township. Later he moved to McCandless township and for seven 
years conducted a road house on the Perrysville road. Later he leased the 
hotel and cultivated a farm of one hundred and twenty-four acres. 

He married, November 22, 1866, Caroline Goss, born in Manchester, 
Pennsylvania, October 20, 1847, daughter of Jacob and Emelia (Bitten- 
bring) Goss, he of Swiss and she of German parentage, both born in Ger- 
many. Her paternal grandfather, Jacob Goss, came to Manchester from 
Germany with his family and there died. Emelia Goss was a daughter 
of Christian Bittenbring, whose wife died in Germany two days before the 
date set for their departure for the United States. Later he came to this 
country and died at the home of his daughter, Emelia. Jacob Goss ( father) 
came to the United States when twelve years of age and located in yian- 
chester, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there spent his life, a gardener, 
owning a small tract of land on which his widowed daughter, Caroline Huch, 
now reside. He married (first) a Miss Trizzell and had issue: jNIargaret, 
Mary, Eliza, Sarah, John Jacob. He married (second) Emelia Bittenbring, 
who bore him Christian and Caroline, the latter widow of John Henry 
Huch. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Huch: i. Henry, deceased. 2. Jacob, of 
Butler county, Pennsylvania. 3. Emelia. 4. Charles, of McCandless town- 
ship. 5. John. 6. Albert. 7. William, of Wexford, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 8. Carrie. Mrs. Huch has been a lifelong member of 
Smithfield Street Presbyterian Church (Pittsburgh), was there married, 
her parents both members of that church. John Henry Huch died May 5, 
1906. 



The name of Pfirrmann is one of those which originally 
PFIRRMANN indicated the occupation of the bearer of it. A liberal 

translation of it is "ferryman," and it is derived from 
the German word "Faehre." meaning ferry, and "Mann," meaning man. 
This family has lived at Woerth-on-the-Rhine for many generations, and 
probably the earlier members were ferrymen, or derived their income from 



728 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the water in some manner. The town of Woerth has about eighteen hun- 
dred inhabitants, and of these about twelve hundred bear the name of 
Pfirrmann. The family residence of this particular branch is still in ex- 
cellent condition, yet it has been in use for some generations. 

John Adam Pfirrmann was born in 1811, died in 1884 in the above 
mentioned house, and had the right to write his name as "Adam Pfirrmann, 
the Fifth," indicating that he was the fifth Adam in this family in direct 
descent who had married. His father was twice married and he was the 
only child of the second marriage. By the first marriage there was a daugh- 
ter, Martha, who married Matthias Doeminger, and died in her native land. 
John Adam Pfirrmann married Sybilla Karcher, born in Woerth in 1813, 

died there in 1887, a daughter of and (Wuest) Karcher, who had 

children: i. John, came to Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, learned the baker's 
trade, and then established himself in this line of business in Rochester, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 2. Frederick, is a farmer near Monaca, 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and has a saw mill on his farm which he oper- 
ates himself. 3. Sybilla, mentioned above. 4. and 5. Martin and Henry, 
living in Germany. 6. Elizabeth, married and came to Pittsburgh, where 
she died while still young. Mr. Pfirrmann had received an excellent educa- 
tion, and was accounted a good mathematician. He was the owner of a 
small farm, but spent the greater part of his time in general contract work, 
a good portion of this consisting of highway and dam construction. He 
amassed what was a considerable fortune for that time. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pfirrmann had children: i. Magdalene, married Henry Wolfe, now de- 
ceased, and is living in an old Bavarian town. 2. Sybilla, married Fred- 
erick Pfirrmann, and lives in her native town. 3. William, who also lives 
there, was for many years section boss on the railroad, and is now pensioned 
by this company. 4. Catherine, married Adam Voelker, a veteran of the 
Franco-Prussian war, has a government position, and lives in Germany. 
5. Caroline, married August Wuest, and died in Bavaria at the age of thirty 
years. 6. Franz Joseph, born in February, 1855, served eleven years in the 
German army, and is now a member of the government police force. 
7. Jacob, of further mention. Five children died in infancy. 

Jacob Pfirrmann, son of John Adam and Sybilla (Karcher) Pfirrmann, 
was born in Woerth-on-the-Rhine, in the southern part of Bavaria, Ger- 
many, December 26, 1857, in the same house in which his direct paternal 
ancestors had been born for some generations. He attended the public 
schools from the age of six to that of thirteen years, and then was an active 
assistant to his father on the farm and in the contract work. In 1881 he 
emigrated to the United States, going directly to Rochester, Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania, where he had cousins by the name of Karcher. He worked 
two weeks in a glass factory there, then, January 3, 1882, went to Home- 
stead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he entered the employ of 
William Glinsing, a butcher, for whom he worked six months. Two years 
were then spent in the employ of a butcher by the name of Espy, and in the 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 729 

summer of 1884 he went to Hamilton county, Ohio, and worked in a butcher 
shop there until 1887. Returning to Homestead, he opened a butcher shop 
for himself, April i, 1888, conducting his business on Eighth avenue for a 
period of eight years, after which he bought a store at the corner of Fifth 
avenue and McClure street, opening this April i, 1896, to which he still 
gives his personal attention. He has been very successful in the conduct 
of his business, and is the owner of a considerable amount of real estate. 
In national political affairs he gives his support to the Republican party, 
but in local matters he casts his vote independently without regard to 
party ties. He was brought up in the Lutheran faith, but has never been 
a member of any church since living in the United States. 

Mr. Pfirrmann married, September 23, 1890, Elizabeth, born in Fred- 
erick City, Maryland, a daughter of George and Charlotte S. (Meeks) 
Roelke, the last mentioned of whom died when her child was three years of 
age; Mr. Roelke was born in Pennsylvania, of German parentage, and was 
a weaver by trade. Mr. and Mrs. Pfirrmann have had children: Mary 
Elizabeth; Charlotte S., who is a student at the high school. While Mr. 
Pfirrmann had but limited opportunities for acquiring an extensive educa- 
tion in his youth, he has amply made up for this lack by well chosen read- 
ing and study in later years, and is a deep thinker and a public-spirited man. 



Himself of Irish birth, Arthur McConville is the repre- 
McCONVILLE sentative in the United States of an old Irish family, 

this record concerning itself with three generations 
thereof, all of lifelong Irish residence with the exception of the last. The 
family faith has ever been the Roman Catholic, that the church to which 
Michael, grandfather of Arthur McConville, belonged. He was a con- 
tractor by occupation, road-building the branch of his business in which he 
specialized, and he was also the owner of a small and fertile farm. He 
died when eighty-two years of age, his wife dying when she had attained 
about that age. Michael IMcConville married INIargaret Kimmel, and had 
children: i. John, a farmer. 2. Edward, of w^hom further. 3. Rose, mar- 
ried John Kinney. 4. Arthur, a baker. 5. Sarah, married James Doyle. 
6. Michael, a shoemaker. 7. Owen, a farmer. 8. Margaret, died unmar- 
ried. 9. Cecile, married a Mr. O'Hagan. The homes of the above children 
were in county Down, Ireland, where they passed their lives. 

(II) Edward McConville, son of Michael and Margaret (Kimmel) 
McConville, was born in Rathfryland, county Down, Ireland, in 1822, died 
in 1894. He owned a small tract of land, and on it raised stock, also con- 
ducting general farming operations, passing his entire life in the vicinity 
of the place of his birth. He and his family were adherents to the Roman 
Catholic faith. He married Fannie Ruddy, born in county Down, Ireland, 
in 1820, died in 1899, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (McConville) 
Ruddy, her father a native of county Louth, Ireland, her mother of county 
Down. Thomas Ruddy moved to county Down in young manhood, there 



730 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

becoming the owner of land, and there living until his death. Thomas and 
Margaret (McConville) Ruddy were the parents of three daughters: Fannie, 
of previous mention, married Edward McConville ; Nancy ; Mary, married 
Anthony McConville, and lived in county Down, Ireland. Children of 
Edward and Fannie (Ruddy) McConville: i. Margaret, married Daniel 
McClury, a farmer, and lives at Bell Brick, county Down, Ireland. 2. 
Thomas, lives on the homestead in county Down, Ireland. 3. Michael, 
D.D., died in 1913, a priest of the Roman Catholic church, head of a parish 
in county Dow^n, Ireland. 4. Everett, deceased ; went westward to Cali- 
fornia at the time of the gold discoveries. 5. Arthur, of whom further. 
6. Patrick, a priest of the Roman Catholic church, stationed in county Down, 
Ireland. 7. Mary Ann, married Arthur Tramer, a farmer of county Down, 
Ireland. 

(Ill) Arthur McConville, son of Edward and Fannie (Ruddy) Mc- 
Conville, was born at Rathfryland, county Down, Ireland, November 15, 
1852, and was reared on his father's farm in that locality, attending the 
national schools until he was fifteen years of age. He then devoted his 
time to assisting his father on the home farm, and was married, in 1885, 
he and his wife emigrating to the United States. Braddock, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, was the place in which they first settled, and here 
Mr. McConville obtained employment in the steel mills, soon afterward lo- 
cating in Homestead, Pennsylvania, v^'here he long lived. Here he entered 
the service of the Carnegie Steel Company, being placed in the converting 
department. For more than twenty years he remained in this place, his 
salary good, and during this time invested largely of his savings in local 
real estate. Holding title to several desirable lots he erected thereon modern 
and attractive houses, and also directed the construction of a large apartment 
house. In 191 1 he built the McConville Flats at No. 520 Ninth avenue, Mun- 
hall, and there resides at the present time. The care of his various interests 
occupies the greater part of his time, their administration his only activity. 
The prosperity that is Mr. McConville's is an illustration of the rewards of 
industry and thrift, for the success that has come to him has been the result 
of earnest, unremitting application to duty, and constant saving and at times 
self-denial. Such a course is by no means an easy one, but the prize that is 
Mr. McConville's makes it assuredly worth while. He is a member of the 
Catholic Mutual Beneficial Association, politically a Democrat, and with 
his family holds membership in the Roman Catholic Church. 

Mr. McConville married, November 20, 1885, Mary McAnally, born in 
county Armagh, Ireland, daughter of Owen and Anna McAnally, both of 
her parents lifelong residents of Ireland, both deceased. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. McConville : i. John, a civil engineer, lives at home. 2. Mary, lives 
at home. 3. Arthur, attending school. 4. Francis, a student. 5. Patrick, a 
student. 




^ 



(f^^an^c/y<. 




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 7;5i 

The name of Baldrige is one well known in Jrelaiifl for 
BALDRIGE many generations, and since various members of the fam- 
ily have been in the United States they have always dis- 
charged the duties of good citizens. Four brothers by this name emigrated 
from the north of Ireland, and for a time lived in the eastern part of Penn- 
sylvania. They were: John, Joseph, William and Samuel. Of these, John 
Baldrige became the owner of a large farm in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, a distillery and a flour mill, all located about two miles from 
Latrobe. Joseph will be referred to hereinafter; William also settled on 
a large farm in Westmoreland county, and became prosperous ; Samuel re- 
mained in Eastern Pennsylvania, but also became well-to-do. They made 
their way to the western part of the state in Conestoga wagons, all had ad- 
joining farms, and married three sisters. 

(I) Joseph Baldrige, mentioned above, was born in Ireland, and died in 
Pennsylvania in 1867, at the age of sixty-seven years. In addition to clear- 
ing and cultivating the large farm which he had taken up in Westmoreland 
county, in the earlier days he was engaged in hauling goods on the National 
Pike between Philadelphia and Baltimore and Pittsburgh. He and his 
brothers were ardent Presbyterians and worked actively in building up that 
denomination in their day. He married (first) Elizabeth Nichols, born in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was killed at the age of thirty-six 
years by a fall downstairs. Mr. Baldrige married (second) Kate Johnson, 
who survived him. Children: i. William, deceased; lived on the home- 
stead. 2. Robert, deceased; was a dry goods merchant; married Kate 
Birchfield, and died one year later. 3. John, of further mention. 4. Jennie, 
married James Mitchell, a farmer of Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 5. David, 
a railroad employee, who was the only child by the second marriage. 

(II) John Baldrige, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Nichols) Baldrige, 
was born two miles from Latrobe, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
December 26, 1832, died May 29, 1909. His early years were spent on the 
homestead farm, and he attended the public schools in the vicinity of his 
home. He became an expert penman, and at the age of twenty-one years 
went to Latrobe and there learned telegraphy. For some years he was sta- 
tion agent at Brinton, Pennsylvania, for the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany and for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. He was then located 
in the general superintendent's office at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, for 
some months, having charge of the opening of all stations on the Phila- 
delphia & Erie Railroad as it was being constructed. A short time was then 
spent in the position of conductor, and in 1866 he located at Braddock, 
Pennsylvania, becoming a silent partner in the firm of Corey, Lloyd & 
Black Company, coal operators. Mr. Baldrige was superintendent of the 
works of this company fifteen years, his office being at Braddock, and he then 
purchased. the real estate belonging to the company, and engaged in the real 
estate business, with which he was identified until his death. In 1867 he 
built the beautiful house which is still occupied by his widow. This is a fine 



732 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

residence constructed of gray brick, and is located on the bluff on the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad at Braddock. Mr. Baldrige was a man of strictest in- 
tegrity and an unusually high sense of honor in all his dealings, whether in 
private or business life. He was an active worker in the interests of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Braddock, of which he was the founder, and 
an elder all his life. He it was who collected the money necessary to erect 
this church edifice, and it was owing to his strenuous efforts that the work 
was pushed to completion. He was an exceptionally fine business man, and 
in all his business plans he had the hearty co-operation and assistance of his 
devoted wife. Mrs. Baldrige is now seventy-four years of age, but appears 
to be about sixty. She is a fine business woman, and was thoroughly in 
the confidence of her late husband in all his business plans, and practically 
took charge of all prior to his death. Since that time she has been managing 
the real estate business alone. She has a winter home in Florida, and pre- 
fers to live there the greater part of the year. 

Mr. Baldrige married, April i, 1862, Lida Corey, born at Port Perry, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1840. They have had chil- 
dren: I. Mary Josephine, married Richard Smythe, a steel worker, of 
Braddock; no children. 2. Laura, now deceased; married Dr. Charles Clif- 
ford, of Braddock, and left children : John and Ruth. 3. John Edgar, died 
at the age of nine years. 4. Anna May, married Clifton K. Harrison, a 
wholesale proprietary medicine dealer in East Liberty, Pennsylvania; they 
have children : Lida Corey, born May 27, 1905 ; Anna Frances, born Sep- 
tember 7, 1907; Clifton K. Jr., born May 20, 1909; Mary Josephine, born 
November 6, 1912. 5. Helen C, married Henry T. Wynn, a merchant, 
brick manufacturer and dealer in builders' supplies in Trafford, Pennsyl- 
vania; has one child, John B., born October 17, 1912. 6. Margaret Jane, 
married Edward McCrady, of McCrady Bros. Company, dealers in builders' 
supplies, of Edgewood, Pennsylvania ; children : Edward, John B., Eliza- 
beth F., Rebecca. 7. Carl C, an attorney of Wilkinsburg, with offices in 
Pittsburgh; married Lucy Wright, of Wilkinsburg, and has children: Carl 
C. Jr., deceased ; Robert W. ; Lida C. and John Ray. 8. Clarence Ray, of 
whom further. 

(HI) Clarence Ray Baldrige, son of John and Lida (Corey) Baldrige, 
was born in Braddock, Allegheny county. Pennsylvania, October 6, 1882. He 
was educated in his native town, and since reaching man's estate has had 
a prosperous business career. He was engaged in the real estate and in- 
surance business about ten years, then organized the Baldrige Motor Com- 
pany, of which he is the sole proprietor, and is conducting this most suc- 
cessfully. His home is situated in North Braddock, which district he has 
served as a councilman. His religious affiliation is with the First Presby- 
terian Church, and he is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and the 
Knights of Malta. Mr. Baldrige married, June 28, 1905, Elizabeth Mills, 
and they have children : John. Clarence Ray Jr., William M. 




c^^-a C /^^l^\ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA -jt.t, 

From the grand duchy of Baden, Germany, in the angle 
BROOKER formed by the Ivhinc on turning northward at Basel, the 
seat of Heidelberg, the oldest university in the German 
Empire, came Ignatius Brooker, about 1835. He settled in Pittsburgh, later 
in Franklin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was the father 
of Joseph Brooker, now deceased, but for many years one of the progress- 
ive and prominent citizens of Pine township, a man of great public spirit 
and high principle. 

Ignatius Brooker lived in Pittsburgh until 1845, then moved to Frank- 
lin township, where he bought a farm in 1850. In 1867, he located in Wex- 
ford, where he purchased the Shafer tract of land. In a few years he re- 
tired leaving his business interests in the hands of his sons. He married 
Mary Snyder, born in Holland, in February, 1814. Children: Joseph, of 
further mention ; Mary, Louisa, Catherine, Henry, and two who died in 
infancy. Ignatius Brooker and his wife were members of the Roman Cath- 
olic Church. He died August 28, 1884, she died March 17, 1897. 

Joseph Brooker, eldest son of Ignatius and Mary ( Snyder j Brooker, 
was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Squirrel Hill), February 14, 1837, 
died at Wexford, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 31, 19 12. He 
was educated in Pittsburgh public schools, and from youth was his father's 
trusted assistant on the farm and in business, after the removal from 
Franklin township to Wexford, he conducted a store in Wexford and owned 
the hotel which he conducted for several years, then rented it for three years, 
finally selling the property and locating on his farm of one hundred and 
eighty-six acres in Pine township. Later he added fifty acres to that farm 
and conducted a very successful business until his death. He was a public- 
spirited man and did a great deal for the town of Wexford and for Pine 
township. He was especially active in securing a right of way to bring a 
railroad to the township and in many ways manifested deep interest in the 
welfare of his community. He was a member of the Roman Catholic 
Church, and in politics a Democrat. 

Mr. Brooker married, August 18, 1869, Elizabeth Beaser, born August 
18, 1848, daughter of Christopher and Elizabeth (Walter) Beaser. She sur- 
vives her husband and with her children resides in Wexford. Children : 
I. Elizabeth. 2. Henry I., married Ottilia Duwell, and resides in Wexford; 
children : Dorothy and Henry I. Jr. 3. William R., married Rosina M. 
Young; children, William J., deceased; Mary R.. Mark C, Helen K.. Martha 
E. S. 4. Matilda, died in infancy. 5. Emma M. 6. Stella ]\I. 7. Alphonso 
A., married Eliabeth Altmyer : children. Mary Margaret and Joseph Arthur. 
8. Joseph F. 9. Sarah. 10. Hilda. 



Both of these families were introduced into 
' VIEHMIER-FLACCUS Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, by German 

progenitors, the former by Henry \'iehmier, 
the latter by William Flaccus. respectively, husband and father of Mrs. Caro- 
line (Flaccus) Viehmier. of McCandless township. Pennsylvania. 



734 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Henry Viehmier was born in Germany, December 28, 1845, died in 
Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1913. His boy- 
hood was spent in Germany, where he obtained a public school education. 
At the age of fourteen years he came to the United States, settling in Pitts- 
burgh and there learned the trade of machinist. He worked at his trade in 
Pittsburgh until 1873, then located on a farm of sixty acres in McCandless 
township, on which he resided until 1878, then moved to Pittsburgh East 
End, where he again worked at his trade for three years. He was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics a Republican. 

Mr. Viehmier married, July 3, 1872, Caroline Flaccus, born in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1844, daughter of William and Catherine 
(Rudolph) Flaccus. William Flaccus came to the United States from 
Germany (Prussia) at the age of nineteen years, settled in Pittsburgh, 
where he became a well known manufacturer of glue. He continued in 
business in Pittsburgh several years, then moved to Lawrenceville, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he operated a glue factory and a tannery. After operating the 
tannery ten years, it was destroyed by fire, and with his son, William 
Flaccus, he purchased a tannery in Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side) 
and established in business there as the William Flaccus & Son Leather 
Company, and after his death the son changed the name to the Flaccus 
Oak Leather Company, by which it is still known and operated by the sons of 
William Flaccus, son of William Flaccus (i). This business is still con- 
tinued under that name on River avenue of the same city. He married 
Catherine Rudolph and had issue: i. William, deceased. 2. Caroline, now 
the widow of Henry Viehmier. 3. George, a resident of Pittsburgh East 
End. 4. Catherine Anna, deceased. 5. Charles Louis. 6. Edward Henry, 
deceased. 7. Mary, died aged eleven years. 8. Emma Catherine, deceased. 
Children of Henry and Caroline (Flaccus) Viehmier: i. Emily Catherine, 
born August 11, 1873; married Aaron Fell, and has a daughter, Caroline 
Flaccus, born April 16, 1907. 2. William Flaccus, born April 8, 1875; mar- 
ried Anna J. Giffen, of West Virginia. 3. Henry Edward, born March 12, 
1877, died aged nine years. 4. Cornelia Bertha, born January 5, 1879, 
died aged eight years. 5. Elizabeth Anna, born August 10, 1881, died aged 
five years. 6. Howard R., born October 28, 1883, died aged three years. 
Mrs. Caroline (Flaccus) Viehmier survives her husband, residing on the 
farm she brought her husband, inherited from her father, also owning the 
old Flaccus homestead in Lawrenceville, where her youth was passed. She 
is a member of Highland Presbyterian Church of Perrysville, and a lady 
highly esteemed by all who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. 



From Alsace, Germany, now again swept by hostile armies, 
SCHMITT came Jacob Schmitt, a German lad barely sixteen years of 

age. He made his way to Troy Hill, near Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, where for two years he worked on a farm owned by Judge 
Lowery. He was possessed of some means and after leaving Troy Hill, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 735 

went to Shaler township, Allegheny county, and there purchased a small farm 
of fifty-three acres. As he prospcrerl he bought more land, adding twelve 
acres to the original fifty-three and two small pieces at Bowerton and Mill- 
vale. He began first running a small dairy of two cows, which he increased 
until finally his herd numbered thirty. The products of his dairy he delivered 
by wagon in Allegheny City at retail, but after the erection of the new 
market in Allegheny City he leased stand No. 8i, and there until his death 
disposed of all his farm and dairy products. The same stand is now oper- 
ated by his son, David. Jacob Schmitt was a leading member of the Ger- 
man Lutheran Church, president of the church council, member of the town- 
ship school board and a man highly respected everywhere. 

He married Barbara Shafer, born in Germany. Chilrlren : i. Bar- 
bara, deceased; married David Shafer; and lived in Robinson township. 
2. Henry, married Margaret Sauter ; lived in Millvale, Pennsylvania. 3. 
David, a farmer of Shaler township; married Catherine Whissert. 4. 
Charles, married Mary Sauter. 5. Lena, married Jacob Sauter. 6. Louisa, 
married Adam Sauter. 7. Jacob, of further mention. 8. Theodore. 9. 
Matilda, deceased; married John Bauerlein. 10. George Benjamin, mar- 
ried Rebecca Ren fort. Three other children died young. 

Jacob (2) Schmitt, seventh child of Jacob (i) and Barbara (Shafer) 
Schmitt, was born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
February 25, 1855. He was educated in the township public schools, and 
remained at home, his father's assistant, until arriving at man's estate. He 
then worked for himself elsewhere for a few years, but in 1877 he returned 
to the farm and has there resided continuously, engaged in farming and 
market gardening. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. He is highly respected in his community, his upright 
character and genial manner winning him many friends. Mr. Schmitt mar- 
ried Martha J., daughter of David Thompson, of Shaler township. Chil- 
dren: I. Barbara E., married John Seitz. 2. Jacob G., married Gertrude 
Blackburn. 3. Martha M., married Frederick Grail. 4. William D.. mar- 
ried Emma Walters. 5. John, residing with his parents. 6. Hannah, mar- 
ried Charles Lang. 7. Jessie, married Allen Schmitt. 8. Charles. 9. 
Carrie. 10. Rebecca. The latter three reside at home. 



"Mt. Airy Farm," now the home of Mrs. Mary E. 
THOMPSON (Hatch) Thompson, has been for many years in the 
Thompson name, having been first settled on by James 
Thompson, shortly after the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Thompson came to 
the farm a bride in 1870, and since August 3, 1903. has there resided, the • 
widow of James Thompson, grandson of James Thompson, the original 
owner. James Thompson married Isabella Galbraith and had issue : John, 
Hugh, James, W'illiam, Robert, of further mention, Andrew, David, Betsy, 
Mary, Isabella. Margaret J. 

(II) Robert Thompson, son of James and Isabella (Galbraith) Thomp- 
son, was one of the prosperous, well-known and highly respected farmers 



736 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He married Cath- 
erine, daughter of James and Catherine (Shaffer) Stewart. Issue: Mary 
J.; James, of further mention,; Alfred M. ; Milton, died in the Union army; 
Adeline V. 

(Ill) James (2) Thompson, son of Robert and Catherine (Stewart) 
Thompson, was born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
July I, 1838, died there August 3, 1903. He attended Locust Grove pub- 
lic school, and remained at the home farm until of legal age. He then went 
to the Pennsylvania oil fields and for one year worked at the oil wells on 
the Tarr farm in V^enango county. He then returned to the home farm, 
which was ever afterward his home. He erected the present farm house 
and barns in 1873 and 1880 and left the farm in a highly improved condi- 
tion. He was a trustee of the Presbyterian Church for many years, and 
in political faith was a Democrat. His character was above reproach and 
in his home life he was a devoted husband and father. 

Mr. Thompson married, November 24, 1870, Mary Elizabeth Hatch, 
born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 24, 
1846, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Jane (McFerrin) Hatch, who had 
children: i. Mary E., widow of James Thompson. 2. John, died aged 
twenty-one years. 3. Sarah Jane, deceased ; married William Oakley ; 
children : Jessie and Jennie. 4. Joseph Blanchard, died aged fourteen years. 
5. Nancy Anna, married William Schar, of West View, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania; children: Mabel May, Sarah Esther, William H., Earl. Chil- 
dren of James and Mary E. (Hatch) Thompson: i. Charles Blanchard, 
born May 23, 1872, died February 15, 1873. 2. Flora Jane, born December 
7, 1874, died June i, 1881. 3. Laurence Siebold, born April 6, 1879, died 
June 5, 1881. 4. James Marshall, born May 23, 1882, now cultivating fifty 
acres of the home farm. 5. Elizabeth Stewart, born March 3, 1885 ; mar- 
ried, June 27, 1907, Leroy McElheny ; children : Mildred Lillian and Chester 
Addison. Mrs. Mary E. (Hatch) Thompson has continued her residence 
at the home farm since becoming a widow, her husband's relative, 
Charles Thompson, son of Alfred and Rebecca (Owens) Thompson, 
residing with her. 



George E. Holmes is a member of a Virginian family long 
HOLMES respected in that state, and prominent in the afifairs of the 

Methodist Episcopal Church in Virginia. His paternal grand- 
father was a well-known clergyman in the Methodist Episcopal Church, oc- 
cupying the pulpit of a church of that denomination. He passed his whole 
life in that state and finally died there. One of his children was Hamilton 
Holmes, the father of George E. Holmes. 

Hamilton Holmes was born in Virginia, and after completing the gen- 
eral portion of his education, he took a course to prepare him for the Metho- 
dist ministry, the lifelong calling of his father. This he completed suc- 
cessfully, and shortly afterwards entered the church. After a period he 
gave up the ministry, however, and betook himself to a commercial life. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 737 

engaging in the wholesale grocery business in Louisville, Kentucky, whither 
he had removed. In this enterprise he succeeded admirably, providing 
amply for his large family of fourteen children. Another enterprise in later 
life led him west to what was then the territory of Washington, where he 
eventually died. He was thrice married, fourteen children in all being born 
to him. His second wife was Katherine Nixon, a native of Tennessee, 
where she was born. While still very young, her parents had moved to 
Louisville, Kentucky, and it was in that city that she had met Hamilton 
Holmes. Of this union there were born four children, George E., two 
sisters, and another child who died in infancy. 

George E. Holmes, the eldest child of Hamilton and Katherine (Nixon) 
Holmes, was born March 10, 1857, at Jefifersonville, Indiana, during a tem- 
porary residence of his parents in that city. He was educated for a time 
in the public schools of his native town, but while still young he began the 
serious business of life by securing a position on a river ferry. He con- 
tinued in this service for a time and then, having gained the requisite ex- 
perience in river work, was enabled to find employment on a steamer plying 
between his native place and New Orleans. After the lapse of a consider- 
able time, Mr. Holmes gave up the river work entirely and entered the 
service of the Edward Ford Company, a concern in the plate glass business 
at Jefifersonville, Indiana. In this work he gave the greatest satisfaction, 
and when in 1881, the Ford family removed to Tarentum, Pennsylvania, 
and there re-established their glass business, Mr. Holmes accompanied them 
and continued in their employment. Here he continued for ten years longer, 
or until 1891, when as a result of industry and frugality, Mr. Holmes had 
laid aside enough money to enable him to engage in business for himself. 
In the year 1891, accordingly, he opened a pool room in Tarentum, and has 
since been engaged in a prosperous business there. He is also connected 
with the Keystone State Building and Loan Association, a very large and 
influential concern closely connected with the Bank of Pittsburgh, and for 
twenty-two years has been its local secretary at Tarentum. Mr. Holmes 
takes a very active part in the life of his community and is a prominent 
figure in-many circles. He is a member of the Improved Order of Hepta- 
sophs. 

Mr. Holmes married, March 28, 1882, Sarah Horn, a daughter of Wes- 
ley and Anna Horn, of Greensboro, Pennsylvania, where she was bom 
September, 1855. To Mr. and Mrs. Holmes has been born a daughter, 
Bessie, now Mrs. Burdette Harrison, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania. IMr. 
Harrison holds the responsible position of assistant superintendent of the 
Allegheny Glass Company. They are the parents of one child, a son. Harold 
H. Harrison. Mr. Holmes and the members of his family are all com- 
municants in the Methodist Episcopal Church. 



In Ireland, Kelly has for centuries been one of the most com- 

KELLY mon surnames, and in the Irish language is called Ceallach, 

signifying strife or war. A family of the name of Kelly has 



738 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

possessed a freehold in the Isle of Man from time immemorial. The Eng- 
lish Kellys furnished their share of early colonists in New England. The 
name is also frequently spelled Kelley, which was orginally Kelleigh, this 
can be traced in England to a period prior to the Norman conquest, and the 
bearers of it were undoubtedly descended from the ancient Britons. The 
principal manorial seat of the family in England has been for many cen- 
turies located in the small parish of Kelly, in Devonshire, but whether the 
community derived its name from the family, or vice-versa, cannot be de- 
termined. The family under discussion here came to the United States from 
Ireland. 

(I) Nicholas Kelly, who was born in county Louth, Ireland, spent his 
entire life there. He and his wife were Roman Catholics. 

(II) James Kelly, son of Nicholas Kelly, was born near Drogheda, 
county Louth, Ireland, in 1816, died in 1865. He lost a large fortune on 
the vessel owned by his brother-in-law, which went down in a storm on the 
Irish Sea, and he decided to emigrate to America with a view of more easily 
regaining a competence. His early years had been spent on the home farm, 
and after his marriage he had opened a provision store in the town of 
Drogheda. He emigrated to America in 1847, alone, going directly to New 
Orleans, Louisiana, and in 1848 came northward to Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he established a home for his family. His wife, with their 
son, Nicholas, came to the United States from Ireland in 1849, landing at 
Philadelphia, after seven weeks on the ocean in a sailing vessel, the "Isaac 
Newton." The trip to Pittsburgh was made by way of canal, and they ar- 
rived there. May 9, 1849. Two other children were sent for later. Mr. 
Kelly was a laborer, and lived on James street, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
where his death and that of his wife occurred. They were members of the 
Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Kelly married, in Ireland, Mary Gogan, born 
in county Louth in 1818, died in 1866, whose parents never left Ireland, but 
who had a paternal uncle, who came to America, and lived in Bridgeport, 
Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly had children: i. Annie, died in child- 
hood in Ireland. 2. Nicholas, of further mention. 3. Peter, born July 4, 
1844, served four years in the Union army during the Civil War. 4. Mary, 
born March 20, 1847, is a widow and living in Pittsburgh. 5. Margaret, born 
March 26, 1850; married Albert Alexander, now deceased; lives at North 
Side, Pittsburgh. 6. Katherine, born March 26, 1852, died young. 7. Anne, 
born January 22, 1855, died of typhoid fever at the age of twenty-five years. 

8. James, born April 6, 1857, was drowned in the Allegheny canal in 1863. 

9. Patrick, born October 2, 1859, died young. 10. Michael, born August 
3, 1863; is a watchman in the employ of the city of Pittsburgh, and lives at 
North Side. 

(Ill) Nicholas (2) Kelly, son of James and Mary (Gogan) Kelly, was 
born in county Louth, Ireland, March 5, 1842, and baptized in St. Patrick's 
Church in Drogheda, by Father Henratta. He was a pupil in the public 
schools of Allegheny until the age of eleven years, then found employment 
in the Eagle Cotton Works, where he remained until the age of fifteen 




^iyi€Ju3-u>uO 




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 739 

years. He was apprenticed to learn the molder's trade in the Marshall & 
McGeary Foundry. May 14, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, First Regi- 
ment West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, and fought in the battle of Philippi, 
West Virginia, the first battle after that at Fort Sumter. On March 6, 1865, 
he enlisted as second lieutenant in Company F, Eighty-seventh Regiment 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the battle of Petersburg, 
March 12, and also at Appomattox. His regiment was a part of the Sixth 
Army Corps, which was reviewed separately at the close of the war. He 
then resumed his work at the foundries as a molder, being employed at 
various places, and in 1886, in association with James Niel, opened a foundry 
on Smallman street, Pittsburgh, operating this under the name of James 
Niel & Company. Two years later Mr. Kelly purchased the building, Nos. 
1708-10 Wharton street. South Side, Pittsburgh, and started a foundry in- 
dependently, and has been successfully identified with this since that time. 
In 1892 he admitted his son, James G., to the firm, and the name became 
N. Kelly & Son. In 1895 he erected a fine brick house at No. 802 Browns- 
ville road, Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania, and still lives there. He is a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic Church, having been confirmed in this faith in his 
youfh by Bishop O'Connor. 

Mr. Kelly married, January 31, 1861, Flora Hanchey, born in Switzer- 
land in 1842, died January 28, 1912. She was a daughter of Jacob and 
Elizabeth Hanchey, both natives of Switzerland, who emigrated to the 
United States in 1845, and made their home in Pittsburgh. Mr. Hanchey 
was a school teacher in Switzerland, but worked in the lead works in this 
country, and died at the age of sixty-five years, while his wife lived to the 
advanced age of ninety-seven years, eight months. They were both members 
of the Lutheran Church. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly were the parents of children : 
I. Anna, died of scarlet fever at the age of eighteen months. 2. Anna, mar- 
ried Oliver McKelvey, now deceased; lives in Knoxville, Allegheny count}', 
Pennsylvania. 3. Irene, married Charles W. Miller, and lives in Duquesne 
Heights. 4. James G., born October 13, 1868; is the manager of his father's 
foundry; married Stella Wier, and has five children. 5. Elizabeth, born 
January 28, 1871, unmarried. 6. Emma, born January 28, 1873; married 
James Hector; lives in Duquesne Heights. 



The first of his line to come to the United States, all of the 
REUTZEL past history of the family of which Conrad Reutzel is a 

member is relative to its German home. Conrad Reutzel 
is a grandson of Christian Reutzel, a farmer of Germany, who there passed 
his entire life. Christian Reutzel married and reared a family. 

(II) Conrad Reutzel, son of Christian Reutzel, was born in Hesse- 
Darmstadt, Germany, and there died. Like his father, he was a farmer, 
and also a pump maker, following these callings until his death. He married 
Mary Nauman, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, and had children: Henry, 
Catherine, Anna, Mary, Elizabeth, residents of Germany ; Conrad, of whom 
further. 



740 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

(III) Conrad (2) Reutzel, son of Conrad (i) and Mary (Nauman) 
Reutzel, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, October 30, 1868. His 
father's death occurred when he was but a child, his mother dying when 
he was thirteen years of age, and two years later, in 1883, Conrad Reutzel 
emigrated to the United States. His name, however, was never removed 
from the military register, and upon his non-appearance for military service 
when he had arrived at suitable age, his share of his father's estate was con- 
fiscated by the German government. He later entered claim for this sum, 
and was legally upheld, but after deducting the expense he had borne in 
securing this favorable judgment he gained but the small sum of sixty- 
eight dollars. Arriving in Baltimore, Maryland, the port made by the trans- 
atlantic steamer on which he had engaged passage, Conrad Reutzel pro- 
ceeded directly to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he was employed by an 
uncle conducting gardening operations at Troy Hill. He had obtained good 
school training in the land of his birth, attending school for but three months 
in this country, and when sixteen years of age entered the horseshoe de- 
partment of the Shellenberger Mill, passing twenty years in this service. 
On January i, 1900, Mr. Reutzel moved to his present home in Shaler 
township, a farm of sixteen acres, all kept in a high state of cultivation, 
irrigation being employed in eight acres thereof. Mr. Reutzel has installed 
his own irrigation system, his source of supply being a nearby creek, from 
which, with a seventeen horse-power engine, he pumps water into a supply 
tank with a capacity of four thousand barrels, thence to a smaller tank, 
holding five hundred barrels, on the hilltop, from which elevation it re- 
ceives its pressure. Mr. Reutzel has also an independent water system for 
his house, a spring on the premises offering the best and purest of water, 
which is pumped to a one-hundred-and-twenty barrel supply tank in the 
upper part of the house. Vegetables and fruits are the products of his land, 
his thorough knowledge and skillful care enabling him to profit largely from 
his operations. Mr. Reutzel is a modern agriculturist in every sense of the 
word, and utilizes the discoveries of his own experiments and of agricul- 
tural scientists to enable him to derive the greatest productive force from 
his soil without at the same time destroying its fertility. He is possessed of 
considerable mechanical skill, and in 191 1 perfected an appliance for use 
on corn, pea and bean planters to regulate the depth of planting, an inven- 
tion which greatly increases the efficacy of those devices. Mr. Reutzel en- 
gages in the manufacture of this appliance during the winter months, when 
not busily occupied on his land, and places it on the market through the 
agency of J. W. Scott. He is a member of the Masonic Order, and is one 
of the commissioners of Shaler township. His church is St. Luke's Lu- 
theran. Mr. Reutzel is one of the prosperous citizens of the township, a 
leader in all movements of public interest, and holds the confidence of his 
neighbors. Intelligent application and tireless industry show their results in 
his finely kept farm, while his irreproachable reputation among his fellows is 
the fruit of honor, integrity and right living. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 741 

Mr. Reutzcl married, in 1893, Elizabeth Reatz, born in Allegheny City 
(Pittsburgh North Side), Pennsylvania. They are the parents of: Walter 
Frederick and Harold Conrad. 



This old and reputable German family was planted in 
WATENPOOL Western Pennsylvania by Jacob (2) Watenpool, who 
came at the age of twenty-three years, settling in Pitts- 
burgh. His father, Jacob (ij Watenpool, spent a few of his later years in 
Pennsylvania, visiting his children, but lived nearly his entire life in his 
native land. Jacob Watenpool had issue: Elizabeth, Catherine, Jacob (2), 
Theodore, Anna. 

(H) Jacob (2) Watenpool was born in Germany in 1829, and was there 
educated in the public schools. In 1852 he came to the United States, set- 
tling in Pittsburgh, where he worked four years in the rolling mills. He 
then moved to a farm in Allegheny county, where he resided until his death 
in 1907, at the age of seventy-eight years. He married Lena Snyder and 
had issue: i. Jacob (3), of further mention. 2. Andrew, married Theresa 
McCurry, and lives in Franklin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
3. Peter, married Amelia Gehague, and lives in Franklin township. 4. 
Mary, married Patrick Young. 5. Louis, married Anna Warner. 6. Cath- 
erine, married Andrew Edrews. 7. Lydia, unmarried. 8. Rosa, married 
Henry Whitmer. Jacob Watenpool and his family were members of the 
Roman Catholic Church. 

(HI) Jacob (3) Watenpool, son of Jacob (2) and Lena (Synder) 
Watenpool, was born on Pittsburgh South Side in 1854. He attended public 
schools, and in early manhood learned the trade of carpenter and for several 
years was both farmer and carpenter. Later he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and twenty-seven acres in Franklin township, upon which he now 
resides, a general farmer and gardener. He is a member of the Roman 
Catholic Church, and in politics is independent in his action. Mr. Waten- 
pool married Mary, daughter of John Altmire. Children: William, Ida, 
married George Garger, Harry, Arthur, Edward. 



Andrew Skiles, a Scotchman, came to Pennsylvania at an 
SKILLS early day, settling in the eastern part of the state, where he 

became a farmer and famous local hunter. He married and 
had children : William, Thomas, Isaac, Rebecca, James, of further mention, 
and John. From these sprang the Skiles family of Western Pennsylvania, 
among them Henry Skiles, of Bellevue, Allegheny county, a representative 
of the third generation in the United States. 

(II) James Skiles, son of Andrew Skiles, was born in Eastern Penn- 
sylvania, in the year 1790, died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He 
attended the subscription school, and worked on the home farm until about 
twenty years of age, then came to Western Pennsylvania, settling in Ohio 
township, Allegheny county. He obtained title to land in the township, 
which he cleared and on which he erected a house. During the second war 



74^ WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

with Great Britain, he enhsted, but before reaching the field of action with 
his company the war ended and they returned to their homes. He resumed 
farming and was so engaged until his deatli. He married Catherine, daugh- 
ter of John Andrew Emerick. She died in June, 1862. Children: i. 
Andrew, married Hannah Rosensteel. 2. Mary, married Henry Young. 
3. Adam, died in infancy. 4. Margaret, married Samuel Neely. 5. John, mar- 
ried Fanny Brown. 6. Sarah, married William Neely. 7. Hannah, married 
Andrew McCawley. 8. Jane, married Philip Creese. 9. William, married 
Susanna Smith. 10. Rebecca, married Alexander Little. 11. James, married 
Esther Boli. 12. Samuel, twin of James, married Mary Newell. 13. Henry, 
of further mention. ' The family were Presbyterians. 

(HI) Henry Skiles, son of James and Catherine (Emerick) Skiles, 
was born in Ohio township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 
1834. He was educated in public schools, and in early life worked on the 
home farm. Later he learned the trade of carpenter, an occupation he fol- 
lowed for several years. He then began farming in Franklin township, then 
spent a year in farming in Beaver county. While in Beaver county, in 1862, 
he enlisted in Company L, Fourteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
later was transferred to Company E, of the same regiment, served thirty- 
five months and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. He saw 
hard service with the Fourteenth Regiment, fought with General Sheridan 
up and down the Shenandoah Valley and shared the often hard fortunes 
of his regiment on many battle fields, but came through all without bodily 
injury. After the war he worked at his trade for two years, then began 
farming. In 1884 he purchased his present farm in Franklin township and 
cultivated its fertile acres, until his retirement, in favor of his son, William 
J. Skiles, who now operates the farm. Lie is a member of Franklin Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, is a Republican in politics, and for nine years served 
his township as school director. Although verging on the eightieth year of 
an active useful life, Mr. Skiles is still hearty and well-preserved, is in- 
terested in current affairs and is thoroughly informed on all public questions. 

Mr. Skiles married, in 1854, Kate E., daughter of Peter and Eliza 
(Wiggins) Boli, and has children: i. William J., born May 2, i860, now 
cultivating the home farm, unmarried. 2. Minnie, born February 14, 1862; 
married William George, and resides with her father. 3. Guy M., born 
September 2, 1867; married Margaret Ludwig, and resides in Sewickley, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Martha E., born December 12, 1869; married Harry L. 
Watson, and resides in Perrysville, Pennsylvania; children, Nellie, Minnie, 
Elsie. 5. Henry Price, born March 28, 1874, married Lottie Rusz, and 
resides in East Liberty, Pennsylvania ; children, Dorothy, Helen, Minnie. 



When Thomas Keown, a native of Ireland, came to the 

KEOWN United States from the land of his birth he was a youth of 

nineteen years, having been educated in Ireland. He was a 

son of William Keown, who with his wife passed his entire life in Ireland. 

(II) Thomas Keown, son of William Keown, settled soon after his 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 743 

arrival in the United States on a farm in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
that is now the site of the tovi^n of Keown. He bought one hundred acres 
of land, the purchase price four dollars per acre, and there built a log house, 
afterward rci)lacing it with one of brick, which is standing to the present time. 
A great part of this tract he cleared, conducting general farming operations 
in connection with his work at his trade, brick molding, and prospered in 
his dual business. The bricks of which his second house was made he manu- 
factured. His church was the Protestant Episcopal, and in public serv- 
ice he filled the ofifices of school director and township supervisor. He 
was a public-spirited, dutiful citizen, living a life of usefulness and activity, 
passed in peace and enjoyable communion with his fellows. He married 
Anna Pierce, a native of Pennsylvania, of German descent, her parents, 
Obidiah and Mary Pierce, natives of eastern Pennsylvania, who moved west- 
ward to McCandless township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where they 
died. Children of Thomas and Anna (Pierce) Keown: James, Mary Ann, 
Jane, John, of whom further, Nancy, Thomas, a soldier in the Union army 
during the war between the states, in the command of Colonel Clark, 
William. 

(HI) John Keown, son of Thomas and Anna (Pierce) Keown, was 
born at Keown, McCandless township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 
1839, the locality taking its name from the family founded in Pennsylvania 
by Thomas Keown. His early education was obtained in the public schools, 
and after he had reached an age at which his services were useful on the 
home farm, his opportunities for school attendance were limited to about 
three months a year. He became a farmer when a young man, and until 
he was forty-five years of age cultivated the home farm, then becoming 
keeper of the toll gate at Pine Creek and Wexford roads, a position he held 
for fourteen years. In 1892 he was appointed postmaster at the Keown 
post office, McCandless township, by President Cleveland, and held it for 
seventeen years, and then resigned. He is a member of the Lutheran 
Church. 

Mr. Keown married, in 1868, Margaret Ann Graley, born in Ireland, 
daughter of Robert and Jane (Hastings) Graley, her parents both natives 
of Ireland, where Robert Graley died, her mother marrying again, her sec- 
ond husband William Sharp. Her second marriage occurred after her 
emigration to the United States with her two children, her mother, and 
brothers. Jane Hastings was a daughter of David and Jane Hastings, her 
father dying in Ireland, her mother in the United States, and she was three 
weeks on the sea en route to this country, settling immediately in Allegheny 
City (Pittsburgh North Side). Children of John and IMargaret Ann 
(Graley) Keown: i. Robert Graley, lives on the homestead in McCandless 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania; he has been justice of the peace 
for three terms. 2. Thomas Francis, lives at home, an employee of the 
Western Electric Company, his duties those of inspector. 3. Anna Elizabeth, 
deceased ; married Charles Schafer, and had children : Earl, Charles, Anna 
Margaret, the latter of whom lives with her grandparents. 4. John Davis, 



744 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

resides in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, employed by the Manufacturers' 
Light and Heat Company. 5. Harry Lynn, lives in Westview, Pennsylvania. 
6. Elva Jane, lives at home. 7. Margaret Edith, lives at home. 



Christian Shenot, a native of South Germany, emigrated to 
SHENOT America in 1855, and settled at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Later he removed to Franklin township, Allegheny county, 
and then to Marshall township, in the same county, where he became the 
owner of three hundred acres of land, a large part of which he cleared and 
cultivated. He gave his political support to the Democratic party, and was 
a member of the Catholic Church. His death occurred in 1874. Prior to 
coming to America, he married Mary Shafifer, and they had children : 
August N., of further mention ; Mary, Peter, Sophia, Mathias. 

(H) August N. Shenot, son of Christian and Mary (Shaffer) Shenot, 
was born in South Germany about 1850, died in 1889. He was a very young 
child when brought to this country by his parents, and received his education 
here in the public schools. He was a farmer all his life, active in the in- 
terests of the Democratic party, and a devout member of the Catholic 
Church. Mr. Shenot married Catherine, a daughter of Ignatius Brooker, 
who owned all the land on which Wexford is now located. Children : 
Charles P., of further mention ; William, living in Pittsburgh, married 
Josephine Carlisle; Matilda, unmarried, lives with her mother; Henry, in the 
dairy business in Pittsburgh, in association with his brother Charles P. ; 
Edward, living on the old homestead, married Elizabeth Rudolph. 

(Ill) Charles P. Shenot, son of August N. and Catherine (Brooker) 
Shenot, was born in Marshall township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
May 28, 1877. He acquired a sound practical education in the public 
schools of Wexford, Allegheny county, and made the best use of his op- 
portunities. He has always been actively identified with agricultural pur- 
suits, and is now engaged in farming, making a specialty of growing fruits 
and dairy farming. In both of these branches he has been very suc- 
cessful. His political afifiliation is with the Democratic party, in whose 
interests he has been an active worker, and he served for a time as town- 
ship inspector. His religious allegiance is with the Catholic Church, of 
which he is a devout member, and to which he gives generously of his 
means. Mr. Shenot married Elizabeth Schwindman, and they have had 
children : Earl, Loretta, Mary, Clara. 

(The Schwindman Line.) 

(I) Wendel Schwindman, a native of Germany, came to America in 
1841, and settled at Warrendale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Martha Brooker and had children : Philip, of further mention ; Eliza- 
beth, Mary, Margarethe. 

(II) Philip Schwindman, son of Wendel and IMartha (Brooker) 
Schwindman, was born in Baden, Germany, May 16, 1818. He was edu- 
cated in Germany, and after his arrival in this country attended night school 
for a time in order to acquire a mastery of the English language. His re- 




Cl/t6l{U^i.uv ^.^-^rn-i 



Z^-^L-t^t^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 745 

ligious connection was with tlie Catholic Church, and he was an active 
worker in the interests of the Democratic party, later serving as school 
director and as town supervisor. At the time of his death he was the owner 
of three hundred and fifty acres of land in Marshall township. He mar- 
ried Mary Ann Corn, and had children : Pauline, who died at the age of 
twenty-six years ; David, of further mention ; Elizabeth, deceased ; Lizzy, 
unmarried, lives in Pittsburgh ; Joseph, died in 1905. 

(Ill) David Schwindman, son of Philip and Mary Ann fCorn; 
Schwindman, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1S45. 
He was educated in the public schools in the vicinity of his home, and his 
youthful years were spent in the usual manner of a farmer's son. Later 
he became the owner of four hundred and fifty acres of land in Marshall 
and Pine townships, which he cultivates in an up-to-date and profitable 
manner. He is a Democrat, and has served as school director and tax 
collector of the township, and he is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. 
Schwindman married Matilda, a daughter of Henry Blum, of Pittsburgh, 
and they have had children : Henry, married Maggie Shenot, lives in Pine 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania ; Emma, married Albert Gogler, 
lives in Oakland, Pennsylvania ; Elizabeth, who married Mr. Shenot, as 
above stated ; Clara, married Leo Whelan, born in New Castle, Pennsylvania, 
now living in Marshall township, Allegheny county, and they have had chil- 
dren : Edward, Hilda, Charles, Mary. 



The Jordan family had its origin in France, where we find it 
JORDAN as Jourdain or Jourdaine, and from thence it came to Eng- 
I land and Germany, where the form of the name was slightly 

changed. The name was probably first adopted as a surname by some man 
who had been a crusader or pilgrim to Palestine, and looked upon the his- 
toric stream. A number of members of this family have come to America, 
one being known to have died in Pittsburgh during the cholera epidemic of 
1849 ; another went to Austria, where he died, and they are now scattered 
all through Germany and the United States. 

Sebastian Jordan, brother of the two mentioned above, was born in 
Baden, Germany, in 1822, died in Karlsruhe, May 7, 1872. He was a ma- 
chinist by trade, and later became an engine builder of note, following this 
occupation until his death, at which time he was a resident of Karlsruhe, 
Baden, Germany. He and his wife were devout Roman Catholics. He 
married Thekla Adams, born in Baden, October 4, 1826, died June 4, 1898. 
But little is known of her family except that she had six sisters, and one 
brother, Tobias Adams, who owned and operated several fiour mills in Ger- 
many. Mr. and Mrs. Jordan became the parents of one child. 

Rev. William L. J. Jordan, son of Sebastian and Thekla (Adams) 
Jordan, was born in the town of Karlsruhe, Baden. Germany. September 13, 
1864. and was about seven years of age when death robbed him of his father. 
The public scliools in the vicinity of his birthplace provided his elementary 
education, and he then prepared for the university at the Gymnasium, which 



746 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

about corresponds to the American high schools. From his earHest years 
he had shown great aptitude in his studies, and having matriculated at the 
Freiburg University, was graduated from this institution in 1887 with honor. 
In that year he came to the United States and took up his theological studies 
at St. Vincent's Abbey, Beatty, Pennsylvania, and was graduated in 1888. 
He was ordained a priest of the Roman Catholic Church, July 13, 1888, 
and his colleagues admit that he is one of the most learned men among 
them. In addition to his native tongue, German, he speaks about five other 
languages, and a number of dialects fluently, and has a superficial knowledge 
of several others. He is an expert in the study and translation of Hebrew, 
and has made an exhaustive study of the early Scriptures. His first charge 
was the church at Altoona, Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1892; 
he was then about one year at Rochester, Pennsylvania ; Wexford, Pennsyl- 
vania, until November, 1894, when he returned to Altoona, Pennsylvania, 
remaining there until 1897. In November of that year he was given charge 
of the church and parish of St. Francis, at Homestead, Pennsylvania, and 
is still the minister of that flock. St. Francis' Roman Catholic Church of 
Homestead was founded in 1890 by Rev. Father John B. Dufifner, then 
located at St. Peter's Church, on South Side, Pittsburgh. Father Norbert 
Bausch was in charge from 1892 until 1897, since which time the responsi- 
bilities of this parish have been borne by Rev. Jordan. He has the valuable 
gift of being able to arouse the interest of his parishioners and of keeping 
this interest alive. This is greatly due to the personal note in all he does 
for the people under his charge, and they feel that they have in him, not 
alone the priest who looks after their spiritual welfare, but the man, with 
the warm, human heart in his breast, who is ready to sympathize with them 
in all their little troubles, however insignificant they may appear to be. 
There are about seventy-five families in this parish, and Rev. Jordan has 
built a fine, new brick church and school, and has greatly improved matters 
in general. He has visited the land of his birth three times, in 1896, 1908, 
and in 191 3, each time bringing here, upon his return, new ideas for the 
comfort and benefit of his beloved parishioners. 



Numerous pioneers by the name of Clark and Clarke came to 
CLARK New England during the first years of its settlement, the name 

having been common in all parts of England for many cen- 
turies. The arms of tlie Sufl'olk branch of the family are: Argent, on a 
bend gules, between three roundels sable, as many swans in the field. Crest: 
Out of a tau cross or, three roses gules, leaves vert, between a pair of 
wings azure. Motto : Secretum mei gaudii in cruce. Owing to the fre- 
quent loss and total destruction of early Colonial records, due to Indian 
raids and other causes, it is not always possible to trace descent from early 
settlers with accuracy at this day. That the Clark family was numerously 
and honorably represented in the New England Colonies is a matter of 
historical record, and from that section they migrated to others, until they 
are now to be found in every state in the U^nion. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 747 

Charles Clark, whose parents lived and died in the state of Massachu- 
setts, was educated in the public schools of that state, and in early manhood 
came to Pennsylvania, where he settled at McKeesport, and there was su- 
perintendent of a department in an iron factory. He soon abandoned this, 
however, and engaged in business as a general merchant, continuing this 
for some years, then became a traveling salesman, an occupation with which 
he was identified until his death. He took an active part in the public affairs 
of his town in the interests of the Republican party, and served as a school 
director. He and his wife were members of the Baptist Church. 

Mr. Clark married, June 10, 1862, Mary Emeline Mouck, born in Find- 
lay ville, Washington county, Pennsylvania, April i, 1842, the Rev. M. Mc- 
Kinstry officiating at this ceremony. Her family line is subjoined. They 
had children: Nannie Viola, bom February 27, 1863, lives with her 
mother; Emma Lucretia, born September 4, 1864, married James Laubie, 
died in Pittsburgh; William Edward, born February 5, 1867, is a clerk and 
lives in Knoxville, Pittsburgh; George Mosely, born January 17, 1869, died 
in infancy; Gertrude, born January 22, 1871, married Frank Holmes, and 
lives in Crafton, Pennsylvania; Charles, born January 6, 1876, is purchas- 
ing agent for the Pittsburgh Forge and Iron Company, and resides with his 
mother; Louis Caster, born June 11, 1878, a salesman with the May Lum- 
ber Company, also resides with his mother; Ada Kathleen, born August 4, 
1881, resides with her mother; Merton Philips, born October 15, 1883, is a 
civil engineer, and superintendent of the Bessemer Coal and Coke Company. 

(The Philips Line.) 

(I) Joseph Philips married Mary . 

(II) Rev. David Philips, son of Joseph and Mary Philips, came from 
Wales to America prior to the Revolution, and took an active part in that 
conflict, having command as captain of a company of militia. He married 
Mary Thomas and had thirteen children, all now deceased. 

(III) Josiah Philips, son of Rev. David and Mary (Thomas) Philips, 
was an extensive land owner in Washington county, Pennsylvania, where 
he was a farmer. He married (first) Sarah Bell, and had children: David, 
Mary, John, Joseph, Robert, Lizzie, Isaac, Sarah, Nancy, of further men- 
tion ; Josiah. He married (second) Mrs. Blackmore and had children: 

Margaret, Richard, William, James. 

(IV) Nancy Philips, daughter of Josiah and Sarah (Bell) Philips, 
was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, where she grew to maturity, 
and married William Mouck, a son of John Mouck, an old resident of 
Washington county. Mr. and Mrs. Mouck removed to IMcKeesport. Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in cabinet making and 
as a funeral director. In his later years he retired from business occupa- 
•tion, and died at the advanced age of ninety-eight years in Washington 
county, and is buried at McKeesport. Both were members of the Baptist 
Church. They had children : Josiah, a lieutenant in the L'nion army, was 
killed by a sharpshooter at the battle of Gettysburg; Edward, deceased; 



748 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Mary Emeline, of further mention; Sarah Belle, married James Miller; 
William, a farmer in West Chester, Pennsylvania ; Lorena, married Edwin 
Miller, and died leaving two children ; Anna Adelaide, died in early youth ; 
Elizabeth Ellen, died at the age of seven years. 

(V) Mary Emeline Mouck, daughter of William and Nancy (Philips) 
Mouck, married Charles Clark, as above stated. She is a Daughter of the 
American Revolution. She removed to Crafton, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1905, and purchased a fine house on Oregon avenue, where 
she still resides. 



Before the general adoption of surnames in Great Britain, 
DAVIES the Welsh people were accustomed to distinguish those bear- 
ing the same Christian name from one another by adding the 
father's name with a possessive, as "Harry's, "David's" and these were in 
time shortened and slightly varied, thus forming the very frequent names 
among those people of Williams, Jones, Harris, Davis, or Davies, etc. 

(I) Thomas Davies was born in Merthyrtydvil, Glamorganshire, Wales, 
and spent his entire life there with the exception of three years spent in 
America. He was employed in the iron mills. He married Catherine 
Howells, a daughter of Morgan Howells, who was either a brother or a 
nephew of Lord Wadleigh, whose estate is now lying idle because the direct 
line has died out. They had children : Thomas, of further mention ; John, 
William, Rees, Philip, Edward, Catherine, Mary, died in girlhood. 

(H) Thomas (2) Davies, son of Thomas (i) and Catherine (Howells) 
Davies, was born in Merthyrtydvil, Wales, in 1805, died in Chicago, Illinois, 
in 1869. He was a worker in a rolling mill, and in 1866, with his wife and 
four children, he emigrated to America to join their three eldest sons, who 
had already made their homes here. They located in Chicago, where they 
were members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Davies married, in Wales, Mary 
Williams, born in the same village as her husband, in 1815, died in Chicago, 
in 1885. She was a daughter of Rees and Mary (Richards) Williams, both 
natives of the same town, where he was a miner. They had other children: 
Susanna, married Robert Davies ; Margaret, married Samuel Richards ; 
another daughter who died in infancy. Mary (Richards) Williams was a 
daughter of Edward and Catherine (Morgan) Richards, and a granddaugh- 
ter of Sir Charles Morgan, later Lord Tredegar. Catherine (Morgan) 
Richards, in early youth, eloped with Edward Richards, a man of humbler 
birth than her own, and was disowned by her family in consequence of this 
step, the large estate going to other members of the family. The present 
Lord Tredegar, a bachelor, is a distant cousin of Mr. Davies. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davies had children: Thomas, who came to America in i860, became 
a worker in a rolling mill in Chicago, and died in that city ; Rees, who came 
a little later, died in Pueblo, Colorado, where he was the owner of a part 
of a silver mine ; Edward, died in infancy ; Catherine, married John L. 
Jones, and died at Simpson, Kansas; William, died in infancy; Edward, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 749 

who came to America early in 1866, also worked in a rolling mill in Chicago, 
and also died there; John R., of further mention; William, a steel worker 
many years, now a grocer, lives in Joliet, Illinois ; Mary, died in Wales at 
the age of seven years; Philip, died in Chicago, where he was employed as a 
superintendent in a steel mill. 

(Ill) John R. Davies, son of Thomas (2) and Mary (Williams) 
Davies, was born in Merthyrtydvil, Glamorganshire, Wales, December 22, 
1848. He acquired his education in the Aberdare public schools, then com- 
menced working in the rolling mills of the Abernant Iron Works, in Aber- 
nant, a suburb of Aberdare. In 1866 he came to America with the others 
of the family, and found employment in rolling mills in Chicago, in which 
city he lived until 1888. From 1882 until 1885 he had held the position of 
superintendent in the rolling mill, and in April, of that last mentioned year, 
he went to La Grange, Missouri, in order to superintend the completion, of 
the construction work on the plant which his company was erecting there. 
He then returned to Chicago, as the company for which he worked had gone 
into bankruptcy, then superintended the installation of machinery for a 
company at Bridgeport, Illinois, after which he became a boss roller. In 
1888 he was in receipt of an offer from the Allegheny Bessemer Steel Com- 
pany, and in consequence of this came to Duquesne, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in order to install the machinery in their new plant. He was 
then superintendent for the company until his retirement sixteen years later, 
with the exception of a short period spent in Pottsville, while installing ma- 
chinery and reorganizing the steel mill there. He is one of the oldest men 
in his line of business. As a member of the Republican party he has served 
on the Duquesne board of health. He has built a beautiful brick residence 
at No. 315 Kennedy street, opposite the high school, and since his retire- 
ment from the steel industry has done considerable business along real 
estate lines. 

Mr. Davies married, in 1872, Sarah Ann Price, born in Ebbw Vale, 
Monmouthshire, South Wales, a daughter of Thomas Price. Her mother 
died in Wales, and in 1869 she came to America to join her father, who had 
preceded her. Mr. and Mrs. Davies have had children: Thomas P., who 
lives in Duquesne, is assistant chief mechanical engineer in the local steel 
works; Taleasen H., a physician in the State Hospital at Famhurst, Dela- 
ware; Jennie, married John Jarrett, lives in Duquesne; Edith, at home; 
John, secretary and treasurer of the Duquesne Trust Company; May, at 
home; Marian, married Howard Knapp, lives in Duquesne; Hayden, died 
at the age of eighteen months ; Alma, at home. 



Writing in her diary, September 18, 1795, Mrs. Elizabeth 
SMITH Drinker, the well-known Quakeress of Philadelphia, says- 

"Saml Smith of Bucks C'y. Saml Smith of Philada. and Sally 

Smith called this morning. Those three Smiths are in no way related it 

is I believe the most common name in Europe and North America." One 
reason for the commonness of this name is that it is one of the so-called 



750 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

trade names, being derived form the trade or work of the original owners, 
and at first being prefixed by the article "the." 

(I) Samuel Smith, who lived and died in England, was the father of: 
I. Frederick, a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also 
a coal ganger ; died in McKeesport. 2. Leonard, a horse trainer and dealer ; 
died in Pittsburgh. 3. Henry, died in early manhood in the United States. 

4. George, of further mention. 5. Eliza, died unmarried, in young woman- 
hood. 

(II) Captain George Smith, son of Samuel Smith, was born in Easton 
Parish, Wiltshire, England, June 3, 1816, died June 15, 1884. At an un- 
usually early age he learned the carpenter's trade in his native land, and at 
the age of fourteen years emigrated to the United States. There were no 
railroads at that time, and he drove overland to Zanesville, Ohio, and 
worked there as a carpenter until 1836, and then went on the Ohio river 
as a boatman. He was a large and powerfully built man, like his father, 
and well adapted to battle with the hardships which his calling brought. 
It was no long time before he was advanced to the position of pilot, and 
for thirty years he served as pilot and captain on the Monongahela and 
Ohio rivers. About 1852 he bought a house and farm in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, and his family lived in the country until 1864, when 
they removed to McKeesport. In that town he then operated a grist mill, 
and was captain of the "Dolphin" at this time. In 1866 this boat was 
burned, and Mr. Smith then engaged in the coal business with Thomas 
Fawcett. In 1882 he was elected chief of police of McKeesport, and filled 
this position until his death. His administration of affairs was universally 
commended. He was a highly respected man, never making a promise 
without due deliberation, and never breaking one. He married, in 1842, 
Mary Jones, born in Lirhory, Parish of Bedwealthy, county Monmouth, 
Wales, April 23, 1824, who came to this country with her parents when she 
was a little girl. She was a daughter of Henry and Ann Jones, born in 
Wales, where he became an ironworker. About the year 1830 they emi- 
grated to Maryland, and later went to Wheeling, West Virginia, where the 
marriage of Mrs. Smith occurred. Later Mr. and Mrs. Jones removed to 
Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a heater in a steel furnace. 
They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jones had children: i. William, deceased; was a heater in the rolling mill 
at Sharpsburg. 2. Henry, also deceased ; a heater, like his brother. 3. 
Nancy Jane, married Samuel J. Hemmingray, both now deceased ; lived 
in Covington, Kentucky, where he was the owner and operator of glass 
works. 4. Mary, who married Captain Smith, as above stated. 5. Hen- 
rietta, married Henry Mahey ; lived in Pittsburgh. 6. Susan, married S. 

5. Peterson, a retail shoe dealer of McKeesport. 7. Rose, married Wil- 
liam L. Corbett, an attorney of Clarion, Pennsylvania. Captain George 
and Mary (Jones) Smith had children: i. Thomas A., who served during 
the Civil War in Company II, Eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Reserves; 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 751 

lives in VVilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 2. Margaret, married Edwin Kline; 
lives in Peru, Indiana. 3. William II., of further mention. 4. Frank F., 
deals in real estate; lives in Seattle, Washington; married Mary Taylor. 
5. George F., lives in Port Townsend, Washington, where he is county 
commissioner; married Fannie Hardwick. 6. Victor W., the proprietor of 
a general store in Derry, Pennsylvania. 7. Nettie, married Robert Parkin ; 
lives in McKeesport. 8. Carrie, married Wallace Smith, foreman in the 
National Rolling Mill, at McKeesport. 9. Rose, married B. J. Work, foreman 
in the McKeesport Tin Plate Mill. 

(Ill) William H. Smith, son of Captain George and Mary (Jones) 
Smith, was born on South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 16, 
1848. He was educated in the public schools in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, attending them until he was twelve years of age, then worked 
with his father on the river until 1866. Soon after this he accepted a posi- 
tion in the Chess Rolling Mill in Pittsburgh, then went to Wood's Mill 
in McKeesport, where he worked twenty-four successive years as a heater. 
His health then failing, he left the mill in 1897, after which he was ap- 
pointed tax collector of McKeesport, an office he filled six years. He is 
Republican in politics, and is now one of the assessors of Allegheny county. 
He belongs to the First Baptist Church, of which he has been a trustee 
for fifteen years, and he is a member of the Junior Order of United Ameri- 
can Mechanics. He built the first house on Penney street, McKeesport, 
and has seen the town grow from a population of eighteen hundred to one 
of forty-five thousand inhabitants. He has been an industrious and thrifty 
man, and is the owner of considerable real estate. 

Mr. Smith married, January 19, 1868, Olive J. Clark, born in Ver- 
sailles township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Thomas 
and Mary Catherine (Irwin) Clark, he a native of Ireland, she born in the 
United States. He was a prominent coal merchant in McKeesport, and 
died in 1866. His widow married (second) Thomas Penney, at that time 
cashier of the First National Bank of McKeesport. Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
have had children: i. Duane P., married (first) Annie Daft, (second) 
Allie Reed ; he lives in Woodlawn, Pennsylvania, where he is superinten- 
dent of the Jones & Laughlin Mill ; he served on the board of school con- 
trollers in McKeesport for fourteen years. 2. Maud, married W. C. 
Hughes; died October 11, 1898. 3. Nellie, at home. 4. Don Corbett, un- 
married, lives in Cleveland, Ohio, where he is ticket agent for the New 
York Central Railroad Company. 



This name, which translated is "carpenter," belongs 
ZIMMERMAN to an old family of Germany, whose ancestor was 
probably a carpenter at the time surnames were 
adopted, and so took the name of his calling. 

Philip Zimmerman was born in the village of Naukircher, in February, 
1829, died March 20, 1878. There he attended the public schools, and was 



753 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

apprenticed to learn the butcher's trade. In 1854 he emigrated to America, 
and settled in Ohio, in company with his mother and his two sisters : 
Louise, who married Charles Fisher, and Caroline, who married Andrew 
Bach. Subsequently he removed to McKeesport, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, and there worked in the coal mines for a considerable length of 
time. By this means he amassed a sufficient capital to start in business in 
association with a cousin, Charles Zimmerman, and they opened a butcher 
shop. This was carried on successfully for a time, and in 1871 Philip 
Zimmerman purchased a hotel on Market street, between Second and Third 
streets, with the conduct of which he was successfully identified until his 
death in 1878. Toward the close of the Civil War he enlisted in Company 
L, Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania^ Volunteer Cavalry, and served six 
months. He was a Lutheran in his religious faith. After his death, his 
widow, a woman of remarkable business qualifications combined with the 
hardy constitution of the sturdy German race, took up his unfinished work, 
and managed the hotel until 1886. She then sold it and remodeled a hotel 
she had purchased at the comer of Eleventh avenue and Walnut street. 
By dint of thrift and economy she paid off all the debts which had been 
contracted, and after a while built a number of houses, and is now living 
retired at No. 307 Eleventh avenue. Hard and continued work seems to 
have acted as a tonic for her, for although now seventy-five years of age, she 
does not look over sixty years of age, and feels strong in proportion. She 
has not alone acquired a comfortable fortune for her own subsistence, but 
has substantially aided her children and grandchildren. She is a devout 
Roman Catholic. 

Mr. Zimmerman married, June 2^, 1858, Barbara Gross, born in Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania, March 8, 1839, '^ daughter of Peter and Margaret 
(Nye) Gross, both natives of Germany, who came to America on their 
wedding trip. He became a coal miner at Stonesburg, now Dravosburg, and 
died when about seventy years old. His wife died at the age of sixty-two 
years, and they were both members of the Catliolic Church. They had seven 
sons and five daughters, of whom the following are now living : Jacob, lives 
in Dravosburg; Kate, Barbara, who married Mr. Zimmerman; Maggie, 
Peter, Christian, Mary, Anna, Martha. Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman had 
children: i. Caroline, married Wilson Bierly, a boss in Wood's Steel Mill, 
and lives in Jenny Lind street ; they have children : Ruth and Wilson. 
2. Charles, died September 2, 1886; he married Margaret Miller, and had 
children : Caroline, died at the age of two years ; Marian, married William 
Damm, manager of the Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, at McKeesport, 
and has children : Helen, and Chester, died October 9, 1913. 3. John, is an 

electrician, and lives in Los Angeles, California; he married Lena , and 

has children : Earl and Charles. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 753 

The Matlack family has been represented in the state of 

MATLACK Pennsylvania for a number of generations, and has been 

noted for the large number of its members who have 

entered professional life, especially the medical profession, in which they 

have done much for the cause of humanity. 

Thomas Matlack was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, where his 
family had been resident many years, and where his entire life was spent. 
He was a Quaker, as his forebears had been for many generations. He 
followed the occupation of farming. He married Eliza AIcFarland, and 
had children : James M., of further mention ; Richard, a physician in Chester 
county; Frank, a physician, now deceased, who practiced in Turtle Creek, 
Pennsylvania; William, a physician of Eastern Pennsylvania; Thomas, a 
farmer of Chester county ; George, deceased ; Jane, married Jacob McFar- 
land, and lives in Philadelphia. 

Dr. James M. Matlack, son of Thomas and Eliza (McFarland) Matlack, 
was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1833, died April 22, 1877. He 
received his preparatory education in his native county, then matriculated 
at a medical college in Philadelphia, from which he was graduated with 
honor, the degree of Doctor of Medicine being conferred upon him. During 
the Civil War he was an active participant in the struggle as assistant 
surgeon. For a few years he was located in Braddock, Pennsylvania, but 
after his marriage, removed to Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and had acquired an excellent practice there, when his early death 
removed him from the scene of his activities. After his death his widow 
removed with the children to Braddock, Pennsylvania, where she lived in 
the house now occupied by her daughter, Mrs. Margaret (Matlack) Brown. 
Dr. Matlack was a member of the United Presbyterian Church. Dr. Matlack 
married, in 1868, Mary McKinney, born above the steel works, at Braddock, 
died April 4, 1913. They had children: Eliza, who died in 1891, and 
Margaret M., married William Smith Brown, the mother of two children: 
Mary Matlack and William Smith Brown Jr. 

William McKinney, grandfather of Mrs, Matlack, was born in county 
Donegal, Ireland, married there, and there all his children were born. He 
was a wealthy farmer. He died at the age of ninety-six years, leaving his 
large landed estate to his two sons. He was a strict observer of the faith of 
the United Presbyterian denomination. His children were : John, of 
further mention ; Robert, Mary, Sarah, Nancy. 

John McKinney, son of William McKinney, was eleven years of age 
when his parents removed to Albany, New York, and six years later they 
were among the first settlers at Frazier's Fields, now a part of Braddock, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was a prosperous farmer, and 
a member of the United Presbyterian Church. He married Rebecca 
McGlynn, who was a child when she came to this country from Ireland 
with her pai-ents. They had children : Martha, married William Curry, 
and lived in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania ; William, deceased ; Mary, who 



754 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

married Dr. Matlack, as above stated; Anna, married L. C. Brinton, and 
lives at Newcastle, Pennsylvania; several others, who died in infancy. 

From Ireland to eastern Pennsylvania and thence across the 
KENNY mountains to the sparsely settled regions of Allegheny county 

is the route that was traversed by Charles Kenny, a native 
of Ireland, who came to the United States in young manhood. His first 
home was in Westchester, Chester county, Pennsylvania, and he there 
married, in that county holding place in the public service as recorder. In 
1818 he and his family crossed the mountains by wagon, settling in Mifflin 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he had previously bought 
one hundred and eighteen acres of land. At the time of his settlement on 
the farm the only building standing thereon was a log house, small in size 
and in poor repair, so that one of the first works of the family was to 
provide more suitable shelter, which was soon done. Charles Kenny 
prospered in his agricultural operations, and added to his original property 
a farm adjoining it and likewise another farm in the same region, his 
death occurring in that place. His old farm is the present site of the 
Kennywood Park, a famous amusement resort. After his death his widow 
moved to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where she died aged eighty-four 
years. He married Mary Jenkins, born in Baltimore, Maryland, and had 
children: i. Charity Ann, married a Mr. Conway, and died in the west, 
her husband a man prominent in public affairs. 2. Thomas Jenkins, of 
whom further. 3. Anthony, a priest of the Roman Catholic Church, died 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 4. Charles, a Jesuit missionary, died in the 
west at an advanced age. 

(II) Thomas Jenkins Kenny, son of Charles and Mary (Jenkins) 
Kenny, was born in Westchester, Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1801, 
died July 26, 1894. He and his brother Charles, proceeded westward on 
foot in advance of the remainder of their family, and upon arriving in 
Allegheny county the two made the preliminary preparations toward 
placing the farm in order. When they were joined later by their parents 
work began in earnest and soon their land was yielding a generous harvest. 
Mr. Kenny assisted in the cultivation of the home farm for a time, and 
then began the operation of some coal land discovered within the boundaries 
of the Kenny property, becoming a pioneer in this industry and continuing 
for thirty-five years. While supplying many local dealers with a high grade 
of coal, he shipped a large quantity to ports down the river, among them 
New Orleans and Cincinnati, both ready markets and well able to accom- 
modate any quantity of which he could not dispose at home. Thomas 
Jenkins Kenny also contracted numerous other business relations in addition 
to his private interests, and attained wide prominence, being one of the 
organizers of the Braddock National Bank, whose sturdy present condition 
shows the firmness of its foundation, and was connected with the old 
Pittsburgh Bank. Papers and documents that he wrote and to which he 




S^/f/n4)/}ia^ .^t. C/le^vnA^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 755 

affixed his signature show him to have been a talented penman, his writing 
even, regular and beautiful. His activity in politics was always in the 
behalf of a candidate he deemed worthy, and not only would he not raise 
a finger to secure the honors of public office for himself but he would not 
permit his admiring friends to advance his name for such preference. He 
was, with his wife, a member of the Roman Catholic Church, both being 
buried in the cemetery at Braddock, Pennsylvania. Many of the years 
of his life were passed in Braddock, Pennsylvania, but a few years prior 
to his death he moved to Homestead, Pennsylvania, where he died. 

He married Ann McGinn, born in Ireland, died in 1886, daughter of 
Irish parents, who brought her at an early age to Pittsburgh, where she 
grew to maturity. Her parents had children: i. Ellen, took the Sister's 
vows and died in a convent. 2. John, died in the west. 3. Sarah, took the 
Sister's vows and died in a convent. 4. Ann, of previous mention, married 
Thomas Jenkins Kenny. 5. Matthew, died in Pittsburgh. Children of 
Thomas Jenkins and Ann (McGinn) Kenny: i. Charles, died in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, aged eighty years. 2. Mary, a Sister in a Cincinnati convent, 
died young. 3. Anthony Herron, of whom further. 4. Thomas, a coal 
operator, died in Homestead, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1912. 5. Annie, a 
Sister in a convent, in Cincinnati, Ohio. 6. Agnes G., married John G. Kelly, 
and resides in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 7. William P., married Mary Layton 
and they live in Indianapolis, Indiana ; two children : Mary and Margaret. 

(Ill) Anthony Herron Kenny, son of Thomas Jenkins and Ann 
(McGinn) Kenny, was born at Kennywood, Mifflin township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, November 28, 1835. He obtained his early education 
in the public schools, and was reared to manhood on the old Kenny farm, 
as a young man engaging in coal dealing with his father and brothers 
until the field, which was their source of supply, was exhausted, a condition 
it reached about 18S1. Moving to Homestead, Pennsylvania, he was for 
several years a coal dealer in that place, the pressure of privat*^ affairs and 
the administration of his estate causing his retirement from that line of 
endeavor. He is affiliated with numerous business enterprises in Allegheny 
county, among his interests being a stockholder of the Monongahela Trust 
Company, of which he was an organizer. He was at one time the proprietor 
of a small and unpretentious picnic-ground at Kennywood, a locality deriv- 
ing its name from the family, in its place having grown up Kennywood 
Park, an amusement center of wide fame, patronized during the summer 
season by vast crowds of pleasure seekers. Mr. Kenny is a Democrat in 
political faith, and with his wife affiliated with St. Mary Magdalene's 
Roman Catholic Church. 

Mr. Kenny married, in 1870, Mary Josephine Maggini, born in Ohio, 
for many years a resident of Dayton and Brown county, Ohio. Children : 
I. Ann, lives at home. 2. Mary, lives at home. 3. Florence A., married 
Dr. A. F. Walsh, and resides in Crafton, Pennsylvania; children: Mary 
Louise, Richard Ennis, Jane, Josephine A. 4. Albert A., for many years 



756 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

manager of a hardware store, lives at home. 5. Stella, lives at home. 
6. Thomas J., a real estate dealer, lives at home. 7. Marian, lives at home. 
8. Ruth, married Clement Cochran, an expert machinist and salesman, and 
resides in Buffalo, New York. 



From Alsace, that province so long a bone of 
WINTERBERGER contention between Germany and France and one 

whose fate now hangs in the balance, came Nicholas 
Winterberger to Western Pennsylvania, in 1864. He was born in Alsace, 
then belonging to France, in 1830, was educated in French schools and 
served seven years in the French army. He was a farmer in his native 
land, and after coming to the Pittsburgh district, in 1864, continued that 
occupation on an Allegheny county farm. Later he worked in the steel 
mills owned by Jones & Laughlin for six years, then bought a farm in 
Franklin township, on which he lived until his death in September, 1912. 
He was the only one of his family to come to the United States, except a 
brother who came some years afterwards, went to St. Louis and was not 
again heard from. The family were Roman Catholics in religion. Nicholas 
Winterberger married Catherine Fernbach, who died July 20, 1903. Chil- 
dren: I. Catherine, deceased; married George Grieshaber. 2. John, died 
unmarried. 3. Nicholas (2). 4. Mary, died in infancy. 5. Mark, died in 
infancy. 6. George, died in infancy. 7. A son, died unnamed. 8. Andrew 
James, of whom further. 

Andrew James Winterberger, son of Nicholas and Catherine (Fern- 
bach) Winterberger, was born on his father's farm on Big Sewickley 
creek, Franklin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, September 29, 
1873. He was educated in the public schools of the township, and until the 
age of twenty-two years was his father's assistant on the farm. In 1895 
he opened a general store in Franklin township, near Sewickley, which he 
has conducted most successfully until the present time. He also owns and 
operates his farm of seventy-five acres, his home and store being on the 
same farm. He is a wide-awake, capable man of business and as merchant 
and farmer ranks with the successful solid men of the township. He is a 
Republican in politics, and a member of the Roman Catholic Church. 
Mr. Winterberger married, January 20, 1904, Susanna Sloop, born October 
3, 1878, daughter of John and Margaret Sloop. Children: Ambrose John, 
born December 9, 1904; Bernard Frederick, June 4, 1907 ; Margaret, October 
14, 1909; Joseph, January 14, 1912. 



The American record of this branch of the German family 
MITESSER of Mitesser is so brief that any considerable narative of 

the family history would of necessity deal with its life in 
the homeland. This chronicle begins with the grandfather of John 
Mitesser, of Glenshaw, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Adam Mitesser, a 
farmer of Germany, who attained the wonderful age of ninety-eight years. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 757 

He married and had children, one of his sons being Frank, of whom further. 

(II) Frank Mitesser, son of Adam Mitesser, was born in Germany, 
and there passed his entire life. His occupation was that of farmer. He 
married Lora, daughter of John Stumph, her father a farmer of Germany, 
and had children: i. George, lives in Germany, a farmer. 2. Barbara, lives 
in her native land. 3. John, of whom further. 

(III) John Mitesser, son of Frank and Lora (Stumph) Mitesser, was 
born in Germany, October 28, 1858. He was there educated, and soon 
after attaining his majority emigrated to the United States, settling first 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and then moving to Westmoreland 
county. He was in the latter locality but one summer, after which he was 
for fifteen months employed on a farm in Iowa, subsequently coming east- 
ward to Milwaukee. Two months later he went to the northern part of the 
state of Wisconsin, remaining there for four months, passing the next three 
and one-half years employed in a brewery in Milwaukee. For one year 
after his marriage in 1886 he remained in Milwaukee, then spent a like 
period of time in Minnesota, after which he returned to Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and for twenty-six years rented land in Shaler township, on 
w'hich he conducted gardening operations. In 1905 he purchased his 
present tract of ten acres in this same township, and continues gardening 
in that place to the present time. He is a member of St. Anthony's Roman 
Catholic Church. 

Mr. Mitesser married a widow, Augusta Louisa (Gantz) Hauk, who 
was the mother of four children: Joseph, Martin, Theresa, married a 
William Elder Jr., Emma, married Adam Hufnagel Jr. Children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Mitesser: Alvin, John M., August, George. 



The founder of the Soose family of Germany in Pennsylvania, 
SOOSE Godlip Soose, a native of Germany, was a blacksmith by trade, 

and after coming to the United States settled in Pittsburgh, 
his home being on Perrysville avenue. After moving to Shaler township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, he purchased a tract of eight acres, and 
when not busied in his shop, he gave his time to its cultivation. His land 
holdings gradually increased in size until he was the owner of forty-two 
acres, on which he lived until his death. He married Anna Leichner, and 
had children, one of his sons George, of whom further. 

(II) George Soose, son of Godlip and Anna (Leichner) Soose, was 
born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was educated 
in the schools of that township. He mastered the trade of blacksmith, and 
also became employed in gardening, in 1895 purchasing his present place 
of thirty acres. He made improvements and enlargements upon the build- 
ings thereon, and in addition to raising vegetables for the city market 
became a fruit grower, his orchards well kept and giving a profitable annual 
yield. He now lives retired upon the home farm, his son, George, having 
assumed the r-esponsibility of its management. He and his family are 



758 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

communicants of the Lutheran Church. George Soose married Ann, born 
in Germany, daughter of Wilham and Ann Keshner, her parents also natives 
of Germany, her father, Wilham Keshner, a stone mason by trade, and after 
locating at Troy Hill, Pennsylvania, became a gardener on a tract of fourteen 
acres. Children of George and Ann (Keshner) Soose: i. Andrew, de- 
ceased. 2. John, lives on the home farm. 3. Elizabeth, deceased. 4. Minnie, 
lives at home. 5. George, died in infancy. 6. George, of whom further. 
7. Mary, lives at home. 

(Ill) George (2) Soose, son of George (i) and Ann (Keshner) Soose, 
was born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, June 31, 
1891. He was a student in the schools of his native township, and has 
passed his entire life on the home farm, the management of which fell upon 
him when he attained man's estate. Schooled in his duties through boy- 
hood training, the additional responsibility has not weighed heavily upon 
him, and he has taken place among the successful agriculturists of the 
locality. 



Robert Fowler, of Scotch-Irish descent, was one of the first 
FOWLER settlers of Marshall township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he owned and cleared considerable land. He 
was a member of the United Presbyterian Church, which he served as 
elder for forty years. He married and had issue : John H., of further 
mention; Joseph, killed in the Civil War; William, Ellen, Rosina, Matilda. 

(II) John H. Fowler, son of Robert Fowler, was born in Marshall 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, was there educated and grew 
to manhood, his father's assistant. During the first ten years after leaving 
home he was a riverman on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, later settling 
on a farm in Marshall township. He was a justice of the peace for twenty 
years, a school director, member of the United Presbyterian Church, and 
a Democrat in politics. He married Matilda, daughter of James Sample, 
of Marshall township. Children : Rosina, Charles, Robert, deceased, John, 
deceased, Jennie, deceased, Fannie, Thomas, William J., of further mention. 

(III) William J. Fowler, son of John H. and Matilda (Sample) 
Fowler, was born in Marshall township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, May I, 1864. He was educated in the public schools, and 
spent his early life at the home farm. When starting in life for himself, 
he went to the oil fields and for twelve years worked as an oil pumper. He 
then returned to Marshall county, where for twenty-six years he has been 
engaged in general farming, owning his own land. He is a Democrat in 
politics and for twelve years has served as school director. He is a member 
of the National Union, the Order of Moose, and of the United Presbyterian 
Church. Mr. Fowler married, in April, 1889, Susan, daughter of James 
Sarver, of Pine Creek, Pennsylvania. Children, all living with their parents 
and unmarried: Stella, Blanche, Chester, Earl, Ethel. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 759 

The Leezer family, represented in the present generation by 

LEEZER Charles A. Leezer, a prominent citizen of McKeesport, has 

long been actively and prominently identified with the interests 

of the state of Pennsylvania, several generations of the family having 

resided there. 

(I) Daniel Leezer, grandfather of Charles A. Leezer, was among the 
early settlers of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, from whence he removed 
to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he resided until his death, 
which occurred about the year 1863. His wife, Sarah (Hendricks) Leezer, 
who was a cousin of Vice-President Hendricks, bore him six children : 
Eli, Esther, Peter, Margaret, John, Jacob G., all deceased. 

(H) Jacob G. Leezer, son of Daniel Leezer, was born in Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, July 5, 1824, died in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
December 23, 191 1. Li early life he was employed in a saw mill, later was 
engaged in the coal business, and subsequently was an extensive lumber 
dealer, retiring from that line of work in the latter part of his life and 
thenceforth devoting his time to the management of his property in 
McKeesport, he having acquired considerable real estate as the result of 
his years of hard toil. He resided on Fifth avenue, McKeesport, for half 
a century, and erected the house in which his son, Charles A., resides, 
located at No. 115 Fifth avenue, about the year 1891. He was one of the 
organizers of the People's Bank of McKeesport, and for many years served 
in the various offices of president, vice-president and director. He was a 
Republican in politics, but never sought or held public office, and was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a member of the Knights 
of the Mystic Chain, organizer and treasurer of the Grand Lodge for 
twenty-one years, and treasurer of the Supreme Lodge. He married Agnes 
Jane Heath, born in Lincoln township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
February 2, 1831, died July 19, 1910, daughter of Henry and Nancy (Kelly) 
Heath, both of whom lived and died in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
the latter named having been one of the organizers of the First Methodi.st 
Episcopal Church of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. Mr. Heath was a farmer. 
He and his wife were the parents of eight children: Sebre, deceased; 
Hezekiah, deceased; Rachel, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Agnes Jane, de- 
ceased ; Mary A., deceased ; Samuel W., Henry G., deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leezer were the parents of seven children : Henry A. ; E. Frank, died 
November 12, 1883, aged twenty-eight years; Nancy Bell, widow of John 
A. Woods, resides on Eighth street, McKeesport; Samutl J., a resident of 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; Sarah J., wife of John W. Sawert, of East 
End, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Charles A., of whom further; Tillie G., 
wife of George R. McAbee, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

(HI) Charles A. Leezer, son of Jacob G. Leezer, was born in McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1868. He obtained a practical education by 
attendance at the public schools of his native city, and upon the completion 
of his studies he devoted his attention to securing a thorough knowledge 



76o WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

of the mastery of a boat, and from that time to the present (1914) has 
been a master and pilot on the river, which has proven a remunerative 
source of income. He is the owner of the old homestead, which is one of 
the attractive places of abode in that section of the state. He is a stock- 
holder in the People's Bank, and a member of Aliquippa Lodge, No. 375, 
Free and Accepted Masons, of McKeesport, McKeesport Chapter, No. 282, 
Royal Arch Masons, and McKeesport Commandery, No. 86, Knights 
Templar. He is a Republican in politics. All enterprises that tend toward 
the development and welfare of the community receive from him a hearty 
support. 

Mr. Leezer married, November 7, 1900, Katharine Boyd, of Elizabeth, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Captain Robert AL and Mary (McCune) Boyd. 
They are the parents of one child, Charles Boyd, born July 7, 1905. 



The Denny family, like a large proportion of the inhabitants 
DENNY of the United States, is of that sturdy and reliable Irish stock 

which has contributed so much to the prosperity of the entire 
country, and whose sterling traits of character are worthy of being followed. 
Timothy Denny was born in county Carey, Ireland, and after the birth 
of his two eldest children removed to London, England, where he was 
engaged in business as a merchant, and died in 1859. He married, in 
Ireland, Helen McGillicuddy, who died in McKeesport, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1882. She came to America with six children in 1870. 
She and her husband were of the Catholic faith, and in McKeesport she 
became a member of St. Peter's Church. Children, the four youngest born 
in England: John, a decorator, died in McKeesport in 1882; Timothy, 
died at the age of twenty-one years in London, England ; Thomas, a con- 
tractor, died in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1890; Eugene, a merchant, died in 
McKeesport; Frank, a merchant, died in McKeesport in 1908; William 
John, of further mention. 

William John Denny, son of Timothy and Helen (McGiUicuddy) 
Denny, was born in London, England, December 24, 1858. His school 
education was commenced in England, and was completed in the night 
schools of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, while he was learning the trade of 
glass blowing. Upon his return to McKeesport, where his brothers were 
already established in the wholesale liquor business, he joined them in this 
line of business, and as they dropped out, one by one, he took over their 
share of the business until he became the sole proprietor of what is now 
the oldest wholesale liquor business in McKeesport. He is, however, 
actively identified with other business enterprises, and is a stockholder in 
the Tube City Brewing Company, also a stockholder in The Thomas 
Moore Distilling Company, and also on the board of directors of the 
Duquesne Bridge Company. He was one of the organizers of the last 
mentioned corporation, operating a toll bridge, and has also assisted in 
organizing a number of other companies for various purposes. He is 




Cy0- 




WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 761 

independent in his political views, and has the courage of his convictions. 
He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles, and his religions affiliation is with St. Peter's 
Roman Catholic Church. 

Mr. Denny married, in 1892, Caroline, born in Germany, a daughter 
of Peter and Caroline Koch, and a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic 
Church. They have had children: Genevieve, who died at the age of 
twenty-one years ; Alice, Lillian, William, Caroline, Helen, Anna. 



John Wesley Bailie, an eminent lawyer, bank official and 
BAILIE business man of McKeesport for many years, was the young- 
est son of John and Forbes (Dickson J Bailie, of Elizabeth 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

John Wesley Bailie was born in Elizabeth township, June 9, 1846, 
died in Pittsburgh, October 16, 1910. After acquiring a good public school 
education, he began the study of law, entering the law department of the 
University of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated and authorized 
to practice at the Pennsylvania bar. He began practice in McKeesport 
in association with James Evans, who later became his brother-in-law. 
He was later engaged in practice with John D. Schafer, who subsequently 
was elected a judge of the court of common pleas, of Allegheny county. 
In 1883 he formed an association with Frank Thompson, that was only 
terminated by death. Mr. Bailie was not actively in practice during the 
later years, but the partnership existed uninterrupted for over a quarter 
of a century. He was admitted to practice in all state and federal courts 
of the district, was a member of the National State and County Bar 
Associations, and was one of the strong men of the Allegheny county bar. 
He possessed the entire confidence of his large clientele and was held in 
high esteem by his professional brethren. While devoted entirely to his 
profession, for many years he had large outside interests to which in his 
later years he gave most of his time. He was a director of the First 
National Bank, of McKeesport, for over twenty years, and vice-president 
from 1903 until his death in 1910. He was president of the Schoenberger 
Coal Company, and vice-president of the Tennessee Valley Iron and 
Railroad Company, and to these his legal learning and executive ability 
was of incalculable benefit. He was interested in church and charitable 
work as well, serving the Presbyterian Church as eld,er and trustee for 
twenty-five years, and McKeesport Hospital as a director. 

Mr. Bailie married, April 22, 1875, Anna M. Evans, who died March 
22, 1906, daughter of Oliver and Mary (Sampson) Evans. With the 
exception of about four years spent at Rosement, a suburb of Philadelphia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bailie spent their married life in McKeesport. She was a 
graduate of Vassar College, class of 1868, the first graduating class of 
that college. After her death the family moved to No. 240 Bellefield 
avenue, Pittsburgh, where Mr. Bailie died. Children: i. Mary Evans, 



762 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

a graduate of Vassar in 1897, died in December, 191 1. 2. Robert, died by 
drowning in 1888. 3. Cadwallader, drowned with his brother. 4. John 
Wesley, received the degree of B. S., Princeton University, class of 1902. 
5. Thomas Sampson, A. B., Princeton, 1902. 6. Anna F., a graduate of 
Vassar in 1908, resides in Pittsburgh with her brother Thomas Sampson. 
7. Raymond L., a graduate from Princeton, B. S., 1913, resides in Pitts- 
burgh with his brother and sister. 

Thomas Sampson Bailie, fourth son of John Wesley and Anna M. 
(Evans) Bailie, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, February 8, 
1882. He was educated at Shady Side Academy (Pittsburgh) and Princeton 
University, graduate of the latter institution, A. B., class of 1902. After 
leaving college he entered the employ of the Shoenberger Coal Company, 
as salesman, and after the consolidation of that company with the West- 
moreland and Blaine Coal Companies, remained with the consolidation in 
the same capacity. In 1910 he was appointed general sales manager, a 
position he now fills most efficiently. He is also a director of the Tennessee 
Valley Iron and Railroad Company and interested in other enter- 
prises of perhaps minor importance. He is a Republican in politics, and 
a member of the University and Athletic clubs of Pittsburgh, his home. 
He is unmarried. 



The Eger family is an old and highly respected one, their 
EGER record being that of well-spent lives, characterized by industry, 

honesty, integrity and faithfulness in the discharge of every 
duty devolving upon them. 

Michael Eger was born in Germany, where he was a farmer and 
spent his entire life. He was also an extensive land owner, and a man 
of considerable influence in the community in which he resided. He and his 
wife were members of the Catholic Church. They had children : Kuni- 
gunde, married, and died in Germany; Margaret and Catherine, also mar- 
ried and died in Germany; Barbara, came to America, married Peter 
Schmidt, and died in New York; Elizabeth, married and died in Germany; 
Joseph, of further mention. Michael Eger married Barbara Rust, also of 
German birth. 

Joseph Eger, son of Michael and Barbara (Rust) Eger, was born in 
Byron, Germany, November i, 1849. There he received a practical and 
substantial education in the public schools, and while he was still a young 
lad commenced working as a cooper in a brewery, and later was employed in 
the brewery proper. During the Franco-Prussian war of 1870-71, he was 
in active service, and during his period of three years was never wounded. 
At the close of the war he was married, and then was at work on the railroad 
for about ten years. In April, 1883, he emigrated to America, and upon 
his arrival in this country settled in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. During 
the first seventeen years he worked in Dewees Woods Steel Mills. In the 
meantime his wife had opened a grocery store on Versailles avenue, and 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 763 

during his spare time Mr. Eger assisted her in the conduct of this enter- 
prise. They were frugal and industrious, and by means of their combined 
efforts amassed a competence which enabled them to retire from business 
in 1902. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are members 
of St. Mary's Catholic Church. He is also a member of the Catholic Mutual 
Benefit Association. All of his children are in prosperous circumstances 
and the owners of considerable property. 

Mr. Eger married, in 1873, Katherine, born in Germany, a daughter of 
George and Anna Shafer, who lived and died in Germany. They had chil- 
dren, of whom the six eldest were born in Germany: John, lives on his own 
farm at Pattenburg, New Jersey ; Lewis, in the butcher business at Orange, 
New Jersey; George, engaged in the real estate business at Reading, Penn- 
sylvania; Sebastian, a retired grocer, lives at McKeesport; Efifie, married 
Frederick Lamp; Katie, married August Franklin, and lives in McKeesport; 
Joseph, died about 1906; Anna, married Joseph Judy, and lives in McKees- 
port ; Frank, a grocer of McKeesport ; two others died in infancy in Germany. 



The late Edward Taylor, a prosperous, respected farmer of 
TAYLOR North Versailles township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
was born, lived and died on the homestead farm. He was the 
son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Bosler) Taylor, of Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, who after their marriage bought a farm of over two hundred acres 
in North Versailles township, then largely in a state of nature. Isaac Tay- 
lor cleared and improved his purchase by the erection of a suitable building 
yet standing and by a careful tilling of the soil improving rather than de- 
creasing its fertility. He cultivated the farm with the aid of his sons and 
retained its management until his death in 1875, aged eighty-one years. 
His wife survived him one year, her age at death seventy-one years. He 
was a man of quiet and retiring disposition, industrious and faithful to all 
his obligcttions. Isaac Taylor married (first) Margaret Larimer, who bore 
him three children: i. Catherine, married James Robinson, and died in 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 2. Caroline, married William Carothers, and died 
in Uniontown. 3. Margaret, married Dr. William Irwin, and died in 
Stewartsville, Pennsylvania. He married (second) Elizabeth Bosler, who 
bore him fourteen children: 4. Henry, was a farmer of North Versailles, 
deceased. 5. Robert, was a lumber and grain dealer of West Newton, Penn- 
sylvania, deceased. 6. Hettie, married Hamilton Larimer, and died in 
Stewartsville, Pennsylvania. 7. John, was a farmer of Illinois, deceased. 
8. William, a farmer of Iowa. 9. Elizabeth, now residing at the old home- 
stead in North Versailles township. 10. Clara, died at the age of forty-five 
years after a life spent on the old homestead, unmarried. 11. James, resid- 
ing at the homestead farm, unmarried. 12. Joseph, now a farmer of West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. 13. Edward, of further mention. Four 
other children died in infancy. 

(II) Edward Taylor, thirteenth child of Isaac Taylor and tenth by his 
second wife, Elizabeth (Bosler) Taylor, was born on the North Versailles 



764 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

township farm, August 20, 1857, died there July 14, 1909. He attended 
pubHc schools during his youth, and aided in the work of the farm until 
he entered the State Normal School at Millersville, Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he pursued advanced courses of study. At his father's 
death he and his brother James purchased the interests of the other heirs 
in the estate, and from that time until the death of Edward, the brothers 
owned and cultivated the home farm, containing now about two hundred 
and fifty acres. The brothers brought the soil to a high state of productive- 
ness and prospered in all their undertakings. James Taylor survives his 
brother and manages the property, of which he is a part owner. The home- 
stead built by Isaac Taylor has been remodeled and enlarged, modern 
features added, making it a most desirable country residence. Edward 
Taylor was a member of the East McKeesport Presbyterian Church, as is 
his widow, and from the date of its erection until his death was its honored 
treasurer. In political faith he was a Republican, but his great interest 
was his family and farm, taking little active part in public affairs. 

Mr. Taylor married, December 24, 1890, Rebecca Montgomery, bom 
near Turtle Creek, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Lewis) Montgomery, the latter a daughter of Ezra and Martha 
(Hillman) Lewis, all old residents of Allegheny county. John Montgomery 
was a farmer, and both he and his wife died in the county of their birth. 
Mrs. Rebecca (Montgomery) Taylor survives her husband and continues 
her residence at the old Taylor farm where she first went as a bride twenty- 
four years ago and where she spent almost nineteen years of happy married 
life. She has no children. 



Ulrich Mysel Mikaloff was born in Holland, but early in 
MIKALOFF life migrated to Sweden, where he spent all the remainder 

of his life. He was in the employ of the government, 
being a police official at Hoganas, and died in that town. He married a 
native of Sweden, had a number of children, none of whom came to America, 
but many of his grandchildren made their homes here. 

(II) Ferdinand Mikaloff, son of Ulrich Mysel Mikaloff, was born in 
Hoganas, Sweden, and there grew up and became a blaster in the mines. 
Later he became a member of the police force of the town. He and his 
wife were members of the Lutheran Church. He married Helena Osterman. 
Avhose father was a potter in Hoganas, and had five children, all of whom 
died in Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Mikaloff had children : Maria, married 
Nils Ohlin, now deceased, and lives in Christianstad. Sweden; Nils, lives in 
Allegheny City, Pennsylvania; John P., died in infancy; John P., the second 
of the name, of further mention ; Cecelia, married and died in Copenhagen, 
Denmark ; Helena, lives in Helsingor, Denmark ; Sophia, lives in America ; 
Alexander, lives in McKeesport. 

(III) John P. Mikaloff, son of Ferdinand and Helena (Osterman) 
Mikaloff, was born in Hoganas, Sweden, March 5, 1852. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native land, then found employment in the coal 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 765 

mines. In 1872 he emigrated to America, and settled at Irwin Station, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where he worked in the coal mines 
for one year. Removing to Elizabeth, he continued in this occupation, and 
after a time worked in the mines in Coal Valley and then at Lovedale. Be- 
coming acquainted with Jack Lawson, he learned the art of photography, 
then sailed for Sweden, where he opened a photograph gallery in his native 
town, and conducted this enterprise for one year. He then returned to 
America, and resumed mining until 1877. In February of that year, in 
association with Jack Lawson, he went to England, where they followed 
"feasts and fairs" during the summer season, until October. After that he 
worked four weeks in the coal mines of Yorkshire, and again returned to 
Coal Valley, and continued mining until 1891. In May, 1891, he settled in 
Duquesne, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there opened a grocery store 
on Duquesne avenue, remained there two years, then removed to Hamilton 
avenue and Fourth street. Later he erected a store building, continuing in 
business until 191 1, at which time he was one of the oldest business men in 
the town. In 1890 he had erected a house at Fourth street and Hamilton 
avenue, and this has been his home up to the present time. He is a strong 
Republican, having become a citizen in 1884, and is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Mr. Mikalofif married (first) June 6, 1879, Elizabeth, born in Mifflin 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, died November 13, 1895, a daugh- 
ter of George and Mary (Lock) Barnes. He married (second) January, 
1897, Emma Anderson, born in Sweden, came to America about 1892 to 
join her sister, who had preceded her. She is a daughter of Anders and 
Fredericka Anderson, who lived in Nerrike, Sweden, where he was a brick- 
layer. They had eight children, of whom the only ones to come to America 
were : Emma, who married Mr. Mikaloff : and Matilda, came to America 
about 1890, settled at McKeesport, and married Otto Byrath, their only 
child being Herbert. Mr. and Mrs. Mikaloff have had children : Mary 
Alice, married Samuel Gordon, a grocer in Duquesne ; George Ferdinand, 
foreman of the locomotive works of the Carnegie Steel Company, lives in 
Duquesne; Helena, married Earl Holden. and both died in Duquesne; Wil- 
liam Oscar, a partner in the store with Samuel Gordon ; Grace Elizabeth, 
married Clarence Jones, and lives in Duquesne ; John P. Jr., a student in 
the electrical engineering department of the State College; Ray, died in 
infancy. 



The great empire of Germany has furnished the 

GOLDSTROHM United States with many citizens of ability and worth, 

who have brought to this country those characteristics 

of thrift and industry which are so distinctive of the German race, and which 

have aided so materially in upbuilding and upholding the prosperity of the 

land. 

Conrad Goldstrohm, born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, about 1808, 
died in Mifflin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1898. After 



766 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the death of his wife in Germany, he emigrated to America in 1854, bringing 
with him his two sons and only daughter. He settled in Mifflin township, 
where he was engaged in mining coal for a time, then he and his sons pur- 
chased a farm of two hundred and thirty acres in Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania, which was partially improved. Later he sold his interest to his 
sons and returned to Mifflin township, where he lived in retirement until his 
death. He was a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church. He 

married , also a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, and had children : Conrad 

William, of further mention ; Henry, who died on the farm in Armstrong 
county in 1912; Mary, married Adam Heidelman, and died in Duquesne, 
Pennsylvania. 

Conrad William Goldstrohm, son of Conrad Goldstrohm, was born in 
Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, March 23, 1834, died in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1877. The public schools in the vicinity of his birthplace 
furnished him with an excellent practical education, and his early years were 
spent on a farm. He was about twenty years of age when he arrived in this 
country, and at once engaged in coal mining, with which he was identified 
until the purchase of the farm in Armstrong county, which he cultivated for 
a time. He then returned to Allegheny county, and was engaged in coal 
mining until his death, but retained his interest in the Armstrong county 
farm. He was very thrifty and successful, and was also the owner of three 
fine houses in Mifflin township. A strong Democrat politically, he was a 
member of the Lutheran Church, and of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Mr. Goldstrohm married, January i, 1861, a distant relative, Barbara 
Goldstrohm, born May 24, 1840, in Hesse-Darmstadt, a daughter of Yost 
and Catherine Goldstrohm, the last mentioned dying in Germany, after which 
the father with his four children came to America in i860, and settled in 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and died in Elizabethtown. Since the death 
of her husband Mrs. Goldstrohm has been living in Duquesne and McKees- 
port. Mr. and Mrs. Goldstrohm have had children: i. Conrad A., a baker 
in Duquesne ; married Louisa Werner, born in Wuerttemberg, Germany, 
came to America in 1891, a daughter of Michael and Catherine Werner; 
children: Conrad, Henry, Anna, Leonard, Louise, Albert. 2. August, a 
contractor, resides in the old home in Duquesne ; married Kate Garber, and 
has children : Ernest, Marie. Catherine, Edward, Barbara and Elsie, twins. 
3. Mary, married Michael Seger, lives in McKeesport, and has children: 
Barbara and Catherine. 



Our nation is so unmistakably cosmopolitan in its social makeup 
GLESS that it can scarcely be said that we have as yet developed a dis- 
! tinctive American type, although the amalgamation and assimila- 

tion of varied elements is proceeding day by day and year by year. Many 
of our most loyal and valued citizens are of foreign birth and breeding, and 
their positions in their respective communities entitle them to recognition for 
sterling worth and marked usefulness. The members of the Gless family, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 7(^7 

.of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, are of this caliber, and have added to the 
reputation for good citizenship. 

John Gless, who was born in Germany, spent his entire life in that 
country. He was a farmer, owning forty acres of land, and was a man of 
influence in his community. He married Mary Becht, and they had chil- 
dren: Caroline, who lives in France; Felix, of further mention; Ernestine, 
married Charles Shawn; Emeline, married John Korper, lives in Germany; 
Mary, deceased ; Charles, lives with his brother Felix on the homestead in 
Shaler township, and is engaged in gardening. 

Felix Gless, son of John and Mary (Becht) Gless, was born in Germany 
in 1 861, and there acquired a substantial education. He emigrated to 
America in 1879, and settled at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, where he worked 
in iron and steel mills for many years. About the year 1904 he purchased a 
farm of twelve acres, at Glenshaw, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and 
engaged in market gardening, with which he is still successfully identified. 
He is independent in his political opinions, and a consistent member of the 
Catholic Church. He married, February 11, 1888, Savina, a daughter of 
John and Barbara (Pfaff) Pfaff, of Germany, and a sister of Peter, in 
Germany; Frank, in Germany. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Gless are: 
Anna, born December 2, 1890, married John Wolfram; Kathryn, born July 
18, 1892; Matilda, born December 20, 1894; Edward, born November 10, 
1898; Philomena, born February 19, 1901. 



The Bertsch family has only been represented in this country 
BERTSCH a comparatively few years, but the various members have 
already proved their worth as good citizens. 

Augustus Bertsch was born in Russian Poland, December 15, 1841, and 
has never come to this country. He is a farmer and a carpenter. He mar- 
rier Minnie Marten, who died June 22, 1912, and they had children : Dophelia, 
Augustus, Frederick, of further mention ; Ernestina, Daniel. All of these 
came to America. 

Frederick Bertsch, son of Augustus and Minnie (Marten) Bertsch, 
was born in Russian Poland, December 22, 1866. He was a young lad 
when he emigrated to the United States, had his own way to make in the 
world, and owes his present prosperity and influence in the world solely to 
his own efforts. He commenced working as a gardener, and being of an 
active, energetic nature, as well as thrifty, he has won his way to a com- 
fortable fortune. At first he was in Reserve township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, came to Shaler township in 1902, and there purchased nine 
acres of land. On this he raises a large variety of garden truck, and has 
also erected a greenhouse. His children now assist in the work he has so 
ably organized, and his wife takes much pride in her chicken farm, on which 
there are about three hundred at the present time. Mr. Bertsch married 
Ernestine Hilf, and their children are: Lydia, Laura, Theodore. Frederick, 
Olga. 



768 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The Walton family of Braddock, Allegheny county, Penn- 
WALTON sylvania, is of English origin, and has been resident here 
since the middle of the nineteenth century. 

Utrick Walton, born in Cumberland, England, spent his entire life in 
his native land. He married Isabella Dickenson. 

Joseph D. Walton, son of Utrick and Isabella (Dickenson) Walton, 
was born in Cumberland, England, June 9, 1830. When he was seventeen 
years of age, in company with his sister and her husband, he emigrated to 
the United States, the two last mentioned returning to England after a 
short stay here. Mr. Walton located in Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was engaged in farming until 1873, when he took up 
teaming in Braddock. He established himself in the livery business about 
1883, and has been successfully identified with this enterprise since that 
time. His residence is on Pitcairn street, while his place of business is 
located on Verona street, Braddock. He has been called upon to face the 
inevitable depressions which confront every business man at times, but he 
has invariably weathered the storm, and the successes largely outnumber the 
failures in his business career. He and his family are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church. In political belief Mr. Walton is a Democrat. Mr. 
Walton married, in 1861, Catherine Bell, of Pittsburgh, and they have had 
children: i. Margaret, deceased. 2. Belle, married William Porter, de- 
ceased, and has children : Katherine, Marian, Charles and William J. 
Bryan. 3. Sarah M., a teacher in the Fourth Ward School, Braddock, 
lives at home. 4. Wilburt, engaged in the livery business ; is a Knight of the 
Maccabees; married Carrie Reithmiller, born near Pittsburgh, and they 
have children : Wilburt Vernon, Grace, Joseph Chester, Edna, Gladys, 
Florence, Alice, Irene. 5. John B., a tinner. 6. Katherine. The two last 
mentioned are unmarried and live with their parents. 



The men who claim foreign lands as their birthplace are 
BRUCKNER among the best citizens of this republic, men who are 

willing to give their lives if necessary in time of peril, 
and among this number must be mentioned William Andrew Bruckner, a 
well-to-do citizen of McKeesport. 

William Bruckner, father of William Andrew Bruckner, was a native 
of Germany, in which country he was reared, educated, spent his entire 
lifetime and died, as did also his wife, Charlotte (Richder) Bruckner, who 
bore him six children, as follows: Johanna, died in infancy; Christianna; 
William Andrew, of whom further; Henry, twin of William Andrew, died 
in Germany, in 1908, aged sixty-ane years; Augusta; Herman, died in 
infancy. 

William Andrew Bruckner was born in Germany, September 25, 1847. 
He attended the common schools in the vicinity of his home, thus obtaining 
a practical education, after which he served an apprenticeship at the trade 
of stone contractor, being engaged in that line of work in his native land up 
to the year 1882, when he emigrated to the United States, settling in Mc- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 769 

Keesport, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the same business, building 
up a splendid trade, his transactions being conducted in a thoroughly work- 
manlike manner. In 1899 he retired from active pursuits, having accum- 
ulated sufficient capital to spend his declining years in comfort and ease, 
the fitting sequel to a life of activity and toil. He is the owner of con- 
siderable property in addition to the house in which he resides, located at 
No. 804 South Evans avenue, McKeespoft. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church of McKeesport, and casts his vote for the candidates 
of the Republican party. He is interested in all that pertains to the general 
good of the community, and in every way fulfills his obligations as a true 
citizen. 

Mr. Bruckner married, in Germany, November 17, 1875, Caroline 
Schalk, of Germany, born November 17, 1844, daughter of Theodore Wil- 
liam and Marie (Nella) Schalk. Children: William, Hugo, Oscar, Lena, 
Marie, all of whom are living at the present time (1914). 



The family of Harding, well and favorably known in Mc- 

HARDING Keesport and vicinity, its members ranking among the most 

substantial and representative citizens of that section of the 

state, is worthily represented in the present generation by Albert J. Harding, 

a musician of considerable note. 

John Harding, father of Albert J. Harding, was born in England, was 
there reared, educated and married, and in the latter part of the year 1879 
emigrated to this country, settling in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and there 
entered the employ of the National Tube Company, remaining with them 
until the time of his decease, in the year 1900. His widow, Mary (Sweet) 
Harding, is living at the present time (1914). During their residence in 
England they attended the Methodist Episcopal Church, but after their ar- 
rival in McKeesport they joined St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, taking an 
active part in its varied interests. Mr. Harding was a Republican in 
politics. Their children were as follows: i. Mary, wife of Thomas Biddle- 
stone, baggage master of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 2. Anna Louisa, died 
in May, 1912; she was the wife of William Andrews and had a child, Wil- 
liam. 3. George, died in infancy. 4. Albert J., of whom further. 

Albert J. Harding was born in England, April 5, 1872. He accompanied 
his parents to the LTnited States when seven years of age, and his educa- 
tion was obtained in the public and high schools of McKeesport, the Doug- 
lass Business College and the Scranton Correspondence School, this course 
of study thoroughly qualifying him for an active business career. He then 
entered the employ of the National Tube Company, in due course of time be- 
coming a skilled workman, and hence his services were of great value to his 
employers, who duly appreciated his efforts. In addition to his residence, 
located at No. 603 South Soles street, McKeesport, he is the owner of several 
dwelling houses in the seventh ward of that city, also considerable property in 
the ninth ward of the same city, from which he derives a goodly income. In 
addition to his regular employment, for a number of years he has given 



770 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

instruction on the guitar and banjo, being a skilled performer on both in- 
struments. He is a member of the Baptist Church of McKeesport, and since 
1895 a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is actively interested in all 
projects for the betterment of his adopted city, contributing liberally of his 
time and substance. Mr. Harding is unmarried. 



Among the residents of McKeesport who are of foreign birth, 

PRICE but who have added to the general welfare and prosperity of 

that section of the Keystone State, must be mentioned Mark 

Price, a man well known for his many sterling characteristics, whose word 

is as good as his bond. 

William Price, father of Mark Price, was a native of England, where 
he was reared, educated and spent almost his entire lifetime, emigrating to 
the United States at the age of seventy-two years, locating at McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, where his death occurred in the year 1888, aged eighty-six 
years. His wife, Mary Price, was also a native of England, and her death 
occurred there. They were the parents of nine children : Mary, deceased ; 
Frederick, deceased; Martha, deceased; Mark, of whom further; Norma, 
deceased; Ellen, deceased; Theophilus, deceased; William; Ruth. 

Mark Price was born in England, February 25, 1837. He obtained a 
common school education in the vicinity of his home, and remained in his 
native land until the year 1863, when he emigrated to the New World, locat- 
ing in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade, that of 
refiner. Later he removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was there em- 
ployed with the Schellenbergers Mill and the Brownston Mill, also with the 
American Iron Works for a period of fourteen years. In 1882 he took up 
his residence in McKeesport, and subsequently became the owner of the 
property located at No. 1231 Walnut street, where he now resides. In 
addition to this he is the owner of six houses, from which he derives a 
goodly income, and a vacant lot, which is increasing in value steadily, all in 
McKeesport. The success he has achieved has been the direct result of 
industry, perseverance and thrift, characteristics which always make for a 
successful career. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and a Re- 
publican in politics. 

Mr. Price married, February 21, 1884, Jane Annesley, born in Ireland, 
December, 1846, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Meats) Annesley, who 
resided in county Wicklow, Ireland, where they spent their entire lives, 
they being the parents of two other children, Henry and Mary Ann. Mr. 
and Mrs. Price are the parents of one son, Harry Annesley, born August 
9, 1888; educated in public and high schools, and Greensboro College, which 
he attended four years; is now clerk with the National Tube Company, 
having been in their employ for the past nine years; is a member of the 
Knights of Malta, Order of Moose, Patriotic Order Sons of America, and 
the Order of Foresters, of which he is secretary ; he is a member of the 
Episcopal Church, and a Republican in politics. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 771 

Among the highly successful and prominent business men of 

KOHARY McKeesport, noted for their progressive methods, energy and 

enterprise, must be mentioned Andrew Kohary, a man of 

foreign birth, who has made his way to success solely through his own efforts, 

having neither capital nor influential friends when he began his business 

career. 

Mathias Kohary, father of Andrew Kohary, was a native of Austria- 
Hungary, in which country he spent his entire lifetime, his death occurring 
there February 12, 1870. His widow, Judith Kohary, also a native of 
Austria-Hungary, and her two children, Sophia and Andrew, remained in 
their native land for a number of years after the death of the husband and 
father, but finally determined to emigrate to the United States, and accord- 
ingly, June 2, 1884, they landed in New York City, from whence they pro- 
ceeded to West Newton, Pennsylvania, where they remained about one year, 
then took up their residence in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and there the 
mother passed away at the age of sixty-nine years. 

Andrew Kohary was born in Austria-Hungary, October 19, 1865. He 
attended the public schools in the vicinity of his home, and later secured 
employment in the coal mines and the tube works, and after coming to this 
country was employed along the same lines for a number of years, giving 
entire satisfaction in the performance of his labors. In 1896 he established 
a grocery business at No. 1046 Walnut street, McKeesport, later becoming 
the owner of the property, and he also owns considerable property in Christy 
Park, eleventh ward, McKeesport. The success he has achieved is all the 
more remarkable when we take into consideration that when he landed in 
West Newton, Pennsylvania, with his mother and sister, he had thirteen 
cents in his possession. To men of this class, more than to others more 
fortunate, should credit be due, as we know that success means to them 
years of laborious toil and anxious thought. His trade is constantly increas- 
ing, owing to the fact that he carries a full line of the best goods, and that he 
is straightforward and honorable in all his dealings. 

Mr. Kohary married, in McKeesport, August 8, 1890, Marie Smith, a 
native of Germany, born April 14; 1867, daughter of Frederick and Cath- 
erine Elizabeth (Knoll) Smith, natives of Germany, in which country they 
lived and died. Mr. and Mrs. Kohary are the parents of five children: 
Christopher, born February 16, 1892; Edna, June 11, 1893; Marie, October 
21, 1895; Alice, November i, 1899; Charles, October 5, 1901. Mr. Kohary 
devotes his leisure time to his family, of whom he is justly proud, ever look- 
ing after their comfort and pleasure. 



The Nevin family, of which James M. Nevin, lawyer of Pitts- 
NEVIN burgh and president of the State Bank of Elizabeth, Pennsyl- 
vania, is a distinguished twentieth century representative, traces 
to the fifteenth century in England. 

(I) From Scotland a branch of the family passed into county Antrim. 
Ireland, from whence John Nevin, the American ancestor, came in August, 



7^2 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1788, landing in Philadelphia. He was born in county Antrim, May i, 
1740, and came to Pennsylvania with his wife and several children. He made 
his home in Chester county, Pennsylvania, for two years, then with his 
entire family crossed the mountains, settling near Mingo Meeting House, 
in Washington county. There he leased a farm for the term of five years, 
agreeing in return for the use of tlie land to make certain improvements. 
When the lease had about half expired, he sold out to a party, receiving 
enough cash to purchase a farm in the same district, but over the line in 
Allegheny county. This farm, bought from James Hamilton, is located in 
what is now Jefferson township, Allegheny county. He improved his pur- 
chase by the erection of new buildings and lived in prosperity until his death 
in 1814. Both he and his wife were members of the Mifflin congregation 
of the Associated Reformed Church, and are buried in the graveyard con- 
nected with that church. His wife. Jennet (Brown) Nevin, born 1739, 
died in 181 1. Children: i. James, died in infancy. 2. John, a farmer, 
moved from Washington county to Beaver county, in 1832, and there died 
in 1845. 3. William, a farmer, moved early in life to Southern Ohio and 
there died. 4. Hugh, also removed to Southern Ohio. 5. Samuel, a farmer, 
moved to the state of Indiana, near Tippecanoe, and there died. 6. Robert, 
a farmer, died in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. 7. James, of whom further. 
8. Jeanette, married, and died near Columbus, Ohio. 

(II) James Nevin, youngest son of John Nevin, was born at Giant's 
Causeway, county Antrim, Ireland, September 20, 1782, and in 1788 was 
brought to Pennsylvania by his parents. He shared the family fortunes in 
Chester, Washington and Allegheny counties, Pennsylvania, remaining in the 
latter county until 1832, then removing to Negley, Columbiana county, Ohio, 
with his wife and children. There he bought a tract of about two hundred 
acres of forest land, which he cleared and so improved that it returned him 
a comfortable living. Coal underlay the whole farm and this he sold to the 
Carbon Hill Coal Company, of East Palestine, Ohio, and spent his last 
years with his son John, and here James Nevin died, May 19, 1874, buried 
in East Palestine, Ohio. He was a Democrat in politics, but so opposed to 
slavery that he left his party, joined with the Abolitionists and when the 
Republican party came into being, aiSliated with that organization, which 
seemed to be more in accord with his anti-slavery views. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Presbyterian Church. He married, June 24, 1823, 
Hannah Scott, born September 19, 1800, died April 13, 1878, at Enon 
Valley, Pennsylvania, buried in East Palestine, Ohio. She was a daughter 
of Abraham and Sarah (Hamilton) Scott, of Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, the latter daughter of James Hamilton, who early came from Mary- 
land, taking up large tracts of land in what is now Mifflin and Jefferson 
townships, Allegheny county. Children of James and Hannah Nevin: i. 
Abraham Scott, of further mention. 2. Jane, married Jonathan Hasson, 
and died in Columbiana, Ohio. 3. John, a retired merchant and farmer, 
now living in Lisbon, Ohio, a very old man. 4. Sarah, married Taggart 
Chamberlin, and died in East Palestine, Ohio. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 'j-ji 

(III) Abraham Scott Nevin, eldest child of James and Hannah (Scott) 
Nevin, was born on the Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, farm, owned by his 
parents, in 1824, died in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, in 1879. He was 
educated in the public schools, and like his forbears spent his life engaged 
in farming. He worked on the home farm until having assumed the responsi- 
bilities of a husband and father, he founded a home of his own, purchasing 
a farm adjoining the homestead. This he cultivated until the discovery that 
coal underlaid it, then sold to good advantage and purchased another Ohio 
farm. There he remained the greater portion of his after life, but died in 
Lawrence county, Pennsylvania. He was a man of strong character, and 
in the communities in which he resided always held a leading position. He 
was an officer of the Ohio state militia, was a justice of the peace, and 
served many years as school director. He was a Whig and a Republican, 
belonged to the United Presbyterian Church and was active in church work. 
He married Mary Jane, daughter of Robert and Sarah (Richardson) Camp- 
bell, who survives him, aged eighty-six years, a resident of Ben Avon, a 
suburb of Pittsburgh, making her home with her daughter, Mrs. John H. 
Watt. Children: i. James Melancthon, of further mention. 2. Robert E., 
died in 191 1 at Ashley, Indiana. 3. Margaret, died in youthful womanhood, 
unmarried. 4. Laura, married John H. Watt, and resides at Ben Avon, 
Pennsylvania. 5. William S., a minister of the Presbyterian Church, now 
located in Philadelphia. 6. John C, killed in railway accident in Colorado. 
7. Joseph C, cashier of the Avalon Bank (Pittsburgh), but resides in Ems- 
worth, Pennsylvania. 8. Hugh, cashier of the First National Bank of Home- 
stead and treasurer of the Monongahela Trust Company of the same city. 

(IV) James Melancthon Nevin, eldest son of Abraham Scott and Mary 
Jane (Campbell) Nevin, was born at East Palestine, Ohio, June 19, 1849. 
He prepared in the public schools, entered Monmouth College, Illinois, and 
there was graduated, Bachelor of Science, class of 1879. Four years later 
Monmouth conferred the degree of Master of Arts. He then entered the 
law school of the University of Iowa, at Iowa City, and in 1881 was grad- 
uated Bachelor of Laws. He then pursued post-graduate study at tlie 
University of St. Louis and in 1882 was awarded the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws by the law school of that university. In 1882 he located in Pittsburgh, 
and after admission to the Allegheny bar began practice in that city. This 
was thirty-two years ago and he has since been in continuous practice in 
Pittsburgh, where he ranks high in his profession. He has been admitted 
to all state and federal courts of the district and has a large business in 
all. His practice is general in character. Orphans' Court business, however, 
being his favored line of professional work. He is learned in the law, 
skillful in its application and strenuously opposed to all tricks or subterfuge 
that might gain him an advantage. He is a close student and all through 
his professional career has carefully safeguarded the interests committed 
to him by confiding clients. He is highly regarded by his brethren of the 
profession and recognized by them as a man of ability and one guided 
by the highest principles of professional honor. During these thirty-two 



774 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

years Mr. Nevin has resided in the Httle borough of Ehzabeth, making the 
journey daily to his offices in the Bakewell Building in Pittsburgh. 

While the law has ever been to him a jealous mistress, he has other 
important interests. He was one of the organizers of the State Bank of 
Elizabeth, was elected its first president on incorporation in 1900 and has 
ever since been the honored head of that most prosperous financial institution 
that furnishes banking facilities to a large section of southeastern Allegheny 
county. For many years he has been a trustee of the United Presbyterian 
Church, is a member of the American, Pennsylvania State and Allegheny 
County Bar associations, is a member of the American Geographical Society, 
belongs to several clubs, and in politics is a Prohibitionist. 

Mr. Nevin married, in 1884, Emma Lucille, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth Gordon, of Monmouth, Illinois. Children: i. James Gordon, 
graduate of Westminster College, class of 1905, graduate of the Law 
School of the University of Pittsburgh, class of 1908, member of the Alle- 
gheny county bar, admitted to all courts and now engaged in legal practice 
with his honored father. 2. Lucille, graduate of Westminster College, 
class of 1906, teacher in Beaver, Pennsylvania, High School. 3. Norma 
M., graduate of Westminster College, class of 1909, now a teacher in 
Beaver High School. 4. Lois, graduate of Westminster College, class of 
1913. 5. D. McDill, entered Westminster College, but before completing 
his course entered the agricultural department of State College, where he 
is now a student. 6. Sybil, student in Elizabeth High School. 7. Millicent, 
a student in Elizabeth Grammar School. 



Hugh Henry Brackenridge, jurist, was born near 
BRACKENRIDGE Campbellton, Scotland, in 1748, the son of a poor 

farmer, who emigrated to America in 1753. He 
earned his way through college, and was graduated from Princeton in 1771. 
After teaching five years, he entered the field of journalism, and for some 
time was editor of The United States Magazine, of Philadelphia. He 
studied theology, and during the Revolutionary War acted as chaplain in the 
army. After being admitted to the bar in 1781, he opened a law office at 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He was interested and active in the political 
controversies of the time, and during the famous "Whiskey Insurrection" 
of 1794 was a strong advocate of a peaceable adjustment of the difficulty. 
In 1799 he was made judge of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. "The 
Rising Glory of America," which he wrote in conjunction with Philip 
Freneau, while at college, was published in 1772; "Bunker Hill," a drama, 
in 1776; "Incidents of the Insurrection in Western Pennsylvania," in 1795; 
"Eulogium of the Brave who fell in the Contest with Great Britain," in 
1778; "Modern Chivalry, or the Adventures of Captain Farrago and 
Teague O'Reagan, his Servant," in 1796; "Gazette Publications Collected," 
in 1806; and "Law Miscellanies," in 1814. He died in Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania. June 25, 1816. 

Henry Marie Brackenridge, son of Hugh Henry Brackenridge, was 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 775 

born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 11, 1786. His father very early 
discovered in him traces of a superior intellect, and determined to cultivate 
this to the utmost. His early education was acquired altogether under 
private tuition, a part of this being imparted by his father personally, in 
whose study a small table was placed for the exclusive use of his son. At 
the age of seven years he was sent to a French school at St. Genevieve, 
in Upper Louisiana, in order to obtain a complete mastery of the French 
language. This experiment was attended with the most complete success. 
He was about fifteen years of age when his father was appointed to the 
supreme bench of Pennsylvania, and he was then placed in the office of the 
prothonotary or clerk of the court, to prepare him for taking up the study 
of law. He remained there two years, then entered the office of a prac- 
ticing attorney, and read law to such good efifect that he was admitted to 
the bar at the age of twenty years. Returning to his father's home in 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, he spent more than a year, by the advice of his 
father, in the special study of the law of equity and maritime law, and 
qualified himself for practice along those lines, intending to open an office 
in the city of Baltimore, with its magnificent harbor facilities. L^pon going 
to that city, he entered the office of a practitioner in chancery, and also 
attended general court sessions, where he had the opportunity of listening 
to some of the foremost lawyers of the day. He found, however, that the 
large number of lawyers in the city was altogether out of proportion to the 
size of its population, and decided that he would have a better opportunity 
of making his way in a smaller town. Having heard that there was but one 
lawyer in the town of Somerset, Pennsylvania, he went to that town, and 
took possession of the office which had but recently become vacant, owing 
to the death of his predecessor. Here he acquired a lucrative practice. 
In 1810 Mr. Brackenridge took his departure for Upper Louisiana, and 
upon his arrival there was most heartily received by the family with whem 
he had lived while at school at St. Genevieve. It happened to be court 
week, and he was engaged in several important cases. He then went to 
St. Louis, Missouri, and while there proceeded with the compilation of the 
data for his interesting w^ork on Louisiana, which was published in Pitts- 
burgh, in 1812. In the year 181 1 he was appointed deputy attorney general 
for the territory of New Orleans, afterwards the state of Louisiana. Later, 
although only twenty-three years of age, he was appointed district attorney. 
He was an intimate friend of Presidents Madison and Monroe, and took 
an active part in favor of the United States acknowledging the independence 
of the South American colonies. He wrote a. paper in the form of a letter 
addressed to "An American," sent this to President Monroe, and it was 
republished in England in the Pamphleteer^ and translated mto the French 
and Spanish languages. In 1821 he was appointed United States judge 
for the Western District of Florida, and filled this responsible office for a 
period of more than ten years. 

Mr. Brackenridge married Caroline Marie, of Philadelphia, owner of a 
valuable tract of land along the Pennsylvania canal, and they moved to 



776 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

that section. From twenty to twenty-two hundred acres of land were in 
this parcel, and Mr. Brackenridge later founded the town of Tarentum, 
between which and Natrona is still situated the beautiful country residence 
of the family. On this same tract has grown up another town, Bracken- 
ridge, just above Tarentum. In 1840 Mr. Brackenridge was elected to the 
United States congress, and the following year was appointed commissioner 
under the Mexican treaty, in conjunction with Governor Marcy, of New 
York. With the exception of a term in the Pennsylvania legislature in 
1844, he lived retired until his death, January 18, 1871. Much of the 
property is still held as the Brackenridge Estate. 

Henry M. Brackenridge left one son, Benjamin Morgan Brackenridge, 
who was never actively engaged in business, he having died at the age of 
thirty-five years. He married Phillipine Stieren, and left one son, Henry 
M. Brackenridge, who developed the property of the Brackenridge Estate, 
organizing and building various manufacturing interests in glass, iron and 
steel. The borough of Brackenridge, mentioned above, was named in his 
honor. 



Peter Gloeckner was born in Prussia, in 1833, and after 
GLOECKNER his father's death his mother brought him to the United 

States with her two other children, Mary and Andrew. 
The family settled in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where Peter began working on a farm. Later he bought a farm of seventy- 
two acres in McCandless on which he resided until his deatli, September 
16, 1866. He married Mary Cole, born July 4, 1834, died August 9, 1914, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Cole. Several years after the death of 
Peter Gloeckner his widow married Frank Goss and had a son Frank, born 
in 1881. Children of Peter and Mary (Cole) Gloeckner: i. Peter John, 
of further mention. 2. Clara, born July 8, 1863, married Henry Enders. 
3. Mary, born September 6, 1866, married Peter Statelmyer, died October 
18, 1914. The family were members of the Roman Catholic Church. 

Peter John Gloeckner, only son of Peter and Mary (Cole) Gloeckner, 
was born in McCandless township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 6, 1861. He attended the public schools, and from youth has been 
engaged in farming. In 1898 he became owner of the home farm in Mc- 
Candless township and there resides, engaged in general farming. He is a 
member of the Roman Catholic Church and a Democrat in politics, serving 
on the election board. He married Margaret, daughter of John and Ger- 
trude Strickler. Children: i. Mary, born October 26, 1884, died in Sep- 
tember, 1885. 2. Gertrude, born October 25, 1886, married Frank W. 
Beiring, and has children, Edward, Raymond, Frank. 3. Clara, born Sep- 
tember I, 1888, deceased. 4. Hilda, born in 1890. 5. Margaret, born in 
January, 1892. 6. Eva, "born October 26, 1894. 7. Mary, born in 1896. 
8. Henry, born September 14, 1900. 9. John, born October 26, 1902. 10. 
Peter, born January 13, 1904, deceased. 11. Joseph, born December 26, 1907. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 777 

German records are those which must be perused for an ac- 
WETZEL count of the early generation of the family of Wetzel, this 

American line having been founded by Levi Wetzel, a native 
of Germany. He was reared and educated in the land of his birth, there 
serving an apprenticeship in the trade of stone mason, emigrating to the 
United States when a young man and settling in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He 
obtained employment at his trade, and there remained until about 1854, when 
he located in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, becoming the 
owner of land near the present town of Glenshaw. On this property he con- 
ducted general farming and market gardening, adding to his possessions until, 
at his death, aged sixty-nine years, he held title to ninety-four acres of land in 
the township, divided into four tracts. His success in his agricultural 
operations was the fruit of industry and intelligent application of the 
lessons learned by experience, sometimes in disaster, oftener in fortune. 
He avoided none of the responsibilities of good citizenship, and through a 
life well ordered and usefully spent held the liking and regard of his 
neighbors. The property of which he was the owner was principally 
timber land when it came into his possession, and the task that he 
successfully completed in putting the greater part of it under cultivation 
was no easy one. He and his family were communicants of St. Mary's 
Roman Catholic Church, of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Wetzel mar- 
ried Margaretta Milburt, born in Germany, her parents coming to the 
United States from the homeland. Children: i. Margaret, deceased. 2. 
Carolina, deceased. 3. Mary, married a Mr. Kestler, and resides in Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania. 4. Lena, married a Mr. Chisler, and lives in 
Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 5. Michael, deceased. 
6. Levi, of whom further. 7. Adam, deceased. 8. George, deceased. 

Levi (2) Wetzel, son of Levi (i) and Margaretta (Milburt) Wetzel, 
was born in Shaler township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Januar}' 6, 
1861, and was there a student in the public schools. In boyhood and young 
manhood he was his father's assistant on the home farm, in 1887 beginning 
independent operations on one of his father's farms, at Glenshaw, Penn- 
sylvania. In the following year he erected a comfortable dwelling, of ex- 
cellent appearance, and has there since lived, his farm fifty acres in extent. 
He engages principally in gardening for the nearby market, and in that line 
has prospered. Mr. Wetzel and his family are members of the All Saints 
Roman Catholic Church, of Etna, Pennsylvania. Mr. Wetzel married, 
November 24, 1885, Anna Mary Nestler, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and 
has children: Edward Jacob, married Helen Magdalene Kruwel, and has 
one child, Isabell Anna ; Clara Maria ; Leonard Mickel ; Catherine Anna, 
married George William Emig, who died October 31, 1903, and they had 
one child, George Anthony; Matilda Mary, died November 28, 1904: Mar- 
cella Elizabeth; Raymond Anthony, died May 14, 1900; Sylvester Francis 
De Sales ; George Adam. 



778 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The Lee family is one which has gained renown in many Hnes in 
LEE this country, and has been no less honored in England. The 

branch under discussion here has been in this country for thirty- 
three years, and during that time the various members of the family have 
proven their worth as reliable citizens. 

(I) William Lee, who was born in England and spent his entire life 
there, was a wheelwright by occupation, and lived on the homestead which 
has been in the possession of the family for more than three centuries. He 

married Anna , and among their children was William, of whom 

further. 

(II) William (2) Lee, son of William (i) and Anna Lee, was born 
at Kirkbye, Ashfield, England. He was a wheelwright and carriage builder, 
occupations he followed throughout the active years of his life in his native 
land. He married Dorothy Wass, born at Newsteade Castle, England, 
and among their children was James, of whom further. 

(III) James Lee, son of William (2) and Dorothy (Wass) Lee, was 
born at Kirkbye, Ashfield, England, November 19, 1853. He acquired his 
education in his native land, after which he engaged in gardening on a large 
estate. In 1881 he emigrated to the United States, where he made his home 
at Mount Lebanon, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, for about fifteen 
months, then removed to Bellevue, in the same county, where he has since 
resided. For a number of years he was successfully engaged in landscape 
gardening, thus providing a comfortable home for his family, but since 1895, 
a period of nineteen years, has served in the capacity of street commissioner 
of the borough of Bellevue, having been first elected in that year on the 
Republican ticket, and re-elected each year since that time, this fact testify- 
ing eloquently to his ability, efficiency and popularity. When he assumed 
control of the office there were no paved streets and no sewer system in the 
borough, and at the present time (1914) seventy-five of the streets are well 
paved, brick and concrete being the materials used, totaling a large number 
of miles. This has added greatly to the attractiveness and beauty of the 
locality and in this way the population has been increased to a large extent. 
Mr. Lee is an active factor in all enterprises that have for their object the 
welfare of the community, and is held in high esteem by all with whom he 
is brought in contact. During his residence in England he was a member 
of the Episcopal Church, also a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Lee married, in England, August 22, 1878, Pattie Bax, born in 
Minster, Kent, not far from Dover, England, daughter of Thomas and 
Bessie (Cassell) Bax, who resided in the same house seventy years, this 
being located on a farm which Mr. Bax cultivated. Mrs. Lee is a member 
of the Methodist Protestant Church, in the work of which she takes, an 
active interest, giving liberally of her time and means, and she does not con- 
fine her attention to church matters only, being equally interested in all 
movements for the general good, serving as a member of the advisory board 




/j^kuu^^^^^ oCe^e^ 




KJlicnarf/ Woor/iora 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 779 

of the Bellevuc Suburban Hospital, a most worthy institution. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee are well known in the community wherein they reside, their home 
being noted for the hospitality dispensed there. 



Land in what is now the vicinity of the borough of 
WOODFORD Carrick, Pennsylvania, was owned at an early day by 

William Woodford, American ancestor of the line herein 
recorded. He was a native of England, a member of a peasant family, and 
was placed at a useful and income-producing occupation as soon as he was 
physically able to become a breadwinner. Thus early deprived of educa- 
tional advantages, he was far beyond manhood's mark before he attained 
reading and writing knowledge, but his handicap acted rather as a spur than 
as a discouragement and he became a man of average information, and on 
topics that held for him especial interest was exceptionally accurately in- 
formed. He emigrated to the United States in 1822, and so slender were 
his resources that his belongings were tied up in a cotton handerchief. He 
settled in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and applied 
himself with relentless determination to the task of acquiring a home and 
possessions, finally becoming owner of one hundred and fourteen acres of 
land in Baldwin township, his death occurring where the borough of Carrick 
is now located. Mr. Woodford was one of the founders of the Concord 
Presbyterian Church, and throughout his life was a member thereof, attend- 
ing its services with punctual regularity and devoting himself with whole- 
souled enthusiasm to its work. While working in a quarry procuring stone 
for the foundation of the parsonage a splinter of stone struck his eyeball, 
destroying his sight in that member. His earnest regard for the welfare 
and maintenance of this place of worship descended to his only son and 
child, who for years bore almost the entire expense connected therewith. 
William Woodford died May 12, 1877, aged eighty-five years. He mar- 
ried Mrs. Jane (Hockenberry) Carr, a native of Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and had but one child who reached mature years, Richard, of whom 
further. 

(H) Richard Woodford, son of William and Jane (Hockenberry-Carr) 
Woodford, was born in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
July 20, 1835, died January 25, 1902. As a youth he attended the public 
schools of Point View, in his native township, and was for a time his father's 
helper on the home farm, later acquiring title to a tract of thirty acres in 
Baldwin township, land now occupied by the town of Carrick, lots in that 
place having been made from his land after his death. He and his wife 
were members of the Concord Presbyterian Church, to whose current ex- 
penses he was a most generous and liberal contributor. He was a Republi- 
can in political conviction, and a lifelong adherent to that party. During 
the greater part of his life his activities were hampered by a poor constitu- 
tion, his health weakening before the slightest strain, so that much that he 
was fitted for by nature, especially in regard to strength, was left undone. In 



/So WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

1885 he caused the erection of a house at No. 2033 Brownsville road, the 
present home of his widow. He married, December 10, 1858, Mary A. 
Burgess, born in Baldwin township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 22, 1836, daughter of George and Harriet (Ward) Burgess, her 
parents both natives of county Kent, England, where they grew to maturity 
and were married. He was a farmer in his native land, and after his 
emigration to the United States, in 1830, settled in Pittsburgh and became 
a gardener on the South Side, later purchasing a farm in Baldwin township, 
where he died. Children of George and Harriet (Ward) Burgess: i. 
George, a brick manufacturer, married Ann Harris, both deceased. 2. 
Phoebe, married Daniel Bennett, both deceased ; lived in Baldwin township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 3. Mary A., of previous mention, married 
Richard Woodford. Children of Richard and Mary A. (Burgess) Wood- 
ford: I. George B., of whom further. 2. Walter L., born March 23, 1868; 
assistant treasurer of the Sharon Savings and Trust Company; married 
Wilhelmina Hayes. 3. Harvey Edwin, born May 28, 1870; unmarried, 
lives with his mother. 4. Laura L., born January 26, 1873, died unmarried, 
September 17, 190T. 

(HI) George B. Woodford, eldest of the four children of Richard and 
Mary A. (Burgess) Woodford was born in Baldwin township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, September 23, 1865. When he was two and one-half 
years of age his parents moved to the present site of Carrick, where he was 
educated in the public schools. He being the eldest son, his father's poor 
health placed upon his shoulders at an early age the responsibility of farm 
management, beginning the assumption of these duties when a boy of twelve 
years. He lived on the home farm until his marriage, in 1904 purchasing 
twenty-five acres of the farm from his mother, and three years later becom- 
ing owner of the remaining ninety acres. This has been platted for building 
lots and is known as the Woodford Subdivision, Nos. 2, 3 and 4. Since 
1904 Mr. Woodford has devoted himself to the development of this locality, 
his real estate operations being confined to that tract. The location is a 
delightful one, Carrick a thriving and prosperous community, and he has 
been successful in his dealings, the sale price of his property marking a 
wonderful increase over its original value. Mr. Woodford's residence is at 
No. 2103 Brownsville road, where he built a brick house in October, 1902. 
Mr. and Mrs. Woodford are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. 
He married, in 1892, Anna Keasey Dane Boehm, a widow, born in Germany, 
and is the father of one child, Hazel A., who lives at home. 



William and John A. Braun are sons of Adam Braun, born 
BRAUN in Hersfeld, a town of Prussia, in Plesse-Nassau, on the river 

Fulda, August 2, 1817, died in Shaler township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1889. He came to the United States 
a young man, settled in Shaler township, where he established and main- 
tained a dairy until 1854, when he purchased a farm of one hundred acres 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 781 

upon which he resided until his death. He married (first; Susan Siebert, 
born in Germany in 1824, who bore him four children. They were both 
active members of the German Evangelical Church. He married (second) 
Susannah Weisman, born in Germany, November 30, 1822. Children of 
first wife: i. Mary, born December 23, 1846, now deceased; she married 
Henry Mangold and left children: William and Emma. 2. Emma, born 
April 29, 1850; married Isaac Hartung. 3. Henry, born July 29, 1850, now 
deceased; married Emma Keil. 4. Rebecca, born April 11, 1854, her mother 
dying soon after her birth. Children of second wife: 5. William, of further 
mention. 6. Matilda, born January, 1859 ; married John S. Weissert. 7. 
Margaret L., married George H. Pfischner, deceased. 8. Amelia, died De- 
cember 5, 1909; married Henry Seel, who died December 15, 1909. 9. John 
A., of further mention. 

William Braun, eldest son of Adam Braun and his second wife, Sus- 
annah (Weisman) Braun, was born at the home farm, in Shaler township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1857. He was educated in the 
township public schools and at Sharpsburg Academy, securing in these 
schools a good mental training. He was his father's assistant on the farm 
and in the management of the dairy until he obtained legal age, then became 
head of the business. He continued business at the home farm until 1885, 
then bought a farm of thirty-six acres, where he engaged in dairy farming 
until 1899, then sold his dairy herd and business. Since then he has con- 
fined himself to stock dealing and farming. He is also a good auctioneer 
and cries many sales in his neighborhood. His farm adjoins that of his 
brother, John A. Braun, and is a well kept fertile tract, well improved. Mr. 
Braun is a Republican in politics and has served his township as auditor, 
treasurer and commissioner, holding these various offices for many years. 
He is a member of the Lutheran Church of Shalersburg. 

Mr. Braun married, September 24, 1885, Malinda M. Boertzler, born 
September 16, 1858, died January 14, 1912. Their marriage was not blessed 
with children, and after the death of his youngest sister, Amelia, and her 
husband, Henry Seel, in 1909, they adopted the youngest son, Harry Braun 
Seel, the court legalizing the adoption and changing the name of the boy to 
Harry Seel Braun. 

John A. Braun, youngest child of Adam Braun and his second wife, 
Susannah (Weisman) Braun, was born on the Shaler township farm, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1865. He attended public school 
until fourteen years of age, then until he was twenty-two was his father's 
assistant in the latter's dairy business. John A. then started in the same 
business for himself and conducted it most successfully until 191 1 when he 
sold his entire interest in the dairy, but retains his farm in Shaler township 
and there resides. In 191 1 he was appointed assistant superintendent of 
Allegheny county roads and placed in charge of the north roads of the 
county. He is a justice of the peace for Shaler township and for twenty- 
seven years has served as school director. He belongs to the Masonic 



782 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, is an active member of the German Evangelical Church, and 
in politics is a Republican. He married, May 26, 1898, Louisa Michley, 
born October 23, 1866, daughter of Adam and Mary Metz Michley, of But- 
ler county, Pennsylvania. 



Gardening is a branch of farming the possibilities of which 
LAGEMAN have scarcely been realized in the United States, w^here the 

tendency in operations of that nature is toward magnitude 
of scale rather than intensity of production. 

Among the exponents of this calling in Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and among its most successful followers are William Joseph and 
August Gerhart Lageman. They are sons of Garrett Henry Lageman, a 
native of Holland, who came to the United States in 1848, settling in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where he was married. In that place he was a farmer 
and truck-raiser, the Highland High School's site having formerly been a 
part of his land, and about 1876 moved to Morningside Heights, there pur- 
chasing eighteen acres of land, improving the same with substantial build- 
ings and there residing until his death in 1902. During the war between the 
states he was three times drafted for service in the Union army, each time 
paying for the services of a substitute who was sent to the front. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Roman Catholic Church, while in political 
faith he was a Democrat, serving as a member of the borough council of 
Morningside Heights and becoming assessor of the eighteenth ward after 
the borough was incorporated with the city of Pittsburgh. He married 
Martha Brickwade, born in Holland, who came to the United States un- 
married, her death occurring in 1909. They were the parents of: i. Mary, 
died in infancy. 2. John, died in infancy. 3. Henry, died unmarried, aged 
twenty-eight years. 4. Herman, a poultry raiser, lives near Sharpsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 5. John J., died aged thirty-four years. 6. August Gerhart, 
of whom further. 7. William Joseph, of whom further. 

August Gerhart Lageman, son of Garrett Henry and Martha (Brick- 
wade) Lageman, was born in Pittsburgh East End, December 17, 1857. He 
was a student in St. Peter's and St. Paul's Parochial School, finishing his 
studies by a course in the commercial department of the Pittsburgh Central 
High School, whence he was graduated. His education completed he was for 
four years associated with his brother, Herman, in the grocery business, 
then for several years assisted his father at home. After his marriage in 
1881 he established in vegetable gardening in partnership with his brother- 
in-law, Frank Schuler, at Ingram Heights, an association that was severed 
after nine months, Mr. Lageman passing the next year with his father. He 
then moved to his present location on Ewing road, Crafton, and was for 
nine months engaged in gardening with his father-in-law, at the end of that 
time purchasing his interest in the business and continuing as the sole pro- 
prietor, later buying the land that he cultivated. The tract at the time of 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 783 

purchase consisted of twelve and one-half acres and since that time Mr, 
Lageman has added seven acres to his possessions, renting ten acres addi- 
tional. His son is connected with him in a general gardening business, and 
during the spring and summer season they are assisted by a force of three or 
four men. Prosperity has attended Mr. Lageman's efforts in large measure, 
and from land valuable in itself he derives crops that command attractive 
prices on the market because of their well-known freshness and excellence. 

He married, July 7, 1881, Barbara Catherine, born in Ingram, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, died November 15, 1901, daughter of Philip and Cath- 
arine Schuler, her father, deceased, a farmer and fruit-grower. Children 
of August Gerhart and Barbara Catherine (Schuler) Lageman: i. Clem- 
entina, died in infancy. 2. Harry, paying teller of the Diamond National 
Bank, of Pittsburgh, resides in Ingram, Pennsylvania. 3. Philip August, 
died in infancy. 4. John J., lives in Crafton, Pennsylvania, his father's 
business partner. 5. Barbara Catherine, married Bernard A. Bannon, and 
lives at home. 6. Mary Elizabeth, lives in Ingram, Pennsylvania. 7. Aloy- 
sius, died aged nine years. 8. Jerome, twin of Aloysius, died in infancy. 
9. August lives at home. 10. Angelina, lives at home. 

William Joseph Lageman, son of Garrett Henry and Martha f Brick- 
wade) Lageman, was born in Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
February 5, i860. He obtained his youthful education in St. Peter's and St. 
Paul's Parochial School, completing his studies by a business course in Duff's 
Commercial College. He was first a truck raiser in Pittsburgh East End, 
about 1893 moving to Chartiers township, now the third ward of Crafton, 
there purchasing twenty-five acres, of land, and continuing in general garden- 
ing operations at that place at this time (1914). Since his purchase the land 
that he cultivates with such marked success has increased greatly in value, 
and from its bountiful yield under skillful management he has realized a 
comfortable income. His market is a ready one, his reputation as a success- 
ful gardener having gained him a wide patronage, past experience having 
taught his trade the assurance of fresh and palatable products in season. 
An Independent in politics he has served as a member of the Crafton coun- 
cil for three years, and with his wife belongs to St. Philip's Roman Catholic 
Church, also holding membership in the Knights of Columbus and the Cath- 
olic Mutual Beneficial Association. 

Mr. Lageman married, September 18, 1884, Jerome Schnelbach, born 
in Pittsburgh East End. daughter of Henry and Margaret (Hyle) Schnel- 
bach, her father, an early settler in that locality, died in 1912, aged eighty- 
four years. Mr. and Mrs. Lageman are the parents of: i. Leona, married 
John Myers, and lives in Pittsburgh East End. 2. Marie, lives at home. 
3. John, lives at home. 4. Joseph, lives at home. 5. Maurice, a brass cutter, 
lives at home. 



784 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

August Kiehl is a member of a family representative of the 
KIEHL best type of German-American character, which has brought 

to the cosmopolitan citizenship of this country its own peculiar 
traits of steadfast effort, energy and thrift. 

His father's name was August Kiehl also, the elder man being born in 
the '"Fatherland," and coming to this country while still a youth. Upon ar- 
riving in the United States he went directly to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
and there took up his abode. He met in Pittsburgh, sometime after his 
arrival, Theresa Mesner, also a native of Germany, who had come as a 
young girl to the United States and settled in the Pennsylvanian city. To 
Miss Mesner Mr. Kiehl was married in Millvale, Pennsylvania, and by her 
had two sons, August, of whom further, and Charles. The death of Mr. 
Kiehl occurred August 27, 1914, and his wife's death occurred in 1883. 

August Kiehl Jr. was born August 4, 1880, in "South Side," Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. He there passed his childhood, receiving his education in the 
local public schools. At the age of thirteen years he left school and found 
employment for himself in various ways until he had reached the age of 
seventeen. He then learned the trade of plumber, and in 1899 removed to 
the town of Millvale, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in the plumbing 
business on his own account. In this enterprise he flourished so well that by 
1905 he owned his own place of business at No. 405 Grant street, Millvale. 
His success did not end there, but ever since his business has grown and 
flourished until it has reached its present proportions. Besides his activity in 
his business, Mr. Kiehl finds time to play a prominent part in the life of his 
town in a number of ways. He is a member of the Republican party and 
interested in all political questions, whether of local or general application, 
and he is a member of the Junior Order of American Mechanics, the Knights 
of the Maccabees, the Protective Home Circle and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. 

Mr. Kiehl married, March, 1901, Minnie Rahn, a native of Millvale, 
Pennsylvania, where she was born. Mrs. Kiehl is the daughter of John and 
Augusta Rahn, Mr. Rahn deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Kiehl have been born 

seven children, as follows : August, deceased ; Anna ; Ruth ; Hester ; B , 

deceased ; Levern ; Wilfred. 

In spite of his youth Mr. Kiehl has already made a prominent position 
for himself in the community of which he is a member. He is already a man 
of substance and has made his own way in the world, whatever measure of 
success is his being due to his own efforts. He places his faith in work, be- 
lieving that this alone can accomplish anything for a man. He was reared in 
the Lutheran Church, and is formally a member, but he is liberal in religious 
matters and his children attend the Methodist Episcopal Sunday school. 



The maternal progenitors of the late John Harrison, an 

HARRISON old and honored resident of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 

came to Pennsylvania from the state of Virginia. His 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 7^5 

great-grandfather, Colonel Lawrence Muse, was a veteran of the French 
and Indian wars, residing near Winchester, Virginia, where his son, Fauntley 
Muse, was born in 1755. After the death of Colonel Muse, his widow, 
Elizabeth Fauntleroy, remained single for some time, then married Colonel 
William Elrod, and with her husband and son Fauntley came to Pennsyl- 
vania. They located on a tract near the village of Boston, on the Youghio- 
gheny river, where Fauntley Muse grew to manhood. During the war of 
the Revolution he served on the frontier under seven different enlistments, 
his terms of service aggregating twenty months. He was engaged in many 
fights with Indians in Western Pennsylvania, and rendered important service 
in controlling the savage allies of the English. After the war he engaged in 
farming, owning two hundred acres, where Olympia Park, McKeesport, is 
now located. He married (first) Mary Jones, who died in 1814, leaving 
nine children. He married (second) Margaret (Merton) Patterson, widow 
of Nathan Patterson. He died in 1839, at the farm on the Youghiogheny, 
the old house in which he lived still standing. Children by first wife: Wil- 
liam, died young; Ann, married John Montgomery; Mary, married (first) 
Robert Henderson, (second) George Warren; Fauntley (2), born 1790, 
married (first) Catherine Graham, (second) a Miss Graham; Sarah, mar- 
ried Joseph Edmundson; John Jones, born 1796, married (first) Rebecca 
Edmundson, (second) Mrs. Ella Z. (Craig) Wilson; Elizabeth, born June 
29, 1798, married John Harrison, of further mention; James, married (first) 
Jane Waters, (second) Hannah Condit; Margaret, married Thomas Ed- 
mundson. 

The paternal progenitors of John Harrison were of Irish blood, the 
Muses of Welsh. He was a grandson of James Harrison, of an early Alle- 
gheny county family, who married Jennie Bell, who bore him three sons and 
three daughters : William Henry, married Betsey Grove, and is buried with 
her in Versailles Cemetery ; James, married Ann Lynch, and has descendants 
now living in McKeesport ; John, of whom further ; Belle, married a Dough- 
erty; Elizabeth, married a Brisbin ; Sarah, married a Ritchie. 

(II) John Harrison, son of James and Jennie (Bell) Harrison, was 
born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1796. He spent his early 
life on the home farm, but after his marriage moved to the Forks of 
Youghiogheny and Monongahela rivers, and later to McKeesport. There he 
bought a plot of several acres on the southeast edge of the village and for 
many years followed there his trade of blacksmith. He and his wife were 
pious, devoted Presbyterians, workers in both church and Sunday school. 
They are both buried in Versailles Cemetery. He married Elizabeth Muse, 
born June 29, 1798, daughter of Fauntley and Mary (Jones) Muse, of previ- 
ous mention. Children: i. James, born June 14, 1822, died in 1824. 2. 
Mary, born June 27, 1824; married James Wilson; died in Dravosburg, 
Pennsylvania. 3. William E., born June 22, 1826, died in McKeesport: 
was postmaster and merchant. 4. Ann M., born March 5. 1826; married 
Samuel Fields;- died in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 5. Walter B.. born Au- 



786 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

gust 2, 1830, died in McKeesport; was a riverman. 6. John, of whom fur- 
ther. 7. Martha S., born December 30, 1834, died July 23, 1886; married 
G. W. Gray. 8. Fauntley M., born February 22, 1837, died April 13, 1853. 
9. Sarah born July 19, 1839, died December 23, 1882 ; married Joseph 
Dougherty. 

(Ill) John (2) Harrison, son of John (i) and Elizabeth (Muse) 
Harrison, was born in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1832, lived 
his entire life in the same neighborhood, and died January 18, 1905. He 
was educated in public schools in McKeesport, and on arriving at suitable 
age became a stationary engineer, working in the saw mills and on the river 
boats. When the steel mills were started in McKeesport, he was one of the 
first engineers employed and for forty-three years was continuously so en- 
gaged. During the latter years of his life he was chief engineer and fore- 
man, and during the last year he lived was an honored pensioner of the 
company, having reached the age limit and holding an honorable record for 
efficiency and fidelity. His home on what is now Ninth avenue he built on a 
part of his father's original purchase, he having purchased a large part of 
the tract from his brothers and sisters. The house he built and in which he 
lived and died stands not many yards from the house in which he was bom 
and where his youth was spent. He was a Republican in politics, and a 
member of the Royal Arcanum. 

John (2) Harrison married, January 27, 1859, Mary Russell, born in 
Scotland, November 26, 1844, who yet survives him, a resident of McKees- 
port. She is a daughter of Alexander and Lillie (Dewar) Russell, who 
came to the United States in 1849, settling in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on the banks of the Monongahela river, where Alexander Russell, a 
miner, died about 1852. His widow married (second) Andrew Taylor, and 
moved to Versailles township, and later removed to McKeesport, Allegheny 
county, where she again became a widow. She died at McKeesport in 1896. 
Children by Alexander Russell: i. Mary, widow of John (2) Harrison. 
2. Ellen, died in infancy. 3. Ellen, died aged three years. 4. William A., 
now living retired in McKeesport. 5. Elizabeth, married David Sarver, 
and died in McKeesport. By her second husband, Andrew Taylor, she 
had two children, who died young: George J., now living in McKeesport, 
and Thomas, living retired in Pittsburgh. Children of John (2) and Mary 
(Russell) Harrison: i. Martha E., a teacher, living at home. 2. Lillie D., 
married Robert D. Wilson, and resides in the state of Washington. 3. 
Jennie B., residing at home. 4. Elizabeth Muse, married W. E. Newlin, and 
resides in McKeesport. 5. Dewees Wood, resides in McKeesport, an em- 
ployee of the Pennsylvania railroad. 6. John G., died aged three years. 
7. Mary Russell, married George L. Edmundson. and resides in McKees- 
port. 8. Walter B.. a steel mill worker of McKeesport. These children, 
by virtue of the patriotic service of their ancestor, Fauntley Muse, are eligible 
to all societies basing membership upon descent from Revolutionary an- 
cestors. 





^^0(AU^^!^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 787 

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Harrison has continued her resi- 
dence in McKeesport in the home erected by her husband. She was a child 
of five years when brought to this country by her parents, and has passed 
her life largely in McKeesport, where she became a bride fifty-five years ago, 
and lived a happy wife forty-six of those years. 

Frank Beran, a native of Bohemia, Austria, spent his entire life 
BERAN in his native country, where he was a soap maker. He mar- 
ried Josephine — — , and had children: Frank, of further 
mention ; Joseph ; Wenzel, who came to America ; Josephine ; Julie. 

(H) Frank (2) Beran, son of Frank (i) and Josephine Beran, was 
born in Bohemia, in 1822, died in 1891, in his native land. He was a baker 
by trade, following this calling for a period of twenty years, then became 
a teamster, hauling goods from one city to another. He married Josephine 
Funfar, who came to America with her children after the death of her 
husband, settled at North Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was a member of 
St. Vencesloas Church, and died in 1896. Children: Marie, married An- 
thony Krecek, lives in Pittsburgh ; Antonia, married Anthony Cecunda, and 
lives at North Side, Pittsburgh ; Anna, deceased, married John Lhota ; Frank, 
lives at North Side, Pittsburgh, married Katherine Lhota ; John, of further 
mention. 

(HI) John Beran, son of Frank (2) and Josephine (Funfar) Beran, 
was born in Bohemia, Austria, June 24, 1863. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native country, and emigrated to the United States in 
1881. For about one year he lived at North Side, Pittsburgh, then went to 
Chicago, Illinois, where he worked in a bakery for a period of five months. 
He then returned to Pittsburgh and found employment in a bakery there. 
About 1884 he established himself in the tanning business, which he carried 
on about three years, and then opened a bakery, at No. 405 Chestnut street. 
North Side. He has made a success of this enterprise, and has been identi- 
fied with it since that time. Because his health had become impaired. Mr. 
Beran purchased a farm of thirty-two acres in Shaler township, but con- 
tinues as the owner of his business places at Nos. 401, 403 and 405 Chestnut 
street, and No. 96 Main street. He now devotes the greater part of his 
time to his farming interests, of which he is making a decided success. He 
has set out one thousand fruit trees, three thousand berry bushes, and two 
thousand grapevines. Politically he is a Republican, but has never held 
public office here. He is a consistent member of the Catholic church, to 
which he is a generous contributor. His fraternal and social affiliations are 
with the following organizations : St. Vencesloas Lodge ; Bohemian Literary 
Society; Independent Order of Foresters; grand vice-president of the Bo- 
hemian Roman Catholic Institution of United Jesuits. 

Mr. Beran married, October 31. 1886. Barbara, born in December. 1866, 
a daughter of Joseph and Anna (Sveska) Stybr, and they have children, all 
living at home: Joseph, born November 5, 1887; Edward, born July 9. 1890; 



788 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

John, born July 4, 1892; Otto, born December 25, 1895 ; Marie, born August 
25 1897; Bessie, born on Easter Day, 1900; Adele, born September 25, 1902; 
Charles, born May 16, 1909. 



The name of Wilhelm is to be met with very frequently 

WILHELM in this country, and still more frequently in its Anglicized 

form of William or Williams. The branch of the Wilhelm 

family of which this review treats has now lived here for some generations, 

but the original form of the name has been retained. 

(I) Paul Wilhelm was born in Germany, and emigrated to this country 
in 1858, sending for his wife and children the following year. He settled 
at South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he labored as a miner for 
a number of years, and died at West Liberty, at the age of seventy-two years. 
He married, in Germany, Caroline Spangler, who died in 1898, at the age 
of eighty-eight years. They were the parents of children as follows: i. 
William, a coal miner residing at Oakdale, Pennsylvania ; married Bertha 
Ressing. 2. Christian, of further mention. 3. CaroHne (Lena), married 
Philip Hoffman, a blacksmith, and they are living at McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Louisa, married William Haas, now deceased, and lives in Brook- 
line, a part of Pittsburgh. 5. Frederick, deceased; was a coal miner; mar- 
ried Susan Pollott, who is now living at West Liberty. 6. Charles, a mining 
foreman ; married Catherine Koontz ; lives at Carrick, Pennsylvania. 

(H) Christian Wilhelm, son of Paul and Caroline (Spangler) Wilhelm, 
was born in Germany in 1836, died in Pennsylvania in 1908. He was born 
on a farm in Germany, and came to this country with his mother in 1859. 
He had received a good education in his native land, but being ignorant of 
the English language when he came to the United States he was obliged to 
go to work in the coal mines, of the South Side, Pittsburgh. This occupa- 
tion he continued some time after his marriage, but the constant underground 
employment undermined his health, and he was obliged to discontinue this 
form of labor. He accordingly opened a grocery store at Dravosburg, 
Pennsylvania, which he carried on successfully for a period of six years, 
then removed to West Liberty, in 1868, this section now being the nineteenth 
ward of Pittsburgh. There he purchased the store of Charles King, later 
erecting a store building of his own, and conducted a general store until his 
death. He was a man of considerable importance in the community, giving 
his support to the Republican party, and served as a member of the school 
board and the town council. He and his wife were members of the German 
Evangelical Church. Mr. Wilhelm married Louisa Coch, the only child of 
her parents. Her father died in Germany, where she was born in 1841, and 
her mother came to America with her, and settled at Becks Run, Allegheny 

county, Pennsylvania. There she married (second) Schneider, and 

died June 9, 1866, having had the following named children by her second 
marriage : Christian, Adam, Robert, Martha. Mrs. Wilhelm died in Au- 
gust, 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm had children: i. George Philip Fred- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 789 

erick, had a miners' supply store at Market street, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he died January 8, 1913; he married Clara McCuen. 2. 
Louisa, married George Huey, a machinist and real estate dealer, living on 
West Liberty avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 3. William Powell, who has 
charge of the store established by his father at West Liberty ; married Louisa 
Bissell. 4. August Christian, of further mention. 5. Minnie, married James 
Walker, a grocer and general contractor ; lives at Rennerdale, Pennsylvania. 
6. Charles, died at the age of fourteen years. 

(Ill) August Christian Wilhelm, son of Christian and Louisa (Coch) 
Wilhelm, was born in West Liberty borough ; now a part of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, December 30, 1870. He attended the public schools of his 
native township until he had attained the age of fourteen years, when he 
commenced to devote all of his time to assisting his father in the work con- 
nected with the store, having given a part of his time to this service since 
he was six years of age. In this manner he had learned the business practi- 
cally and in every detail, and in 1897 he and his brother, William Powell, 
purchased the business from their father and operated it together for a 
period of five and a half years. In the year 1902 Mr. Wilhelm located in 
Dormont, Pennsylvania, and built a store there at the corner of West Lib- 
erty and Tennessee avenues. This was opened on January 15, 1903, and 
he has since that time been engaged in its successful conduct. He has more 
than doubled his stock since he first started there, and his trade in the gen- 
eral grocery line is one of the finest in that section of the country. He is 
a staunch Republican in political opinion, and he and his wife are members 
of the Mount Lebanon First Presbyterian Church. His fraternal affilia- 
tions are as follows : Dallas Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; Zerubbabel 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Ascalon Commandery, No. 59, Knights 
Templar; Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine; Western Star Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Wilhelm married, October 20, 1898, Ida May, born on Squirrel 
Hill, a part of Pittsburgh, a daughter of Casper and Magdalena Plazelett. 
the former a gardener, and both now deceased. The only child of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilhelm is Ethel Lenorace, born March 4, 1900. 



» In its Irish home the members of the Moore family were of 

MOORE Presbyterian belief, continuing in that faith after the emigra- 
tion to America in 1794 of Samuel D. and Nancy IMoore, both 
born in county Armagh, Ireland. In i8d2 Samuel D. Moore and his family 
left the city of Philadelphia, where they had first landed and where they had 
made their home in the intervening years, moving to Allegheny county. 
Pennsylvania, there living in North Fayette township. Samuel D. and 
Nancy Moore were the parents of : Robert, Alexander, Samuel, Marv. John, 
of whom further ; Hugh. 

(II) John Moore, son of Samuel D. and Nancy Moore, was bom while 
his parents were journeying from Philadelphia to Allegheny county, Penn- 



790 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

sylvania, in January, 1802, died in North Fayette township, Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. He was reared on his father's farm, and after his mar- 
riage, in 1826, purchased a large tract of land in North Fayette township, 
where he passed the remainder of his life. Large flocks of sheep grazed 
over his acres, and the wool annually taken from these animals was woven 
on the farm, the cloth product bringing a profitable price on the market. 
His church was the United Presbyterian, at the services of which he was 
a regular attendant. He married, in 1826, Jane, born in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, in September, 1802, daughter of John and Margaret (Riddle) 
Arnold. Her parents were natives of the north of Ireland, coming to this 
country in 1787, settling on the property now known as the Vincent Miller 
farm in North Fayette township, where John Arnold held title. They were 
prominent in the organization of a congregation of the United Presbyterian 
faith in that locality, a brother of Margaret Riddle, Rev. John Riddle, being 
the first pastor to minister to the newly organized body, which first wor- 
shipped in a tent on Robinson Run, the tabernacle being known as Robinson 
Run Tent. John and Margaret (Riddle) Arnold were the parents of: i. John 
(2), married Mary Cabot, purchased a farm on King's creek, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, and there lived all of his life. 2. Margaret, married 
Samuel Steward, a blacksmith of Noblestown, Pennsylvania. 3. Jane, of 
previous mention, married John Moore. Children of John and Jane (Ar- 
nold) Moore: i. Samuel, died unmarried, aged twenty-one years. 2. Henry, 
a chairmaker, lived in Allegheny City (Pittsburgh North Side), Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Margaret, died unmarried, aged twenty years. 4. John A., of 
whom further. 5. Jane, married John P. Hughes, a wholesale and retail 
tobacconist of Pittsburgh. 6. Hugh, died in infancy. 

(Ill ) John A. Moore, son of John and Jane (Arnold) Moore, was born 
in North Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1833, died 
in 1908. He grew to manhood on the old Moore homestead, attending the 
Ewing school. He became the owner of that property in after life and spent 
his entire years thereon, cultivating the land with good success. His church 
was the United Presbyterian, while in politics he was an active worker for 
the Republican party. He married (first) Rebecca Anderson, born on the 
boundary line between Pennsylvania and West Virginia, died September 3, 
1861, daughter of Robert and Rebecca Anderson, her parents residents of 
Hancock county, West Virginia, her father a farmer. Robert and Rebecca 
Anderson had: i. Rebecca, of previous mention, married John A. Moore. 

2. Sarah, married William Shea, and moved to Fairview, West Virginia, 
there residing the remainder of her life. John A. Moore married (second) 
Catherine Peoples, born in North Fayette township, Allegheny count), 
Pennsylvania, died in September, 1879. Children of John A. and Rebecca 
(Anderson) Moore: i. Robert Anderson, of whom further. 2. John Sheri- 
dan, of whom further. Children of John A. and Catherine (Peoples) Moore: 

3. James, a carpenter of Oakdale, Pennsylvania. 4. Harry, a farmer, owns 
land near Hanlon Station, Pennsylvania. 5. Charles, a resident of the West. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 791 

6. Jennie, married James Cochran, and lives near Oakdale, I'cnnsylvania. 

7. Lizzie, married Martin Hughes, and lives near Erie, i'ennsylvania. 8. 
Nelson, a painter of Noblcstown, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Robert Anderson Moore, son of John A. and Rebecca (Ander- 
son) Moore, was born on the Steubenville Pike, North Fayette township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 27, 1859, and was there reared to 
manhood. Upon reaching mature age he engaged in farming operations 
independently, renting the land that he cultivated until 1910, in the fall of 
that year moving to Oakdale, where he has lived partially retired since that 
time. Mr. Moore's home is on Hastings avenue, and although he has con- 
tracted no pressing business alliances he has several connections that well 
occupy his time. His political party is the Republican, while both he and 
his wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church. He married, in 
November, 1888, Sarah J. Scott, and has one son, John Scott. John and 
Sarah Scott, parents of Mrs. Moore, came from Ireland to Pennsylvania, 
where he rented a farm. They are both deceased. Children: Maria, de- 
ceased; Sarah J., John, Annie, deceased. 

(IV) John Sheridan Moore, son of John A. and Rebecca (Anderson) 
Moore, was born in North Fayette township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 27, 1861. Until he was seventeen years of age he attended 
the McGill School, living on the home farm until he was eighteen years old. 
He then was employed in Pittsburgh in the retail and wholesale tobacco 
store of his uncle, John P. Hughes, for about four years, then moved to 
Oakdale and became a mercantile clerk, being employed by J. J. Adams, 
Henry Matthews, and the Pittsburgh Coal Company. In 1903 Mr. Moore 
became the proprietor of a stationery and news store, in 1905 purchasing 
the general hardware store of R. Wallace & Brother, which he has conducted 
since that time. He has enlarged the stock of the store, added several de- 
partments thereto that had previously been lacking, one of the most success- 
ful of his new departures being the installation of a department for agri- 
cultural implements, of which he carries a generous and inclusive line. His 
new policy has attracted a large volume of business, they being purchasers 
of reliable goods, and the patrons of the establishment receive the most 
courteous of treatment. The Presbyterian Church is that of which Mr. 
Moore is a member, his fraternal society being the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, while politically he is a Republican. Since 1885 his home 
has been on Hastings avenue, Oakdale, where he built a residence in that 
year. 

Mr. Moore married, October 9, 1883, Ida Dodds, born in Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania, daughter of Solomon and Susan Dodds, her father a 
carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are the parents of: i. Bertha, born in 
April, 1886; married Rev. A. S. Wilson, a minister of the Presbyterian 
Church, and resides in Calcutta, Ohio. 2. Susan, born in 1887; rnarried 
Walter D. McClelland, engaged in the insurance business in Wilkinsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where they reside. 3. Wesley, born December 5, 1890; asso- 



792 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

dated in business with his father. 4. Homer, born August 27, 1895; a 
student in a business college. 5. Margaret, born in 1899; attending school. 

The branch of the Breitenbaugh family treated of 
BREITENBAUGH in this review has been in this country but a com- 
paratively short period of time, yet the various 
members have already amply shown their worth as good and desirable 
citizens. 

Joseph Breitenbaugh was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1809. He emi- 
grated to America in 1830, when just twenty-one years of age, and made 
his home for a time at Hagerstown, Maryland. He came to Manchester 
borough in 1844. He remained there until May 2, 1866, when he removed 
to Ress township, now Reserve township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a shoemaker by trade, and had followed this calling in his native 
land, but after settling in Reserve township he took up gardening and be- 
came identified with that field of industry very successfully. He was a 
Democrat politically, and a communicant of the Catholic church. While 
living in Hagerstown, Maryland, he married Katherine Bean, and they had 
children: Mary Katherine, died at the age of nine years; Joseph, died in 
infancy; Frank, died February 6, 1903; John J., of further mention. 

John J. Breitenbaugh, son of Joseph and Katherine (Bean) Breiten- 
baugh, was born at Manchester, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 
2, 1857. His education was acquired in the public schools of that section, 
and at a suitable age he took up the florist's calling, and has made a decided 
success of this. He owns five acres of land, all under cultivation, lying on 
the borders of Millvale, and has several fine greenhouses, and a beautiful 
house on this property. He has been an active worker in the interests of 
the Democratic party, and served as township commissioner, 1908-10. His 
religious affiliation is with the Catholic church, to which he is a generous 
contributor. Mr. Breitenbaugh married, June 28, 1902, Mary Kress, and 
they have had children : Matilda, John William, Florence, Charles, James, 
Anthony, Edwin, all living at home. 

Herman Hudson Tully, prominently and actively identified 

TULLY with the varied interests of the city of McKeesport, where 

his birth occurred, is a representative of a family that has long 

been seated in the state of Maryland, the members thereof performing the 

duties falling to their lot in an exemplary manner. 

(I) George H. Tully, grandfather of Herman Hudson Tully, was born 
August 20, 1842, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his grandmother, Mar- 
garet Tully, was born September 30, 1842, in Cecil county, Elkton, Mary- 
land. Early in their married life they went to Washington and from there 
to McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where they spent the remainder of their days. 
(H) Garvin Tully, son of George H. Tully, was born in Elkton, Lisle 
county, Maryland, September 22, 1862. After completing his studies in the 




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Z,^»^^a*i'r-r-^it^ J^'^ ^'^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 793 

common schools of the neighborhood, he became a roller in the mills, con- 
tinuing in this employ for a number of years, after which he turned his 
attention to the real estate business, being successfully engaged in that line 
of work for sixteen years, and at the present time (1914) is serving in 
the capacity of salesman for his son, Herman H. TuUy. His political alle- 
giance is given to the Republican party, and he is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, his wife holding a membership with the same church. 
He married Anna Hudson, born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, April 15, 
1863. Children: Grace, wife of Hartvig Svenson, of Charleroi, Pennsyl- 
vania; Herman Hudson, of whom further; Hazel, wife of Harry Stephen, 
of McKeesport, Pennsylvania ; Margaret, a resident of McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania. 

(HI) Herman Hudson Tully, son of Garvin Tully, was born in Mc- 
Keesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 13, 1886. The public 
schools of his native city afforded him the means of obtaining an education, 
and after completing his studies he entered the employ of W. Dewees 
Wood's Mill, where he continued working for four years. His next em- 
ployer was J. W. Weldon, a grocer, with whom he remained for two years, 
and his next employer was W. J. Sharpies, with whom he remained for 
three years. The following year he was a student in Bucknell University, 
Louisburg, Pennsylvania, thus supplementing the knowledge obtained during 
his earlier years. During his summer vacation of 1907, he was then em- 
ployed by the National Tube Company ; he then secured employment with 
the Realty Company, but after a short period of time he became an em- 
ployee of W. J. German, but only remained with him for a short period of 
time, as on October i, 1908, he engaged in the real estate, insurance and 
renting business on his own account, and now has the most extensive business 
in that line in Allegheny county, his office located at No. 517 Walnut street, 
McKeesport, Pennsylvania, his patronage increasing steadily with each 
passing year. He is a Progressive Republican in politics, and holds member- 
ship in the Knights of Malta, Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias, Royal 
Arcanum, Junior Order of American Mechanics, Pittsburgh Real Estate 
Board, McKeesport Cyclers Association, and the Board of Fire Underwriters 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania . 

Mr. Tully married, June 16, 1909, Emma Reynolds, of McKeesport, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph and Ann (Briggs) Reynolds, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. One child, Frank Reynolds, born 
January 14, 191 1. Mr. Tully is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church. They are well known in the community, honored and respected by 
all with whom they are brought in contact. 



Edward Griesler, farmer of McCandless, Allegheny coun- 

GRIESLER ty, Pennsylvania, was born on the farm he now owns. 

and is a son of Michael Griesler, who came from Germany 

to the United States a young married man. He settled first on a small 



794 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



tract in McCandless township, but a few years later purchased a farm 
of fifty acres, which he cleared and on which he erected the buildings now 
used by his son, Edward. He was a member of the Roman Catholic Church, 
and in politics a Democrat. Mr. Griesler and his wife Mary, were mar- 
ried in Germany, coming soon afterward to the United States. Children: 
I. Michael, unmarried. 2. Mary, married Harvey Fitzpatrick. 3. Elizabeth, 
married John Albright. 4. Joseph, married Elizabeth Smith. 5. Edward, of 
whom further. 

Edward Griesler was born February 23, 1869. He was educated in the 
public schools of McCandless township, and from youth was his father's as- 
sistant on the home farm. In 1906 he became owner of the property and 
there engages in general farming and market gardening. He is an attendant 
of the Presbyterian church, his wife being a member of that denomination. 
Mr. Griesler married Clara Anderson, born August 18, 1877, daughter oi 
Robert C. Anderson, born January 9, 1837, died February 21, 1914, and his 
wife, Leah Ann (Hamilton) Anderson, who survives him. Mrs. Anderson 
was the only child born in the historic Block House in Pittsburgh during 
the early period ; her father was killed in the Mexican War and her mother 
was living in the Block House. Children of Robert Anderson: i. Jennie 
L., married Ellis D. Powers. 2. Martha R., married Lemuel Stewart. 3. 
Ella May. 4. Frank O., married Emma Emmett. 5. Robert George, un- 
married. 6. Harry E., married Elizabeth Graham. 7. Clara, married Ed- 
ward Griesler. 8. Anna Blanche, married Charles Tredway. Children of 
Edward and Clara (Anderson) Griesler: i. Ivan Alphonhus, born Febru- 
ary 22, 1902. 2. Roy Sylvester, born October 14, 1903. 3. Martha Russell, 
born January 26, 1905. 4. Mabel Virginia, born August i, 1907. 5. Clara 
May, born February 28, 1909. 

The Brandt family settled in Franklin township, Allegheny 
BRANDT county, Pennsylvania, in 1840, the first settlers being Henry 

Brandt and his five sons, who on coming from Germany 
first located near Pittsburgh. Philip Brandt, grandson of Henry (2) 
Brandt, moved to the farm his family now occupies, shortly after his mar- 
riage in 1862 and there spent nearly a half century of wedded life, creating a 
home and rearing a family. The Brandts possessed all the typical virtues of 
the German settler and by industry and thrift prospered from their earliest 
settlement. 

(I) Henry Brandt came from Germany about 1830 with his wife, Anna 
Catherine, and five sons. He settled in Allegheny county at Squirrel Hill 
(Pittsburgh) and there resided until 1840. In the latter year he moved with 
his sons to Franklin township, where he bought land and resided until death. 
He was an industrious, thrifty man and reared his family in accordance 
with the principles that make the German so desirable a citizen wherever 
he goes. Children : Henry, of further mention ; George, married Catherine 
Scheif ; John, died in youth ; Philip, married Rachel Smaltz ; Conrad, never 
married. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 795 

(II) Henry (2) Brandt, eldest son of Henry (1; and Anna Catherine 
Brandt, was born in Germany and there resided until about 1830, when he 
joined the family emigration to the United States, settling with them at 
Squirrel Hill, Allegheny county, now a part of the city of Pittsburgh. He 
was well educated in Germany, and shortly after arriving in the United 
States (after a voyage of eighty-one days) married Catherine Schremf, also 
born in Germany. He began work in the new home as quarryman for fifty 
cents a day, but soon abandoned the quarry for a small farm, where he rai.-,ed 
garden produce and ran a dairy, Pittsburgh offering a ready market for 
all he could produce and it is said he was the first man to place buttermilk 
on public sale in that city. He prospered in his undertakings and accumu- 
lated considerable property. Children: Susanna, married Conrad Becker; 
Philip, of further mention; Henry, married Mary King; George, married 
Margaret Cook; Nicholas, unmarried. 

(III) Philip Brandt, eldest son of Henry (2) and Catherine (Schremf) 
Brandt, was born in (now) Pittsburgh East End, April 19, 1835, and was 
educated in the public schools of East Liberty. He worked with his father 
until his marriage, then began farming on his own account in Franklin 
township, renting the farm he purchased later and on which he resided until 
his death, March 5, 1910, in honored old age. He was very industrious and 
caused the acres he owned to yield bountifully. He erected the buildings 
on his farm of ninety-five acres, planted orchards and created a pleasant 
home, where his widow now resides, the cultivation of the farm being now 
in the hands of her sons, who devote its acres to fruit and market gardening 
purposes as well as general crops. The farm is well kept and speaks loudly 
in praise of its thrifty owners. Philip Brandt was a member of the German 
Lutheran Church, and a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Brandt married, in April, 1862, Sophia Waldschmidt, born in Ger- 
many, June 23, 1839, daughter of John and Catherine (Damm) Wald- 
schmidt, whose children were: i. Christina, married Barnett Keller, de- 
ceased, the widow now residing with her sister at the farm. 2. Sophia, now 
widow of Philip Brandt. Children of Philip and Sophia Brandt: i. George, 
born January 22, 1863 ; unmarried, and residing at the home farm. 2. Cath- 
erine, born May i, 1864, deceased; married George Cupps, and had two 
daughters. Lulu, born January 15, 1890, Emma Brandt, November 25, 1891, 
adopted by grandparents. 3. Nicholas, born December 2, 1865. 4. Susanna, 
born October 15, 1867, unmarried. 5. Sophia, born December 9, 1868, un- 
married. 6. Margaret, born November 23, 1871, unmarried. 7. Edward 
Philip, born August 27, 1877. 



The history of the Sample family leads to early Colonial 
SAMPLE days in Pennsylvania and beyond that to the Emerald Isle 

from whence came John Sample, great-grandfather of Silas 
Sample, of Wildwood, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. John Sample came 
to Pennsylvania, a young man, settling in now Cumberland county, Penn- 



796 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

sylvania, married and reared a family, among whom was his son, James, of 
whom further. 

(II) James Sample, son of John Sample, died November 24, 1S30. 
He was a noted Indian fighter and Revolutionary soldier. He located in 
Ross township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1790, and there owned 
four hundred acres of land. He was a farmer and miller and was a man 
of prominence until his death at age of seventy-six years. His life was 
spent amid pioneer surroundings and was a constant conflict with the wild 
forces of nature and the still more to be dreaded foe, the savage red man. 
He fought these foes as well as the uniformed enemies of his county dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War and once had the sorrow of knowing wife and 
child were in the hands of the savage. But their lives were saved by a 
squaw, to whom Mrs. Sample had shown kindness in more peaceful days, 
and they safely reached home. James Sample was the second elected 
sheriff of Allegheny county, and until his death retained a strong influence 
in the county. He married Christianna Taggart, born May 12, 1755, died 
November 10, 1829. Children: Mary, born August 30, 1780; James (2), 
March 29, 1786; John, January 24, 1788; Thomas, January 7, 1791 ; Robert 
A., of further mention; Eliza, January 27, 1797; William, July 28, 1800. 

(III) Robert A. Sample, fourth son of James and Christianna (Taggart) 
Sample, was born in Ross township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 10, 1793. He became a large land owner at "Girty's Run," Allegheny 
county. He was a farmer, a man of strong character and influence. He 
married Mary Simpson, born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, October 19, 
1799. Qiildren: i. James, born April 10, 1820; married Jane Ross. 2. 
John, born February 16, 1822; married Isabel R. Smith. 3. David, born 
February 8, 1824, died young. 4. William, born August 31, 1825. 5. Eliza 
Hannah, born October 4, 1827; married William Hutchman. 6. Mary Jane, 
born April 3, 1830, died young. 7. Sarah, born August 20, 1832; married 
Robert Ferguson. 8. Robert, born July 14, 1835; married Harriet Meyer. 
9. Silas, of further mention. 

(IV) Silas Sample, youngest son and child of Robert A. and Mary 
(Simpson) Sample, was born January 5, 1839, on the farm he now owns 
and in the house he now occupies in Hampton township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. He attended public schools of the township, and early began 
working on the farm that now consists of one hundred acres of fertile land, 
where his life has been spent. On August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company 
D, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was honorably discharged August 20, 1864. He fought at 
Antietam and other battles of the Army of the Potomac, escaping unhurt 
until May 3, 1863, when at the battle of Frederick his right knee was 
pierced by a rifle ball. He remained in the hospital until the following June 
13, when he received a thirty-day furlough to come home, and at expira- 
tion reported to hospital in Pittsburgh, remained to January, 1864, returned 
to Washington, D. C, and served in Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 797 

Corps, and on August 20, 1864, was honorably discharged from the army. 
After his return he resumed farming and so continued until advancing 
years warned him that his days of active work had passed. He had been 
for many years an elder of Cross Roads Presbyterian Church, and is a 
member of Colonel Clark's Post, No. 162, Grand Army of Republic, of 
Allegheny. 

Silas Sample married Eliza Jane Stewart, born February 26, 1846, died 
in 1893, daughter of Andrew E. Stewart. Children: i. David A., born 
March 28, 1870. 2. Robert F., born August 25, 1871 ; married Gertrude 
Seibert. 3. Mary E., born April 10, 1874; married Abelard H. Logan; 
children: Luella Jane, Willard D. 4. Susanna S., born May 28, 1878; 
married John Forsythe ; children : Dorothy Jane, Eugene S., Margaret. 5. 
William G., born May 27, 1882 ; married Mary E. Viock. 6. Harriet G., born 
August 31, 1885; married Charles Hardt. 7. Charles L., born September 
20, 1887; residing at home and cultivating the homestead farm. 

The Walker family came to this country originally from 

WALKER England, and bearers of the name are now to be found in 

every state in the Union. The branch under discussion here 

were residents of Maryland in earlier days, in that portion just south of 

Chester county, Pennsylvania, and later migrated to the latter state. 

Nathaniel Foster Walker was born in Maryland, near Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, August 8, 1806, died March 6, 1885. He was very young 
when his parents died, and at an early age was bound out to learn the har- 
ness and saddlemaking trade. He was still very young when he came to 
Steubenville, Ohio, where he worked at his trade as a journeyman, and 
finally opened a shop of his own which he conducted very successfully. In 
1862 he removed with his family to Richmond, Ohio, where he followed 
his trade until his death. He was a Republican in politics, and a member 
of the United Presbyterian Church. Mr. Walker married, when he was 
over forty years of age, Mary (Van Gilder) Banghart, born in Eastern 
Pennsylvania, August 12, 1812, died November 5, 1895. They had children: 
Nathaniel Ross, a Presbyterian minister, living in Cincinnati, Ohio; James 
Francis, born in 1853, a retired druggist of McKeesport, married Ella 
Moore; William Edward, of further mention. Mrs. Walker had been pre- 
viously married to Henry Banghart, a blacksmith of Millersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, and they had children : Van Gilder, deceased ; Isaac and Henry, 
farmers in Nebraska; Jennie, married David Robb, and lives in Blooming- 
ton, Illinois. 

The Van Gilder family, of which Mrs. Walker is a member, came 
originally from Holland, more than two hundred years ago, and settled in 
New Jersey. Probably all now bearing the name in America have had a 
common origin. Michael Van Gilder, father of Mrs. Walker, was a tanner 
by trade, and owned a tannery in Eastern Pennsylvania. He died at the 
age of ninety-six years at Richmond, Ohio. He was a soldier during the 



798 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

War of 1812, and later received a pension for the services he rendered 
during that struggle. He was Presbyterian, and took an active part in all 
affairs connected with the church he attended. He married Catherine 

, who died at the age of fifty-six years, and they had children : 

Isaac, a farmer, lived on Island Creek, Jefferson county, Ohio, went to 
California during the "gold fever" of 1849 ^^id upon his return settled on 
a farm in Iowa ; Charlotte, married, and lived in Jefferson county, Ohio ; 
Mary, who married Mr. Walker, as above mentioned ; Jane, married William 
Young, a Presbyterian preacher, lived for a time in Ohio, then moved to 
Illinois, where both died. 

William Edward Walker, son of Nathaniel Foster and Mary (Van 
Gilder) (Banghart) Walker, was born in Steubenville, Jefferson county, 
Ohio, January 28, 1856. He was six years of age when the family removed 
to Richmond, Ohio, and there he attended the public schools and Richmond 
College. He next matriculated at the Long Island Hospital College, in 
Brooklyn, New York, from which he was graduated in the class of 1881, 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine being conferred upon him. One year 
was spent in practice in Richmond, Ohio, in association with Dr. J. C. M. 
Floyd, and the following year he located in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
where he gained a large and lucrative practice, in which he is engaged at 
the present time. In 1893 he erected a large house, containing well-equipped 
and commodious offices, at No. 214 Sixth avenue, and has resided there 
since that time. He has served as a member of the board of health of 
McKeesport, and also as school director. He and his wife are members of 
the Presbyterian Church, in which he is an elder. His fraternal association 
is with Youghiogheny Lodge, No. 583, Free and Accepted Masons ; McKees- 
port Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Tancred Commandery, No. 48, Knights 
Templar; charter member of the McKeesport Commandery, Knights Temp- 
lar; Syria Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Walker married, in May, 1882, Letitia A., born in Richmond, 
Ohio, a daughter of John and Ruth Watt, owners of a farm. Children: 
Lena Frances, born July 28, 1884, married D. P. McCune, a physician of 
McKeesport, and has one child, David Pollock ; Sadie Jane, born September 
20, 1887, married John Zenn, a bank clerk in McKeesport, and has chil- 
dren: Dorothy and Sarah Letitia; Foster Watt, born August 26, 1889, was 
graduated from the high school and Grove City College, and resides with 
parents; John Hobson, born September 17, 1893, died August 10, 1904. 



This is an ancient and honored family, who were 
PRZYBYLSKI gentlemen farmers for many generations, owning large 
estates. 
Thomas Przybylski was born near the town of Kozielsko, Poland, near 
the border line of Germany, in 1835, died June 20, 1889. In young man- 
hood he took an active part in the Polish Revolution of the early sixties, 




^W, ^:/^^^^x^.^^^j^^^^^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 799 

and in 1864 fled to America as a I'olish refugee. For a time he made his 
home in Baltimore, Maryland, then, by means of working on farms as he 
went, he made his way to Allegheny, Pennsylvania. After his marriage 
there he went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he partly learned the brewing 
trade. He then removed to Annapolis, Maryland, where he made his 
home, while he was employed in a brewery in Baltimore, and later had an 
interest in a brewery there and was assistant manager. In 1873 he returned 
to Poland with his family and there established a brewery which was a 
great success, as he managed it according to American ideas. While living 
in America, he worked under an assumed name, so that he could not be traced 
as a political refugee. The family was a well educated one, and English, 
German and Polish were spoken in the home with equal facility in each 
language. Mr. Przybylski married Mary B. Walters, born in Allegheny 
City, Pennsylvania, in 1835, died in March, 1897, whose parents were of 
English descent and of the Quaker faith, and lived on a farm just north 
of Allegheny City, now North Side, Pittsburgh. Mr. and Mrs. Przybylski 
had children: Louise Mary, married Herman Timer, and lives in Portland, 
Oregon; a daughter; Ladislaus Thomas, of further mention; Stanislaus, 
born in Poland, is employed on the railroad, and lives in Portland, Oregon. 
Rev. Ladislaus Thomas Przybylski, son of Thomas and Mary B. 
(Walters) Przybylski, w^as born in Annapolis, Maryland, May i, 1869. 
When a child of four years he was taken back to Poland, where he re- 
mained until about twenty years of age, receiving in that country such edu- 
cation as the schools afiforded. He was a student at the University of 
Greiswald for somewhat more than a year, when his father died, and he 
then returned to the United States. After spending a short time in the 
East and in Chicago, Illinois, he entered St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and was graduated in the class of 1893. He next went to St. 
Mary's University, Baltimore, Maryland, where he studied theology, and 
while doing this he taught in Walbrook College. In 1896 he was ordained 
a priest in the Roman Catholic Church (Polish), at Portland, Oregon, and 
was located near there for the next eight years. In detail his service was as 
follows : Fourteen months as assistant to the Right Rev. Charles G. O'Reilly, 
at Portland ; in charge of a Mission at New Era, above Oregon City, 
Oregon ; in charge of a Mission at Eugene City, Oregon ; in charge of a church 
at La Grande, Oregon. He was deeply in earnest in the discharge of the 
duties of these various positions, and finally the strenuous work impaired 
his health, and he returned to the East. After a period of rest he came to 
Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he was placed in charge 
of St. Anthony's (Polish) Roman Catholic Church, December 8, 1908. He 
has done much since that time to improve the condition of the church and 
everything connected with it, and is greatly beloved by his parishioners. 
When he took charge there was but one teacher employed in the school 
connected with the church, now four Sisters have charge of this, and they 
have a house of their own. The membership of the church has increased 



8oo WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

to two hundred and fifty families, he has lifted the debt on the church, and 
has added a number of class rooms. The church was organized and erected 
at Homestead by Father Henry Cichocki, and four prominent laymen, and 
after Father Cichocki had resigned from office, he had three successors — 
Fathers Julian Loniewuski, Francis Miskiewicz and Rev. L. Stec — before 
Rev. Ladislaus T. Przybylski took charge. 



William Edward Moyes is a member of a family representative 
MOYES of the best type of Scotch character, which has brought to 
the composition of the complex citizenship of the United States 
a leaven of peculiar value, consisting of the indomitable courage and hard- 
headed practicability for which the Scotch are so justly famous. 

(I) Mr. Moyes' paternal grandparents were Henry and Betsy (Lind- 
say) Moyes, both of whom passed their entire lives in Scotland, and died 
there at the ages of eighty-four and seventy-four years, respectively. They 
had nine children altogether, eight boys and one girl, three of the brothers 
and the sister coming eventually to the United States, over which their 
descendants are now pretty well scattered. 

(H) One of the brothers who came to tliis country was Andrew Moyes, 
the father of William Edward Moyes. His youth had been spent in his 
native Scotland, where also he had married Margaret Smeaton, a daughter 
of Edward and Ann (Brown) Smeaton, who later came to America with 
their eleven children and settled in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. The 
Smeatons were of a very long lived family, Mr. and Mrs. Smeaton dying 
at the ages of eighty-eight and ninety-two years, respectively, and all their 
children living to advanced old age. Andrew Moyes and his wife came to 
the L'nited States in the year 1845, and settled in Harmarville, Pennsylvania, 
where they made their home for two years. In his native land he had been 
a farmer, and now he found employment as a farm hand in a number of 
places. In 1847 he went to Ross Station, Pennsylvania, where he secured 
a permanent position as farmer with Mr. James Ross, in which service he 
remained until the year 1851, when he rented until the year 1876, and then 
purchased his own farm in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and operated it until 
the time of his wife's death. This event occurred in the year 1888, after which 
Mr. Moyes retired from all active life and went to live with his children. Here 
he remained until his own death, which occurred in his son's house in Sharps- 
burg, in 1892, in his eighty-first year. To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moyes were 
born seven children, as follows: i. Henry, who served in the Civil War in 
Company B, Sixty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was 
taken prisoner at Savage Station, and died in Libby Prison, September 23, 
1862, one day before he was to have been exchanged. 2. Anna, now Mrs. 
Livingood, of Cameron, Missouri. 3. Elizabeth, now Mrs. Little, of Oak- 
mont, Pennsylvania. 4. William Edward of whom further. 5. Robert, now 
a resident of Warren, Ohio. 6. James D.. a resident of Sharpsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 7. Mary, now Mrs. Slatter, also of Sharpsburg. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 8oi 

(ill) William Edward Moyes, fourth child of Andrew and Margaret 
(Smeaton) Moyes, was born at Ross Station, Pennsylvania, January 28, 
1848, the year following his parents' coming to the place. He was educated 
in what is now known as the Hoboken School, and after the completion of his 
studies, learned the trade of carpenter. This was in the spring of 1867, 
and he has ever since followed that trade with the exception of nine 
months in the year 1875, when he lived upon his father's place and there 
aided in the farm work. In 1878 he began contracting work and still con- 
tinues in this business, having prospered greatly and built some of the 
finest buildings in Sharpsburg. Mr. Moyes is a member of the Republican 
party, and has always taken a keen interest in political questions, whether 
of local or general application. He is a member of the local Order of the 
Independent Order of Odd F'ellows, having joined the society in the year 
1871, when it was first started in Sharpsburg. 

Mr. Moyes married, July 14, 1870, Mary Elizabeth Hobaugh, a native 
of Sharpsburg, a descendant of the Hobaugh family of Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. Her father was Samuel W. Hobaugh, a 
member of a Dutch family, born either in Westmoreland or Allegheny 
county, probably the former, about 1823, and died when only thirty years 
and nine months of age. He was a son of Peter and Rebecca (Watters) 
Hobaugh, who were residents of the neighborhood of Greensburg, West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania, where Peter Hobaugh was a shoemaker 
and a stone mason. Samuel W. Hobaugh, the father of Mrs. Moyes, was 
a brick maker, who plied his trade at East Liberty, Pennsylvania. He 
married Celista Bedaux, a daughter of Exiver and Mary A. (Burgess) 
Bedaux, natives of France, who had come from that country to America, 
and settled in Frenchtown, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and brought 
their daughter with them when she was but ten years of age. ]Mr. Bedaux 
was a weaver and lived on a farm near Frenchtown. His ancestors were 
Catholics in their own country. To Mr. and Mrs. Moyes have been born 
five children, as follows: i. Cora, died at the age of twenty-three years. 2. 
Ada, now Mrs. Charles Detlefts. 3. William, died when but two years of 
age. 4. L. Pearl, a teacher in the Sharpsburg public school. 5. Isala E., who 
lives at home with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Moyes are members of the 
Presbyterian Church, and are rearing their children in that persuasion. 



Among the representative citizens of Pittsburgh, whose suc- 

WINTER cessful careers have been the result of ability, both natural 

and acquired, of perseverance and determination to succeed, 

must be mentioned Henry Winter, a man well known in his community, 

honored and respected by all who know him for his sterling integrity of 

character. 

John Winter, father of Henry Winter, was bom in the town of Win- 
der- Saben, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, March 3, 1825, his parents also 
natives of the .same place where they lived and died, his father being a 



8o2 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

veterinary surgeon. John Winter grew to maturity in his native land, re- 
ceived his education and learned the trade of blacksmith ; he was very strong 
physically. In 1851, having decided to try his fortune in the New World, 
he accordingly emigrated to this country, settling in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he worked on the coal boats plying between Pittsburgh and 
New Orleans. In 1854 he sent for his sweetheart whom he had left in Ger- 
many, and they were married in Pittsburgh, taking up their residence on 
the South Side, on Twelfth street, near tlie Ferry. Mr. Winter then se- 
cured employment as a blacksmith in Lloyd's Steel Mill, and later worked in 
Wharton's Mill, Woods Nut Factory on Fourth avenue, where he was 
employed for fifteen years as a blacksmith. For three years prior to his 
death, which occurred January 18, 1891, he was retired from active pursuits. 
He and his wife were members of the Lutheran Church in their younger 
days, later affiliating with the German Evangelical Church. His wife, Anna 
IMarea (Schafifer) Winter, born in town of Rinderbugen, Hesse-Darmstadt, 
Germany, in 1828, died in 1894. Her parents were born, lived and died in 
Germany, residing near the town of Ober-Semen, her father being a sheep 
stockman. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Winter: i. Henry, of whom further. 
2. Henrietta, deceased, was wife of Christ Albitz, of South Side. 3. John, 
a glass worker, resides on Sixteenth street, South Side. 4. Mary, married 
Theodore Steineke, a carpenter, resides on Jane street, South Side. 5. 
Charles, a tool-keeper in a glass factory. 6. William, a carpenter, resides 
in Carrick. 

Henry Winter was born on South Side, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 
15, 1856. He attended the Tenth street Bedford public school on the South 
Side, completing his studies at the age of eleven years, when he began work 
in the old McKee Glass House, remaining there until he was sixteen years 
of age, where he worked as a helper under his father at Wood's Nut Factory, 
remaining for two years. He then secured work in SchafTer's Wagon 
Works, and at the expiration of six months accepted a position in the 
Locomotive Works at Hatfield, Pennsylvania. Plis next position was as 
tool-maker for the firm of Kline & Logan, where he remained for two years, 
and the following year he worked at the McBeth Glass House. He then 
entered the employ of Woods-Lloyds Company, serving at first as black- 
smith and later as a gas engine compressor, remaining with them for a num- 
ber of years. In 1904 he purchased a strip of real estate in Mount Oliver 
borough, upon which he erected dwelling houses, renting the same, from 
which he receives a substantial income, and he is also the owner of con- 
siderable property in Jeannette, Pennsylvania. Being a skilled mechanic, an 
expert in various lines, he was able to perform the work himself, thus in- 
suring thorough workmansliip. In 1887 he erected a residence for himself 
at No. 164 Arlington avenue, South Side, where he has since resided. He 
is a director in the South Side Mutual Progressive Building and Loan As- 
sociation, a Republican in politics, and he and his wife are members of 
the German Evangelical Church. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 803 

Mr. Winter married, May 4, 1881, Hannah E. Baumbach, born on 
South Side, Pittsburgh, daughter of Charles and Linda (Beyer; Baumbach, 
natives of Bavaria. Charles Baumbach came to the United States with his 
parents from Saxony when he was thirteen years of age, learned the trade 
of shoemaker, was later a saddler, and during the Civil War performed 
some work at his trade for the United States government; he lived on South 
Side, Pittsburgh; his wife came to the United States at eighteen years of 
age; they were members of the Lutheran Church; he is deceased, but she 
is living at the present time (1914). Mr. and Mrs. Winter are the parents 
of eleven children: I. Catherine K., born July 26, 1882; married Charles 
Campbell, a tower operator on the Pittsburgh, Lisbon & Western Railroad ; 
resides on Fremont street. Mount Oliver, Pennsylvania. 2. Annie, born 
January 12, 1884, died August 14, 1886. 3. John, born November 22, 
1885; a pattern maker; married Stella Ohlnhausen ; resides at Bon Air, a 
part of Pittsburgh. 4. Adolph W., born November 16, 1887; a steel and 
copper plate engraver ; married Janet Brown ; resides in Mount Oliver, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Charles F., born September 22, 1889; a mail carrier; re- 
sides at home. 6. Elizabeth L., born April 24, 1892, died September 19, 
1901. 7. Henry, born September 24, 1894. 8. Herbert B., born September 
2y, 1896. 9. Johanna E. A., born December 22, 1898; a student in high 
school. 10. Gilbert Louis, born August 19, 1900; a student in high school. 
II. Elmer Chester, born April 30, 1903. 



Dr. Harry James Welch, son of a family native to Washing- 
WELCH ton county, Pennsylvania, has made Allegheny county the 
scene of his active professional labors. The former county 
has been the home of the family for at least three generations. 

(H) Abel Welch, son of James Welch, and grandfather of Dr. Welch, 
owned a farm about one hundred and fifty acres in extent, in Washington 
county. He was a Republican in political belief and with his family was a 
member of the United Presbyterian Church. He married and had an only 
child: James Hutchinson, of whom further. 

(HI) James Hutchinson Welch, only child of Abel Welch, was born 
near West Alexander, Washington county, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1838, and 
died April 26, 1909. When he was a lad six years of age his father moved 
from the farm near West Alexander to another property he had purchased 
in Independence township, Washington county, and here James Hutchinson 
Welch grew to mature years, in his youth attending the public schools. 
Upon his father's death he inherited a part of the home farm, later buyin^ 
the interests of two of his co-heirs, subsequently adding to this by purchase, 
until at the time of his death he held title to more than four hundred acres 
in that vicinity. This he farmed, maintaining a generous share as pasture, 
where early in life he raised large numbers of sheep, an occupation at that 
time as profitable as agricultural pursuits. Strongly Republican, he was 
prominent in public afifairs, and served as school director and as justice of 



8o4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the peace, holding the latter office for a period of twenty-one years. For 
nearly forty years he was a member of the session of the United Presby- 
terian Church, carefully ordering his life in accordance with the tenets of 
his faith. He married Sarah Jane, born in Independence township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pennsylvania, in December, 1840, died April 20, 1913, daughter 
of Samuel Gibson, her parents both natives of Washington county, where 
the Gibson family had been resident for generations. Samuel Gibson was a 
farmer in Independence township, retiring as old age approached and mov- 
ing to Savannah, Ashland county, Ohio, his home until his death. The 
family were members of the United Presbyterian Church. Children of 
Samuel Gibson: i. Nancy, married Thomas Zigler, and moved from Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, to Ashland county, Ohio. 2. Sarah Jane, of 
previous mention, married James Hutchinson Welch. 3. Hattie, married 
Henderson Orr, deceased, a minister of the United Presbyterian church, and 
lives in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania. 4. John P., a physician of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. Children of James Hutchinson and Sarah Jane (Gibson) 
Welch: i. Eva, died in March, 1913, married Elmer Gregg, and lived on a 
farm in Ashland county, Ohio. 2. Leila, married John N. Grimes, a livery- 
man of West x'\lexander, Pennsylvania, formerly proprietor of a dairy. 3. 
Hattie, married William C. Carmen, a deputy revenue collector. Their 
home is in Ingram, Pennsylvania. 4. Samuel Johnston, an insurance and 
real estate dealer of McKee's Rocks, Pennsylvania, married Lulu Reed. 
5. Mary, unmarried, resides in Ingram, Pennsylvania. 6. Gertrude, un- 
married, lives with her sister, Mary, in Ingram, Pennsylvania. 7. Maud, 
married John Hodson, a butcher, of Houston, Pennsylvania. 8. Harry 
James, of whom further. 9. Valeria, unmarried, lives in Ingram, Pennsyl- 
vania, with her sisters, Mary and Gertrude. 10. John R., a physician of 
Columbus, Ohio, married Evelyn Bigger. 

(IV) Harry James Welch, son of James Hutchinson and Sarah Jane 
(Gibson) Welch, was born in Independence township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, August 30, 1876, and was there a student in the public schools, 
spending his youth on the home farm. He later attended the Indiana and 
California State Normal Schools, then returning to the farm was there 
employed for a short time, afterward accepting and holding for about two 
years a position as clerk in T. J. Adamson's store, at Independence, Penn- 
sylvania. In October, 1902, he entered the dental school of the University 
of Pittsburgh, whence he was graduated D.D.S. in 1905, having in that insti- 
tution been chosen a member of the Psi Omega dental fraternity. Since 
August 3, 1905, he has been a practitioner in Ingram, Pennsylvania, where, 
through dint of diligent application to his profession and a splendid knowledge 
thereof, he has arrived at a commanding position in the dental profession. He 
holds membership in the Pennsylvania Slate Dental Association and the 
Odontological Dental Society, of Pittsburgh. His fraternal society is the 
Masonic, in which he belongs to Grafton Lodge, No. 653. Free and Accepted 
Masons ; Cyrus Chapter, No. 26, Royal Arch Masons ; Chartiers Command- 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 805 

ery, No. 78, of Carnegie, Pennsylvania, Knights Templar; and the Pennsyl- 
vania Consistory, of Pittsburgh. He and his wife are members of the 
United Presbyterian church, of Ingram. Socially, fraternally, and pro- 
fessionally. Dr. Welch has been cordially received, and the closer acquaint- 
ance of a ten years' contact with him in these walks of life has but fastened 
him more firmly in the consideration and aiifection of the many friends he 
has made in that time. 

He married, August 19, 1909, Vera G., born in Allegheny City (Pitts- 
burgh North Side), Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of George 
Hale and Emma (Thompson) Getty, residents of New Wilmington. Penn- 
sylvania. Her father was a member of the ministry of the United Presby- 
terian church until failing health compelled his resignation therefrom, his 
present calling being that of state bank examiner. Children of Dr. Harry 
James and Vera G. (Getty) Welch: i. Virginia, born November 27, 1910. 
2. Gretchen, born December 25, 1912. 



The Old Dominion is the state that gave to Pennsylvania 
WALTER this line of Walters, Philip Walter, a native of that state, 

coming thence with his wife, also born there, to Beaver Run, 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer by occupation, cul- 
tivating two hundred acres of land, and also profited by teaming from 
Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, using a Conestoga wagon of the old type to carry 
his loads. His industry brought him gratifying financial returns, and at his 
death, aged about sixty-two years, the fruits of his active life were the goodly 
inheritance he bequeathed to his family. He married Catherine Trout, and 
had children: i. John, died retired in Westmoreland county, a farmer, stock- 
raiser, and axe manufacturer. 2. Balzer, a farmer, died in Indiana county, 
Pennsylvania. 3. Peggy, married William Shafer, and died in Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania. 4. David, of whom further. 5. Jacob, a farmer, died 
in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 6. George, died on the Walter homestead 
in 1912. 7. Catherine, lives unmarried on the homestead, an invalid. 8. 
Susan, deceased ; married Michael Dewalt. 

(II) David Walter, son of Philip and Catherine (Trout) Walter, was 
born in Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, in 1814, died in Tennessee. 
After his marriage he made his home in his native county, and was succes- 
sively engaged as a blacksmith, merchant, and produce dealer. In 1870 he 
purchased a large tract of land in the coffee district of Tennessee, where 
his death took place. His wife returned to Pennsylvania, and lived until 
her death with a daughter. Nancy Jane (Mrs. William Alcorn 1. Mr. 
Walter was deeply interested in national politics, and that he was open to 
conviction as to the merits of an opponent's belief is shown bv his change 
of party allegiance, he having first been a Democrat, then an Abolitionist, 
and finally a Republican. Both he and his wife were members of the Pres- 
byterian church, and at his death he held a position upon the board of 
trustees of Manchester College, Tennessee. His fraternal society was the 



8o6 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married, in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, Dorcas, born in Westmoreland county in 1811, died in Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of David Carnahan, her father, of Irish descent, a native 
of eastern Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, he and his brother, John, being 
early settlers in Perryville, Westmoreland county, where he held title to con- 
siderable property. David Carnahan was the father of : i. John, a farmer, 
moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio and there died. 2. Dorcas, of previous 
mention, married David Walter. 3. Robert, married and died in young man- 
hood in Westmoreland county. 4. George, a school teacher, died in young 
manhood. 5. 2^Iary, died unmarried in young womanhood. 6. Jane, married 
Andrew Blair and died near Apollo, Westmoreland county. Children of 
David and Dorcas (Carnahan) Walter: i. Philip, a farmer, died in Tennes- 
see. 2. Nancy Jane, married William Alcorn and lives in Westmoreland 
county. 3. David C, a farmer of Westmoreland county. 4. Labanna H., of 
whom further. 5. Melvina, married Christian Williamson, and lives near 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Labanna H. Walter, son of David and Dorcas (Carnahan) Wal- 
ter, was born in Washington township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
April 18, 1844, and there attended the public schools. In September, 1864, 
he enlisted in Company H, Fifteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, and 
was a member of that company until the final declaration of peace, par- 
ticipating in several hard-fought engagements without receiving a wound 
of any kind. For the fifteen years following the war he engaged in work 
at the blacksmith's trade in Westmoreland and Armstrong counties, in the 
fall of 1882 moving to Mansfield (now Carnegie), where he has since made 
his home. His beginning in business in this place was as the employee of 
several real estate dealers, a line in which he later established independently, 
continuing with marked success until the present time. Mr. Walter has 
gained a permanent reputation in Carnegie as a keen and forceful business 
man, his work having brought not only profit and reputation to him but bene- 
fit to Carnegie. His real estate operations do not occupy his entire time, for 
he is the representative of some of the leading insurance companies of the 
country, among them the Girard, of Philadelphia; the Farmers', of York, 
Pennsylvania; the Allemannia, of Pittsburgh; the Niagara, of New York; 
the New Hampshire, of Manchester, New Hampshire ; the Delaware 
Underwriters', of Westchester, Pennsylvania ; and the Royal, of Liverpool. 
He is a charter member and an organizer of the Anchor Building and Loan 
Association, and has been an officer thereof since its formation twenty-seven 
years ago, having filled all of the offtcial positions and is at the present 
time serving as treasurer. His name in connection with a business enter- 
prise in the Carnegie district is at once a proof of its reliability and his 
confidence in the project, for throughout his entire business career he has 
jealously guarded himself from even the appearance of a slight deviation 
from a course of the strictest regularity in all of his dealings, a fact that 
has more than once counted in his favor. In political matters he has never 











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WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 807 

taken active part, casting his ballot with the Republican party. With his 
wife he is a member of the Presbyterian church, and in the organization of 
that body has held all of the offices, serving at this time (1914J as elder. 
He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and to the Royal Arcanum. 
Mr. Walter married, March 15, 1870, Anna Mary, lx)rn in Butler 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth ( Calhoun j Thorne, 
her father a native of Butler county, her mother born in Westmoreland 
county. Robert Thorne was a school teacher, and died while principal of 
the Kittanning schools, his widow marrying (second) Zachariah Phillips. 
Children of Labanna H. and Anna Mary (Thorne) Walter: i. John T., 
lives with his parents, unmarried. 2. David J., lives at home, unmarried, 
associated in business with his father. 



This name appears in different forms in the early settlement 
BEEDLE of the colonies, the most usual of which was Beedle. It was 
also often found as Bedell, which has since been borne by 
many citizens active and skillful in the professions, and in the arts of 
peace and war. In early records the name is variously spelled as Baetle, 
Beedle, Bedle, Beadle, Bedell and Bedel, all undoubtedly having had a com- 
mon origin. The family under discussion here is one of more recent advent 
in this country, but they have already proved their worth as citizens. 

Edward Beedle was born in Wales and spent his entire life in that 
country. He was a farm worker and made yearly trips to England, work- 
ing there in the harvest season regularly. He married Margaret Humphries, 
also a native of Wales, and they had a large family, of whom was Evan, of 
further mention, and Stephen, who emigrated to the United States, and 
located at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he was the proprietor of a 
hotel, the House at Home, at the corner of Grant and Water streets. He 
died in Pittsburgh. 

Evan Beedle, son of Edward and Margaret (Humphries) Beedle, was 
born in Wales, February 4, 1834, died April 10, 1913. He emigrated to 
America at the same time as his brother Stephen, and in 1868 located at 
Jones Station, on the State pike, Jefferson township, Allegheny countv, 
Pennsylvania. There he built a general store with the management 
of which he was identified until shortly before his death, when ill 
health compelled him to retire. In addition to this he carried on several 
other enterprises at the same time. Since his death his widow has carried 
on the business very successfully, in fact, she had practically had charge of it 
for some time prior to this sad event. He was but sixteen years of age 
when he left his native land, lived but a short time in Pittsburgh, and tlien 
went to McKeesport, where he was employed about the coal mines and 
tipples. Later he made several trips down the Ohio river with coal boats 
for Louisville, Kentucky, and being thrifty and economical, saved a con- 
siderable amount of money. Just before going upon one of these trips he 
loaned one thousand dollars to a McKeesport coal operator, and upon his 



8o8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

return one year later, the loan was repaid with interest at seven per cent. 
Mr. Beedle had expected only the return of the capital, but with this added 
sum and what he had already possessed he commenced investing in coal 
property on the Monongahela river, and was very successful. He was asso- 
ciated with Alexander Dempster, Allen Kirkpatrick and A. M. Scott for 
many years, all of Pittsburgh, in the operation of the Hilldale and Coal 
Bluff Mines, and afterward sold these to the Monongahela River Consoli- 
dated Coal & Coke Company, at which time Mr. Beedle retired from coal 
operation activities. He was greatly interested in the subject of Welsh 
music, especially vocal, and rarely missed any of their large song festivals. 
At the time of his death he was a director of the First National Bank of 
West Elizabeth, and was the owner of a considerable quantity of real estate 
in Homestead, McKeesport, Duquesne, and in Jefferson township. Two 
years prior to his death he was injured by a bull which had escaped from a 
field near his home, and his death was indirectly a result of these injuries, he 
being unable to leave his home for two months before his death. He was a 
strong supporter of the Republican party, but never desired to hold public 
office. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Beedle married, in January, 1858, Sarah Ann Hodgson, born on 
South Side, Pittsburgh, near Mount Oliver, June 12, 1840, a daughter of 
William and Charlotte (Watson) Hodgson, the former born in Derbyshire, 
England, the latter in Lancashire, England. Mrs. Hodgson came to Pitts- 
burgh with her parents when she was twelve years of age, and her husband 
came to the United States and settled in Pittsburgh when he was thirty-five 
years old. He was a coal operator along the Monongahela river at three 
different mines, and died at the age of eighty-five years, while his wife died 
at the age of sixty-five. They had children: i. Sarah Ann, mentioned 
above. 2. Clementine, married James Mort, now both deceased. 3. William, 
died of typhoid fever at the age of twenty-three years. 4. Aaron, died at 
the age of nineteen years. 5. Mary Jane, married Dr. Charles Black, of 
McKeesport. Mr. and Mrs. Beedle have had children: i. William, retired 
from business, lives at Elrama, Pennsylvania; married Appelonia Stilley. 
2. Edward W., engaged in the real estate and insurance business at West 
Elizabeth. 3. Stephen, engaged in the real estate business at Homestead, 
Pennsylvania. 4. Henry, a riverman, living at Jones Station ; married May 
Sheible. 5. John Madison, a boss in a steel mill, lives at Blair, Pennsyl- 
vania. 6. Evan Jr., unmarried. 7. Sarah Ann, married Roland Latta, lives 
in McKeesport. 8. Charlotte, married George Maurer, lives in Blair, Penn- 
sylvania. 9. Margaret, married E. P. Jones, lives at Jones Station, where 
he is a pure food inspector. The family are Presbyterians. 



James Speer, who founded the American branch of the Scotch 
SPEER Speer family, came from Scotland in 1750 and settled in Mary- 
land, where he lived until 1764, when he came to Pennsylvania 
and purchased the farm in Stowe township (now Kennedy), Allegheny 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 809 

county, where some of his descendants still live. He had four sons and 
three daughters. 

( II ) James ( 2) Speer, son of James ( i ) Speer, was born in Maryland, 1 754. 
He owned a large farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
He married Mary, daughter of Roly and Nancy Boyd. James and Mary Speer 
had thirteen children, among whom were : i. Roland, a farmer of Moon town- 
ship. 2. James, a farmer of Robinson township. 3. Robert, a farmer of 
Moon township, married Sarah Simpson. 4. John, of further mention. 5. 
Ann, married Jonathan Philips, and lived in Moon township. 6. Polly, mar- 
ried James Robinson, a carpenter and farmer. 7. Jane, married Daniel 
Ewing, a farmer of Robinson township. 8. Alexander, married Margaret 

and lived in Pittsburgh. 9. Agnes, married John Ritchie, and 

lived in Pittsburgh. James Speer died in 1847, and his wife died in 1859. 

(III) John Speer, fourth son of John (2) and Mary (Boyd) Speer, 
was born on the Speer farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1817, died March 9, 1903. He there grew to manhood, in- 
heriting a part of his father's farm, on which he spent his life. To this 
he added by purchase and on his land built a substantial brick farm house 
that is yet standing and in use. He conducted general farming operations 
and prospered in all his undertakings. He was a Republican in politics, 
served the town as assessor, and was a member of Forest Grove Presby- 
terian Church. He married Sarah King McCoy, born on the McCoy home- 
stead on Chartier's Creek, March 21, 1828, died February 8, 191 1, eldest 
daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Wilson) McCoy, granddaughter of 
Thomas and Jane McCoy, who came from county Antrim, Ireland, in 1790, 
settling in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and mater- 
nal granddaughter of James Craig and Nancy Wilson, early settlers in Moon 
township (see McCoy). Children of John and Sarah King (McCoy) Speer: 
I. Vienna S., born April 29, 1854; married, October 5, 1875, George Mag- 
nus, and they lived at Palmerville, Robinson township, for some years, where 
he was a wagon builder ; they moved to Coraopolis, where he continued car- 
riage and wagon building until his death, June 23, 1900 ; Mrs. Magnus and her 
children, six daughters and one son, moved to Wilkinsburg, where she made 
her home the remainder of her days; she died April 26, 1906; her mother 
accompanied her to Wilkinsburg and there lived until her death February 8, 
191 1. 2. Elvader K., of further mention. 3. Wilson B., worked at the 
home farm and there died October 19, 1898, unmarried. 

(IV) Elvader King Speer, eldest son of John and Sarah King (McCoy) 
Speer, was born on the old James Speer farm, now Kennedy, then Robin- 
son township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1856. He at- 
tended the "Clever" District School and remained at the home farm manag- 
ing the property until his father's death. His sister, Mrs. IMagnus, inherited 
half of the home farm. Elvader K. the other half, they being the only living 
children of their parents, and he also inherited the West Park farm which 
his mother inherited as her share of the McCoy estate. In 1907 Mr. Speer 



8io WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

erected a modern frame residence on the bluff back of West Park, which 
has ever since been his home. He is a RepubHcan in poUtics and for past 
eight years has served Kennedy township as collector of taxes. For the 
past thirteen years he has held the office of elder of Forest Grove Presby- 
terian Church, his wife also being a communicant of that faith. 

Mr. Speer married, June 12, 1907, Stella Stoddard, born in Moon 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Andrew L. and 
Catherine (Scott) Stoddard, both also born in Moon township. Andrew L. 
Stoddard was born on the Stoddard homestead, March 11, 1835, died De- 
cember 15, 191 1. He was a farmer all his life, school director, Republican, and 
with his wife belonged to the Presbyterian Church. He was a veteran of the 
Civil War, seeing three years of hard service with Company C, One Hundred 
and Second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Catherine (Scott) 
Stoddard, his wife, was born on the Montour Creek farm of her parents, 
March 12, 1838, died January 20, 1912. Children: i. Charles, now living in 
Kansas. 2. Stella, married Elvader K. Speer, of previous mention. 3. 
Lena, married Frank S. Rowe, and resides in Crafton, Pennsylvania. An- 
drew L. Stoddard was a son of Robert and Margaret (Crooks) Stoddard, 
Robert also born in Moon township, their families being the early 
settlers of that township. Catherine Scott was a daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (McCormick) Scott, the former born in county Down, Ireland, 
brought when a lad to this country by his parents and became the owner of 
a farm of three hundred acres and of a large fulling mill standing on his 
farm. Mary McCormick was born in Moon township, the only daughter 
of her parents. Children of Elvader K. and Stella (Stoddard) Speer: i. 
John Orin, born May 26, 1908. 2. Lucille, born October 31, 1910. 3. A 
twin with Lucille, died at birth. 4. Donald, born March 13, 1912. 



Frederick Rucker, of Bellevue, Pennsylvania, descends from 
RUCKER a long line of German ancestors and is himself a native of 
Germany. He was born July 24, 1858, in Fagstheim on the 
Fagst, Upper District of Khreilsheim, Kingdom of Wuerttemberg. situated 
three hundred and thirty-eight miles northwest of Berlin on the Pregel river. 
It was at Wuerttemberg, in the Lutheran Palace Church, that Frederick I., 
the first monarch of Wuerttemberg, who bore the title of King, placed the 
royal crown on his head in 1701 and here also William I. was crowned. 
The city is an important one and now contains over two hundred thousand 
population. Frederick (2) Rucker is a son of Frederick (i) and Mary 
Rucker (German spelling being Riecker), his father a farmer who lived 
and died in Germany. Children: i. Frederick, of further mention. 2. Mag- 
dalena, married Michael Brooker, of Butler county, Pennsylvania. 3. 
George, died in Baltimore. Maryland, aged nineteen years. 4. Conrad and 
wife, Elizabeth, now residing in the state of Ohio. 5. Mary, married Adam 
Philips, a contractor and builder of Pittsburgh North Side. 6. Caroline, 
married a Mr. Hohll, and lives in Germany. 



WESTERN PEN N SYLVAN J A 8ii 

Frederick (2) Rucker was educated in excellent German schools, and 
under the law of compulsory military service served his allotted time in the 
German army. After leaving the army he engaged in farming until he 
came to the United States, locating in iialtimore, Maryland, where he re- 
mained two years. He then came to Western Pennsylvania, locating in 
Allegheny City, where for two years he worked as a quarryman, then be- 
came a teamster and for seven years was so engaged. In 1892 he pur- 
chased his present farm of fifty acres in Ohio township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, near Bellevue, where he has since been engaged in farming, 
market gardening and teaming. He married, soon after coming to the 
United • States, Mary Stocker, and with nothing but German tlirift and 
pluck to start with, they have earned a good farm and comfortable 
home. They are members of St. James Lutheran Church, and in 
politics Mr. Rucker is a Republican. Children: i. Rosa, born February 
21, 1881, married Charles Sellhouse. 2. Mary, born February 11, 1884, 
married John Knox. 3. Frederick, born April 30, 1889. 4. Kathryn, born 
November 30, 1891. 5. Anna, born May 26, 1894. 6. William, born July 
10, 1896. 7. Charles, born June 26, 1898. 



The old Riley farm in Franklin township, Allegheny county, 
RILEY Pennsylvania, was originally owned by John Riley, grandfather 
of Walter W. Riley, the present owner, one of the prosperous 
farmers of the township. John Riley, of Irish parentage, married Jane 
Grossman, and had issue : Mary, born December 7, 1835 ; Jane, April 8, 
1838; William H. H., of further mention; Lovina, born April 18 1842; 
Hannah, May 10, 1844; Washington W., November 25, 1846; David E., 
May 16, 1849. 

(11) William H. H. Riley, son of John and Jane (Grossman) Riley, 
was born on the old Riley farm in Franklin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, July 3, 1840, died May 8, 1899. He attended public schools, 
was his father's assistant for many years and finally became owner of the 
property containing one hundred and sixty acres of fertile land. The house 
was erected by John Riley, but all other buildings were erected by William 
H. H. Riley. He prospered in business and was one of the influential men 
of his day, serving as justice of the peace, assessor and school director. He 
was an active member of the Presbyterian Church, serving for many years 
as trustee. He married Fanny Morrow, who survived him until November 
21, 1912, daughter of William Morrow. Children: Annie May. born August 
28, 1867, married Lynn Vandevort ; Walter W., of furtlier mention. 

(Ill) Walter W. Riley, only son of William H. H. and Fanny 
(Morrow) Riley, was born on the old Riley farm, in Franklin township. 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, that he now owns, September 2. 1869. He 
attended public schools and remained at home, his father's assistant, until 
in youthful manhood he located on an adjoining farm. He only remained 
there three and a half years, then returned to the home farm, containing 



8i3 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

one hundred and twenty acres, which with that exception has always been 
his home. He is an elder of the Presbyterian Church, a Republican in 
politics, and has served as township auditor. Mr. Riley married Leolphy 
Parks, born on Pittsburgh South Side, August 20, 1872, daughter of Samuel 
and Mary Jane (Wright) Parks, whose children were Leolphy, Volney 
Etoile, Tellus R. J., died in infancy, Everson Edgar, William Wellington, 
died May i, 1913. Children of Walter W. and Leolphy (Parks) Riley: 
Elda May, born September 13, 1897; William Herbert, February 10, 1900; 
Fanny Myrtle, December 26, 1903; a son unnamed. January 29, 1906; Ches- 
ter Harris, March 25, 1907; Iva Mary, June 26, 1909; Eulah Estella, May 

4, 1912. 

After an active life of seventy years spent in the peace- 
REDPATH ful life of a farmer, Baxter S. Redpath, of McCandless 

township, gives little evidence that he has spanned the 
years allotted to man by the Scriptures. From this seventy years of 
"peaceful life" must be deducted the three of warfare passed as a soldier 
of the Union, of hard service in which he fought in twenty-eight battles, 
coming through without a wound, although struck by several bullets, 
knocked down by one that struck his belt buckle, another that pierced his 
canteen, another that he picked out of his blanket roll and struck by several 
that passed through his clothing without injury to his body. 

(I) Robert Redpath, grandfather of Baxter S. Redpath, came from 
Ireland to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 181 5, and became owner of 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Franklin township. His wife, 
Elizabeth, whom he married in Ireland, resided on the Franklin township 
farm until death closed their labors. Children: John, Margaret, Robert. 

(II) John Redpath, son of Robert and Elizabeth Redpath, was born in 
county Down, Ireland, in 181 1, died in McCandless township, Allegheny 
county, Pennsylvania, November 22, 1869. Fie was four years of age when 
brought by his parents to Western Pennsylvania and there grew to man- 
hood. His minority was spent in Franklin township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, his father's farm assistant, his latter years on his own farm 
of one hundred and thirty acres, which he purchased in McCandless town- 
ship. He improved his farm by the erection of the buildings now in use 
and brought the land to a good, fertile condition. He was a member of 
the United Brethren Church, and was collector of taxes in Franklin town- 
ship. He married, February 22, 1838, Mary Hamilton, born in 181 1, died 
April 7, 1891, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Hamilton. Children: 
I. Sarah Ann, born December 28, 1838, married David Reel. 2. Robert, 
born August 22. 1840, died in the Union army, a private of Company I, 
Sixty-first Regiment Volunteer Infantry; unmarried. 3. Baxter S., of 
further mention. 4. Ellis, born May 22, 1846; married Adelaide Allen. 

5. Leonidas, born November 20, 1847 \ married Etta Reese. 6. Margaret 
Elizabeth, born February 6, 185 1 ; never married. 7. Newton H., born 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 813 

September 17, 1853; married Nettie . 8. Emma, born November 21, 

1856; married Charles T. Thompson. 

(Ill) Baxter S. Redpath, second son of John and Mary (ilamilton) 
Redpath, was born in McCandless township, Allegheny county, I'cnnsyl- 
vania, January 19, 1844. He was educated in public schools of the town- 
ship, and worked at the home farm until 1862, when he enlisted in Company 
F, One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, 
serving three years. He saw hard service with the Army of the Potomac, 
being engaged in twenty-eight different battles. At Cold Harbor, a ball 
struck his belt buckle, knocking him down. He did not relish the thought 
of confinement in a Southern prison and resolved to make a break for 
liberty. He used his heels to good purpose and gained a good start, then 
the guard began firing on him. One bullet passed through his canteen 
and another struck his blanket that was strapped between his shoulders, 
passing about half way to the flesh. But he escaped without a wound and 
rejoined his regiment. After his safe return from the war he became a 
general farmer and one of the successful men of the township. He is also 
president of the McCandless Township Mutual Fire Insurance Comanpy. 
He is a member of Highland Presbyterian Church. He married Anna E. 
Kennedy, born December 13, 1847. Children of Baxter S. and Anna E. 
Redpath: i. Nancy Mary, married Lee Herbert and has a daughter, Anna, 
married James Smith and has a son, Baxter S. Smith. 2. Lida, married 
William Groah; children: Gladys, Leo Bird, Milo, Pinerva, Mildred. 3. 
Newton H., married Mary McKinney ; children : Beulah, Blanche, Ellis W. 

The Bossert family came to this country from Alsace- 
BOSSERT Lorraine, and they combine with the grace and versatility 

of the French the progressive methods of the Americans 
to excellent effect. 

Matthew Bossert was born in Alsace, France, February 27, 1807, died 
at Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in September, 1886. He 
came to America in 1839 with his wife and one daughter, and settled in 
Little Falls, New York. He had been a weaver by trade in his native 
country, and his wife had assisted him in this occupation. In Little Falls 
he worked in the paper mills until 1846, when he removed to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, and found employment in a glass house, first as a mixer and 
later as a melter, and held this position until old age obliged him to abandon 
it. He then occupied himself with driving a water wagon, delivering water 
to people at twelve cents per barrel. He had been a soldier in France for 
six years, and served his country bravely. He and his wife were members 
of St. Michael's Catholic Church, and he was also a member of St. Michael's 
Society. He married, in Alsace, Anna Mary Hirsch, born November 2, 
1808, died in May, 1877, and they had children: Barbara, born in Alsace 
in 1837, is now the widow of Michael Krebs. and residing in New Bedford, 
Massachusetts ; Valentine, of further mention ; Caroline, widow of George 



8i4 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Werliue, lives in Homestead; Charles, a glass worker, died in Homestead; 
John, also a glass worker, died in Homestead ; live who died in infancy. 

Valentine Bossert, son of Matthew and Anna Mary (Hirsch) Bossert, 
was born at Little Falls, Herkimer county. New York, August 23, 1839. He 
had but limited opportunities for acquiring an education, as he attended the 
public schools only until he was nine years of age. He then commenced 
working in the glass plant of Bryce Brothers, on South Side, Pittsburgh, 
and when this company moved to Homestead in 1880 he' went with them, 
continuing to work for them until seven years prior to his death, in all about 
forty-seven years, a record creditable alike to employer and employed. He 
had held the position of foreman many years, and was considered an espe- 
cially skilled workman. When he retired from active work he made his 
home at No. 123 Fourth avenue, Homestead, residing there until his death, 
November 8, 1910. He was a strong supporter of the Democratic party, 
and he and his wife were members of the Roman Catholic Church. He was 
a member of the Knights of St. George ; member and manager of the Tur- 
ner Society ; and treasurer of Glassmakers' Union, No. 65. 

Mr. Bossert married, October 8, 1863, Margaret Denk, born in Prussia, 
Germany, Mayi, 1844, daughter of Michael and Margaret (Peter) Denk, 
who came to this country from Prussia in 1847 ^"^ located on South Side, 
Pittsburgh. Mr. Denk had been a glass worker in Germany, but here he 
became a mine worker, and died in Port Perry in 1854. Mrs. Denk died in 
1887. Both were members of the Catholic Church, and had children : John, 
manager of a glass plant, died in Pittsburgh ; Margaret, mentioned above ; 
Catherine, widow of Henry Strodmeyer, lives at Franklin, Pennsylvania; 
Alexander, a jeweler, died in Pittsburgh ; Sophia, widow of Jacob Berger, 
lives in Franklin, Pennsylvania ; Mary, died at the age of twelve years. Mrs. 
Margaret ( Denk ) Bossert was educated in the public and parochial schools. 
In 1885 she, on her own initiative, started a grocery store and bakery in 
the front part of the house in which she lived, and this proved such a suc- 
cessful venture, that in 1892 the front of the house was remodeled for store 
purposes, and she has conducted this business ever since that time. She is a 
woman of unusual business ability and energy, and richly deserves the suc- 
cess she has achieved. Mr. and Mrs. Bossert have had children: Valentine 
Matthew, unmarried, is associated with his mother in the conduct of the 
business; Anna Mary, died at the age of fifteen years; Margaret, married 
Gustav H. Dietrich, and lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma ; John, a painter, lives at 
Whittaker, married Emma Merchant, of Watertown. N. Y. ; Alexander, died 
at the age of six years ; Ida, married John Heuer, lives in Homestead ; 
Helen, married James Treloar, liyes in Homestead ; Emma, married John 
Bendell, lives in Homestead Park ; Loretta, married Jolin Cosgrove. lives 
in Homestead ; Mark, a street car conductor, lives at Beechview, married 
Elizabeth W^ells. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Bossert has twenty-one 
grandchildren. 




"iO^^di/tve SSo^i^^e/f't 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 815 

The first of the Irish family of iMcCaguc to receive mention 

McCAGUE in this Hne is Edward McCague, who was a resident of 

county Roscommon, Ireland. He was a Catholic and reared 

a large family in that faith, one of his sons, James, becoming a priest of the 

Roman Catholic Church, and of another, John, further mention is made. 

(II) John McCague, son of Edward McCague, pas.sed his life as a 
farmer, owning land in county (Jalway, where he died in young manhood. 
He was a member of the Roman Catholic Church. Four children survived 
him, one, Edward, the youngest, of further mention. 

(HI) Edward McCague, son of John McCague, was born in county 
Galway. Ireland, where he died, aged sixty-eight years. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and for many years was manager of an estate. He and his 
wife were members of the Roman Catliolic Church. He married Sarah 
O'Donnelly, who died aged ninety-eight years, daughter of a physician well 
and favorably known in that day. Among the children of Edward and 
Sarah (O'Donnelly) McCague was John, of whom further. 

(IV) John (2) McCague, son of Edward and Sarah (O'Donnelly) 
McCague, was born in county Galway, Ireland, June 21, 1819, died in 
February, 1903. He grew to manhood on the farm in county Galway, and 
there married, continuing to work on the farm until, in 1845, he moved to 
Derbyshire, England ; some years later he moved to Yorkshire, England. He 
retired from active business in 1886, imigrating to the United States, his 
death occurring in Homestead, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. His wife 
died in England ; both were members of the Roman Catholic Church. He 
married Catherine, born in county Galway, Ireland, in 1823, died July 17, 
1870, daughter of Patrick and Catherine (Tireman) Gilligan, both of whom 
lived and died in county Galway. Ireland. Children of John and Catherine 
(Gilligan) McCague: i. Sarah, married Owen Morgan, deceased, and re- 
sided for a time in Pittsburgh ; she is now a resident of Brownsville avenue, 
of that city. 2. Mary, married John Snee, a farmer and contractor, and 
lives in Springfield, Ohio. 3. Elizabeth, unmarried, lives in Springfield, 
Ohio, with her sister, Mary. 4. Edward, died in England, aged sixteen 
years. 5. John, of whom further. 6. James J., of whom further. 7. Patrick, 
died in infancy. 8. Margaret, died in infancy. 

(V) John (3) McCague, son of John (2) and Catherine (Gilligan) 
McCague, was born in Yorkshire. England, obtaining his education in the 
parochial school of that place, at an early age beginning work in the iron 
and steel mills in the vicinity of his home. For twelve years he was employed 
by the Charles Campbell Company, of Sheffield, in the plant at Pennystone. 
In 1886 he immigrated to the United States, and upon coming to Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, was for six months employed by the Oliver Steel Company, 
in the fall of 1886 locating at Homestead, Pennsylvania, and beginning a 
connection with the Carnegie Steel Company that endures to the present 
time. Mr. McCague's home is at No. 614 Twelfth avenue. Munhall, Penn- 
sylvania. He belongs to St. Mary IVIagdalene Roman Catholic Church, of 



8i6 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 



Homestead. He married, June 29, 1879, Mary, born in Yorkshire, England, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Fuery) Callahan, both of Irish descent, her 
father having for many years been in both the British army and naval service. 

(V) James J. McCague, son of John (2) and Catherine (Gilligan) Mc- 
Cague, was born in Rotherham, Yorkshire, England, and was there educated 
in the parochial school. He immigrated to the United States in 1884, set- 
tling in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he was employed; later moved to 
Homestead, Pennsylvania, remaining in the employ of the same company 
in various capacities and was thus engaged until 1901. He is a member of 
the St. Mary Magdalene Roman Catholic Church, of Homestead, and affili- 
ates with the Catholic Mutual Beneficial Association and the Ancient Order 
of Hibernians. 

Mr. McCague married, February 3, 1891, Bridget, born in county Gal- 
way, Ireland, daughter of John and Bridget Joyce. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. McCague: John F., Catherine, Raymond, Mary, Margaret, Dorothy, 
Irene, Grace, Edward, and James, died aged eight years. 



This name was formerly spelled Earner, but just when the 
LEARN change in form was made is not known. The family came 
from Holland to the north of England, from which country 
they came to America. They were among the very earliest settlers of West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Learn, and a brother, came from Philadelphia about 1750 and 
settled at a place now called Tannersville, in Monroe county, Pennsylvania. 
He purchased a large tract of land, and his house was located on the present 
site of Brown's Hotel. His children were: i. George, of further mention. 
2. Mary, born January 14, 1753. 3. Rachel, born August 22, 1754. 4. John, 
born May 17, 1756, remained in Monroe county until 1823, when he re- 
moved to Cattaraugus county, New York, to join his sons who had preceded 
him to that section, and his descendants are still residents of that county. 
5. Jacob, born July 11, 1758, remained in Monroe county, where some of his 
descendants still reside, while others have gone to western states. 6. Cath- 
erine, born June 20, 1760. 7. Rebecca, born July 24, 1763. 8. Andrew, of 
further mention. 9. Peter, born February 8. 1767, with his sisters, settled 
in the Province of Ontario, Canada, and he there became a captain in the 
British army, and served during the War of 1812; in 1814 he was shot 
while on his horse, the evident purpose being robbery ; his descendants may 
be found from Toronto to Alberta, while a few are now living in the United 
States. 10. Carey, born September 22, 1769. 

(II) George Learn, the eldest child of John Learn, was born January 
26, 1751, and was massacred by the Indians, July 3, 1781. He had built a 
house about a quarter of a mile distant from that of his father, and there 
he lived with his wife and two children. At the time of the massacre, his 
little son, John, was taken by an aunt, who escaped with him to the shelter 
of some bushes, where they remained concealed. A little dog followed them 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 817 

from the house, and in order not to be betrayed by him, the aunt muffled 
his head in an apron she wore. The child lived to raise a large family and 
many of his descendants live in and around Ithaca and Geneva, New York. 
Prior to and during the Revolution a boat path led from Stroudsburg to 
Tannersville, along the banks of the Pocono Creek. Some time after the set- 
tlement of the Earner or Learn family at this point, a settler, while following 
this path, discovered the tracks of Indians about two miles away, and upon 
reaching Tannersville at once informed the family of John Earner, so that 
they might guard against a sudden attack of the red men. On the followmg 
day George Learn repaired to a field adjoining his home, and was engaged in 
mowing, when a band of Indians approached and placing themselves bet- 
tween their victim and his house, fired and wounded him. Securing a fence 
rail he then defended himself with great bravery, but was finally overpow- 
ered and killed while attempting to reach the house of his father. After 
scalping him they went to his house, secured his wife and child and carried 
them to the Pocono Mountains. The settlers started in pursuit as soon as 
they became aware of the facts, and when they reached the mountains they 
found the body of the child, which had been scalped. Not far ofif lay the 
mother, who had been butchered in the most inhuman fashion, portions of her 
body being suspended from nearby trees. John Learn, the father, heard the 
firing and approached to learn the cause, and upon seeing an Indian he fired 
upon him. This proved a fatal shot for himself, as it disclosed his presence 
and insured his speedy death. It is supposed that he killed the Indian at 
whom he fired, as a cap with a buckshot hole in it was found at the spot, but 
the body of the Indian had been removed by his companions. 

(II) Andrew Learn, son of John Learn or Earner, was born November 
30, 1764. After the massacre he removed to Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, settling near Salina, on a farm now owned by John and Urias Learn, 
his grandsons. He married Susan Yockey, and had children: i. John, born 
in 1785, died in 1858; he moved to the vicinity of Apollo in 1820, to Indiana 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and there his death occurred; he married 
Elizabeth Ashbaugh, and they had eight sons and four daughters who grew 
to maturity, and all raised families. 2. Catherine, married George \\'anga- 
man. 3. Elizabeth, married George Best. 4. Mary, married John Ashbaugh. 
5. Susan, married Barnabas Blose. 6. George, married Elizabeth Piper, and 
had children : John, who lives on a part of the old homestead ; George, of 
Rifle, Colorado, was born December 10, 1853 • Sarah, married Win Moore, 
deceased ; Andrew, deceased, lived in Homestead ; Rachel, married Simon 
Smail ; Caroline, married James Alcorn ; Susan, married Jacob Busch ; Eliza- 
beth, married Simon Bowman, of Greensburg. 7. Sarah, married Charles 
Weinel. 8. Barbara, married Hamilton Morton. 9. Rachel, married Jacob 
Bash. 10. Andrew, of further mention. 

(III) Andrew (2) Learn, son of Andrew (i) and Elizabeth (Ash- 
baugh) Learn, was born about 1805, died about 1876. He married Fanny 
Piper, born in 1812, died October 12, 1895. She was descended from a 



8i8 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

pioneer family of Saltsburg, Pennsylvania, and had a brother, Joseph Piper, 
who died at the age of ninety-nine years, and who had been at the time of 
his death, and for many years prior to that time, the mail carrier between 
Indiana and the town of Saltsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Learn were the parents 
of children: i. Jacob P., bom in 1834, died in 1890; he was a successful 
merchant of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he was the proprietor of the 
first large department store in the town; married Rachel King; children: 
Dewitt and Albert; wife and children are also deceased. 2. Susan, born in 
1836, married Sanford Clawson, deceased; she lives in Avonmore, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Margaret J., born August 31, 1838, married Frank Wolford, de- 
ceased. 4. Urias M., born in 1841, lives on a part of the old Learn home- 
stead near Salina; he has children: Elsie (Glass), Ida, Alice. 5. Andrew 
Carpenter,- of further mention. 6. Mary Catharine, born April 17, 1847, 
lives with her sister, Mrs. Wolford. 7. Albert, born in 1852, died 
January 15, 1909; was a traveling salesman and oil operator; married 
Electa James; children: Gordon, deceased, and Harold, married Margaret 
Kirk. Andrew Learn was a member of the German Reformed Church. 

(IV) Andrew Carpenter Learn, son of Andrew (2) and Fannie (Piper) 
Learn, was born at Meadowbrook Farm, Bell township, Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1845, died December 29, 191 1, at the 
home of his son, Harry James Learn, at No. 212 Camp avenue, Braddock, 
Pennsylvania. His early years were passed on the farm, and when a young 
lad he was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade. At the age of eigh- 
teen years he was one of the first to join in the rush to the oil fields at Oil 
City and Titusville, Pennsylvania, and there he became a tool dresser, and 
later an oil operator, by these means realizing a fortune. He then returned 
to Pittsburgh, and then established himself on an extensive scale as a black- 
smith and wagon builder in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, where he was identi- 
fied with this enterprise for about twenty years. He then sold his business 
and removed to Braddock, Pennsylvania, where he took charge of the black- 
smith department in the Carnegie Steel Works, a position he filled until six 
years before his death, when he retired to private life. He and his wife were 
members of the First Presbyterian Church. Mr. Learn married, November 
7, 1867, Anna Courson, born in New York City, in 1849, and left an orphan 
at a very early age. Her family name was Donahue, but she was adopted 
by a Mrs. Courson, who gave her her own name, and raised her in the 
Protestant faith. She had an only sister, Hannah, who was adopted by a 
family named Franey, and raised in the Catholic faith ; she married George 
Sixsmith, a baker, and lives at No. 306 Amity avenue. Homestead, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Learn had children: i. Harry James, of further men- 
tion. 2. Fannie May, died at the age of six years. 3. Margaret Edna, mar- 
ried John L. Colmery ; lives in Salem, Ohio, where he is engaged in the real 
estate business. 4. Andrew Franklin, a clerk in the store of his brother, 
lives in Braddock; married Alice Shaffer; one child, Elmyra. 

(V) Harry James Learn, son of Andrew Carpenter and Anna (Cour- 



son 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 819 

) Learn, was born at McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber, 16, 1868. His education was acquired in the Market street schools, 
in his native town, and he was graduated from thence at the age of seven- 
teen years, and since that time has been actively identified with business 
interests. He commenced as a clerk in the store of his uncle, J. P. Learn, 
who owned a large establishment in McKeesport, remaining there several 
years. During the next few years he was a clerk for several concerns, and 
in 1893 he established himself in the wall paper business at No. 873 Brad- 
dock avenue, Braddock, Pennsylvania. The following year he added a large 
stock of dry goods and these stocks are still the staples in which he deals, 
but on a greatly enlarged scale. The twenty odd years which have passed 
since he first established himself have made a wonderful change. He now 
has a magnificent store, with a stock worth upward of twenty-eight thousand 
dollars, and by his clean business methods, which have been combined with 
the necessary amount of progressiveness, he has built up an exceptionally 
fine trade. In 1900 he removed to No. 716 Braddock avenue, and this store 
was destroyed by fire in November, 1907. Mr. Learn at once had another 
fine brick building erected, and in November, 1908, took possession of the 
new place, which is equipped with everything that is to be found in an up- 
to-date establishment. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the 
First Presbyterian Church, which he has served as trustee three years. 
Among other business enterprises with which he is connected is the State 
Bank of Braddock, of which he is a director. His fraternal affiliation is as 
follows: Braddock Fields Lodge, No. 510, Free and Accepted Masons; Shi- 
loh Chapter, No. 257, Royal Arch Masons ; Lancard Commandery, Knights 
Templar ; Pennsylvania Consistory, Scottish Rite ; Syria Temple, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, having been a member of the 
Arab Patrol of this for fifteen years ; Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and Royal Arcanum, both of Braddock, and Valetta Commandery, 
Knights of Malta. 

Mr. Learn married, June 19, 1894, Jessie Pershing, born at Wellsburg, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of Hvigh H. and Elizabeth (Robertson) Pershing, 
both now deceased, the former of whom was a Methodist Episcopal preacher, 
and a veteran of the Civil War. Mrs. Learn died May 29, 1899. ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Learn had children: Annie Elizabeth, born May 16, 1896. a graduate 
in the Braddock High School, class 1914, and a member of class 1918 Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; Ralph Stanley, born February 7, 1898, attends the 
Braddock High School, and is a member of the class of 1918. 



This branch of the Lawson family of Allegheny county, 
LAWSON Pennsylvania, springs from James Lawson, born in Ireland, 

who when a young man, settled in Pittsburgh. After work- 
ing in the city as a turner, he bought a farm of one hundred acres, in Mc- 
Candless township, upon which he resided until death. He married Mary 
A. Nixon. Children: i. Annice, married Oliver Powers. 2. Tames N., mar- 



820 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

ried (first) Fannie Osbum, (second) Miss Fleming. 3. George A., of whom 
further. 

George A. Lawson was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 24, 
1848. He attended public schools and remained at the home farm until 
starting in for himself on the farm of fifty-seven and ai half acres, he now 
owns in McCandless township, near Wildwood. He has improved his farm 
with buildings and orchards and has there passed a quiet life of prosperity. 
He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
Mr. Lawson married, March i, 1870, Margaret Sample, born in McCandless 
township, September 12, 1850, daughter of James and Jane (Ross) Sample. 
Children: i. James, born December 25, 1870, deceased. 2. John S., born 
June 8, 1872, married Matilda Miller; children: Raymond and Mary. 3. 
Walker, born July 16, 1874, deceased. 4. William Charles, born March 7, 
1876, married Mary Wike, has a daughter, Beulah, resides in Beaver county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Mary, born October 31, 1877, married George Miller, and 
has children: Ralph, Viola, Marie. 6. Elmer George, born December 28, 
1881, married Edna Mahaffey, and has children: Norman, Hazel, Pearl. 7. 
Edward E., born November 29, 1885, resides at home unmarried. 8. Robert 
T., born June 14, 1887, resides at Homestead, Pennsylvania, unmarried. 



This account takes up the American record of the family to 
GRAHAM which Robert Fleming Graham, of McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania, belongs, beginning with Hugh Graham, of Scotch de- 
scent, a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. In his youth he underwent 
the thrilling experience of capture by Indians, making his escape from the 
camp of the savages and returning to his home in Lancaster county, where 
he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He married Mar- 
garet Kennedy, and among his sons were Robert, of whom further, John, 
George. The last two named were soldiers in a Pennsylvania regiment dur- 
ing the war of the Revolution, George at one time held prisoner by the 
enemy. He later settled in South Carolina, John made his home at New 
Albany, Indiana, which town he surveyed and laid out, numerous of his 
descendants there residing at the present time. 

(II) Robert Graham, son of Hugh and Margaret (Kennedy) Graham, 
was born about 1760, and was reared to manhood in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. Until 1800 he was a farmer, cultivating land in Lancaster county, 
in that year moving to Butler county, Pennsylvania, where he conducted 
a tannery and traded extensively with the Indians. • He was a soldier 
in the "Dunny Money" Volunteers in the second war with Great 
Britain, and after the close of the war moved to Elizabeth township, 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. Here he joined his father-in-law, 
Colonel Thomas Gilchrist, who had won his military title in the war for in- 
dependence and who had been granted a considerable tract of land, approx- 
imately five hundred acres, by a grateful government. Robert Graham was 
a Whig in political inclination, and with his wife belonged to the Associate 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 821 

Reformed Church. He died in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1840. He married Margaret Gilchrist, who died in 1839, and 
had six children, of whom John K. was the youngest. 

(III) John K. Graham, son of Robert and Margaret (Gilchristj 
Graham, was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 181 5, died in 1907. He 
grew to maturity in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there inherited 
a portion of the homestead, upon which he lived the greater part of his life. 
The buildings of the estate were remodeled at his direction and he was at one 
time a farmer upon an extensive scale, later disposing of a part of his 
property. His early political party was the Whig, and he at one time held 
the office of elder in the Associate Reformed Church, subsequently transferr- 
ing his religious allegiance to the United Presbyterian Church, of which he 
was also an elder. He married (first) Mary Ann Calhoun, who died about 
1852, daughter of John and Margaret (Calhoun) Calhoun; (second) Eliza 
Rankin. Children of John and Margaret (Calhoun) Calhoun: i. Adly, a 
minister of the Presbyterian Church, died aged twenty-seven years. 2. Mary 
Ann, of previous mention, married John K. Graham. 3. John, a farmer, died 
young. 4. Nancy, married Thomas Rankin, and died in Elizabeth township, 
Allegheny county^ Pennsylvania. 5. James, owner of a saw-mill, died aged 
forty-five years. 6. Thomas, a mill-worker, died in McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania. 7. Moses, a farmer, died in Washington county, Pennsylvania. 8. 
Alexander, a farmer, died in Lincoln township, Allegheny county, Pennsyl- 
vania. By his first marriage John K. Graham was the father of three chil- 
dren : John Calhoun, of whom further ; Adly and Robert, who both died in 
childhood. Children by his marriage to Eliza Rankin: Samuel A., lives on 
part of the Rankin homestead in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania ; Sarah J., 
married John O. Penny, and also lives on a part of the Rankin homestead in 
Elizabeth township, Allegheny county ; Mary Ann, died in childhood ; Eliza 
M., died in childhood ; Margaret C, died aged twenty-two years. 

(IV) John Calhoun Graham, son of John K. and Mary Ann (Calhoun) 
Graham, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in October, 1845, died 
in 1884. As a boy he attended the local schools, growing to manhood in the 
county of his birth, and after his marriage made his home on a section of 
the homestead in Elizabeth township. Here he resided until 1874, when he 
moved to Connellsville, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, there becoming the 
owner of a flouring mill, operating at different times on both banks of the 
Youghiogheny river and there remaining until his death. He was a Repub- 
lican in political action, and was with his wife a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church. He was a man of lofty principles, his well-ordered life 
beyond reproach of man, and was early called from ways of well-doing. He 
married Margaret Fleming, born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 
August, 1846, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Jack) Fleming. His 
widow now resides in Elyria, Ohio. Robert Fleming w^as a son of Robert 
Fleming, a native, of Ireland, of Scotch ancestry, who came to the United 
States prior to 1820, settling in East Deer township, Allegheny county, Penn- 



822 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

sylvania. He gained title to a farm in this locality and there spent his re- 
maining years. Robert Fleming, son of Robert Fleming, was born on this 
farm, inheriting a portion thereof at his father's death, and there living all 
of his life. He and his wife were first members of the Associate Reformed 
Church, later of the United Presbyterian Church. By his marriage with 
Elizabeth Jack he was the father of : i. Sarah, married William Hill: died on 
the old homestead. 2. Annie, married WiUiam McDowell ; died in New- 
castle, Pennsylvania. 3. Margaret, of previous mention, married John Cal- 
houn Graham. 4. Cynthia Mary, married J. P. Henderson, deceased, and 
resides in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 5. Annetta, deceased ; married Rev. 
J. P. Gibson, of Tarkio, Missouri. Children of John Calhoun and Margaret 
(Fleming) Graham: i. Robert Fleming, of whom further. 2. William C, 
principal of the High School at Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 3. Mary C, 
died unmarried, September 16, 1897. 4. James B., chief inspector of the 
National Tube Company, of Loraine, Ohio, and lives in Elyria, Ohio. 

(V) Robert Fleming Graham, son of John Calhoun and Margaret 
(Fleming) Graham, was born in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, May 19. 1871. He was educated in the public schools, in 
Mount Pleasant Academy preparing himself for entrance at Tarkio College, 
Missouri, whence he was graduated in 1894. Returning to the state of his 
birth he was for nine years a school teacher in Mount Pleasant, McKeesport, 
and Pittsburgh, then registering as a student at law in the office of James H. 
Beal. In March, 1902, Mr. Graham was admitted to the bar, and has since 
attended the needs of a general practice, being attorney for the McKeesport 
school district and several corporations having their seat in that locality. 
He is a member of the Allegheny County Bar Association, and holds posi- 
tion as an advocate of reputation, integrity and ability, a place the right to 
which he has strongly defended in legal contest with his professional breth- 
ren. He is a member of Lodge, Chapter and Commandery in the Masonic 
Order. 

Mr. Graham married, in June, 1904, Mary E., daughter of Peter and 
Mary { Rae) Patterson, and has children: i. Robert Patterson, born March 
5, 1906, died aged five years. 2. John Kenneth, born August 6, 1908. 



The Kretzer family, of which Charles H. Kretzer, of Allison 
KRETZER Park, Pennsylvania, is representative, were originally seated 
in England, but in 1812 Christian Kretzer emigrated to 
Hanover, a province of Prussia since 1866, but from 1814 until that date 
a kingdom created by the Congress of Vienna in 1814, and prior to that 
date an independent duchy and the seat of the House of Hanover, from 
whence came George I., who established the Hanoverian dynastv in Eng- 
land, in 1 714. From him descended Victoria, for many years England's 
honored queen. In 1866, Hanover espoused the Austrian side in the war 
with Prussia, in consequence the Prussians dethroned the King of Hanover 
and annexed the countrv. Nicholas Kretzer settled at Einbeck, on the Tim 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 823 

river, thirty-nine miles from Hanover, the capital of the province, and there 
lived until his death. 

(II) Christian (2) Kretzer, son of Christian (1 ) Kretzer, was born in 
Iber by Einbeck, Hanover, Prussia, and there died in 1858. He was a well 
educated man, a tailor by trade, and a Lutheran in religion, about three- 
fourths of the population of Hanover being of the Protestant faith. He 
married Justina Zisake. Children: 1. Augustus John, came to the United 
States and died in Baltimore, Maryland. 2. Christian (3), resides in Ger- 
many. 3. Henry, came to the United States, married Catherine Viemiller, 
and resides in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 4. Hannah, came to the 
United States, married Frederick Moehler, and resides in Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Frederick. 6. George, died unmarried, aged twenty-three 
years. 7. Charles H., of further mention. Five other children died young. 

(III) Charles H. Kretzer, son of Christian (2) and Justina (Ziesake) 
Kretzer, was born at Einbeck, Hanover, Prussia, August 16, 1849. He was 
well educated in excellent German schools, learned the trade of tailor, and 
followed that occupation until May 3, 1867, when he came to the United 
States, locating in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he began working 
on a farm at a wage of ten dollars monthly. He had brought his widowed 
mother with him and from his scanty wages supported her also. He con- 
tinued as a farm hand for about four years, then rented a farm in Mc- 
Candless township and continued a tenant farmer for seven years. In 1878 
he had accumulated some capital, which he invested in a farm of sixty acres. 
He sold twenty acres of this for a sum sufficient to pay one-third of the 
original price of the sixty acres and as he prospered bought back the twenty 
acres with forty additional, making his farm an even one hundred acres, on 
which he raised general crops, fruits and market produce, also conducting 
until 1909 a dairy. He has improved his farm by erection of good build- 
ings, brought the land to a high state of fertility and now has an estate, 
created entirely by his own efforts, of which he may well be proud. He is 
a Republican in politics, has served as collector of taxes for McCandless 
township and is the present health officer. He is a highly respected citizen 
and has won a high place in public regard as well as a competence, starting 
with nothing, a stranger in a strange land. 

Mr. Kretzer married (first) in 1873, Magdalena Weaver, born June 11, 
1857, daughter of Jacob and Anna (Jacob) Weaver. He married (second) 
Justina Weaver, sister of his first wife. Jacob Weaver, their father, was 
a Union soldier, killed at the battle of Gettysburg. Child of first wife : Henry 
S., married Louise Hart ; children : Arthur, Carrie. Dorothy. Children by 
second wife: i. Anna, married James Davies ; children: Milton, Wilbert, and 
a daughter. 2. George J., unmarried, resides in British Columbia. . 3. Fred- 
erick C, married Isabel Smith ; children : Mildred, Howard, Edna. 4. John 
G., married Faith Warden, and has a daughter, Estelle. 5. Charles E.. un- 
married, resides at British Columbia. 6. Raymond Weaver, at home. 7. 
Elmer William,- at home. 



824 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

The descendants of Samuel Hopper, the immigrant ancestor 
HOPPER of his line, have been resident mainly in Allegheny and 
Washington counties, the lives of those chronicled below hav- 
ing been lived in the former locality. 

(I) Samuel Hopper v^ras born in the north of Ireland in December, 
1784, died near Oakdale, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, February 27, 1875. 
When he was a lad of sixteen years he came to the United States, and 
after his marriage in this country settled in South Fayette township, Alle- 
gheny county, two and one-half miles from Oakdale, Pennsylvania. His 
property was no better than wilderness at his time of purchase, but he set 
himself determinedly to the task of converting it into desirable farm land, an 
object that he accomplished successfully. The log house that he built from 
the trees that he felled is still standing, greatly decayed but yet in an upright 
position, the storms of a century having failed to end its existence. He 
married, November 18, 181 1, Elizabeth Barclay, born in August, 1784, died 
January 28, 1869, who, with him, is buried in Robinson Run Cemetery. Both 
were members of the United Presbyterian Church, regular in their attends 
ance, devoted in their worship. They were the parents of : i. Robert, born 
in 1812. 2. Andrew Barclay, born in 1813. 3. Samuel, of whom further. 
4. Arthur Jamison, born in 1816. 5. Nancy, born in 1818, married Alex- 
ander Fitch, and died in Ohio. 6. John, born in 1820. 7. Elizabeth, born 
in 1822, married Thomas Campbell. 8. Mary Ann, born in 1824, married 
James Wallace. 9. James, died in 1826. 

(II) Samuel (2) Hopper, son of Samuel (i) and Elizabeth (Barclay) 
Hopper, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 181 5, died in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. In manhood he became an engineer, his service being on the 
river-boats, as he was employed at his death. The vessel of which he was 
engineer ran to Cincinnati, and in 1849-50, after making this city on one of 
his frequent trips, he was stricken with cholera, death resulting soon after, 
and he was there buried. He married Margaret McClelland, who survived 
him, after his death married John Marshall, living in Elliottsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, until her death. Children of Samuel (2) and Margaret (McClelland) 
Plopper: i. Melinda, married a Mr. Stewart, and died at Elliottsville, Penn- 
sylvania. 2. William James, of whom further. 3. Samuel, met an accidental 
death in Texas. Children of the second marriage of Margaret (McClelland) 
Hopper, that with John Marshall: i. Annie, married George Holton, and 
resides in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 2. Theodore, lives in Pittsburgh. 3. 
Joseph, deceased. 4. Jared, lives in the Philippine Islands. 

(HI) William James Hopper, son of Samuel (2) and Margaret (Mc- 
Clelland) Hopper, was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. After ob- 
taining a public school education, he mastered the machinist's trade. He was 
actively engaged at his trade for several years, in 1903 moving to Crafton, 
Pennsylvania, where he established in the plumbing business, in which he 
remained until his death on December 11, 1904. He had prospered in his 
line and had invested in real estate, at his death owning three houses that 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 825 

had been erected at his direction. During the Civil War he served two en- 
hstments in the Fourteenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
one of nine months, the other of one year, and while in the Union service 
contracted rheumatism, from which he sufifered to the end of his life. His 
political party was the Republican. 

Mr. Hopper married, August 7, 1873, Mary Melissa, daughter of 
Samuel and Mary (Lorraine) Ewing. Both of her parents were natives of 
Oakdale, Pennsylvania, where they were married and where they died, both 
buried in the Union Cemetery. He was a farmer by occupation, on one 
occasion spending three years in California, where he was engaged in lumber 
dealing. Children of William James and Mary Melissa (Ewing) Hopper: i. 
Margaret, married John W. Taylor, Jr., and lives in Crafton, Pennsylvania, 
the mother of two children, John and Eileen. 2. Samuel Ewing, a plumber 
of Crafton, Pennsylvania, married Hannah Evans, and has children : Ewing, 
Armede, Laura. 



The name of Hugo is known far and wide in the state of Penn- 
HUGO sylvania, as connected with the conduct of hotels of a high stand- 
ard. The family came to this country from Germany, and 
brought with them those qualities of thrift and industry so characteristic of 
Germans. 

(I) John Hugo was born in Germany and came to America unmarried. 
He made his home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he retired from busi- 
ness late in life, and died in August, 1885. He married Mary Elsessor, and 
had children : One died in infancy ; Jacob, of further mention ; John and 
Michael, retired hotel proprietors, reside in McKeesport ; Elizabeth, married 
Joseph Gush, and lives on a farm near McKeesport ; Mary, married Peter 
Cassidy, and lives in McKeesport ; Annie, married Lawrence Clifford, and 
lives in Pittsburgh. 

(H) Jacob Hugo, son of John and Mary (Elsessor) Hugo, was born in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1850. His education was acquired in 
the public schools of Pittsburgh, and he then entered upon his business 
career. For a time he was in partnership with his brother John as proprietors 
of the hotel now conducted by Mr. Fisher, and upon the death of John, Jacob 
Hugo was the sole proprietor, and conducted it alone until his death, January 
21, 1896. He was well known and very popular personally, and his death 
was deeply regretted by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. He was 
a man of many-sided business ability, and was one of the organizers and a 
director of the local street car railway, and of the Thirteenth Street Bridge, a 
toll bridge. His political support was given to the Democratic partv, and 
he and his wife were members of St. Peter's Catholic Church. 

'Mr. Hugo married (first) Carrie Abrahams, a native of Wales. He 
married (second) December 29, 1884, Sarah McDermott, born in county 
Durham, England, a daughter of Bart and Sarah (Murphy) McDermott, the 
former a Catholic,- the latter a Protestant. They came to America in 1874. 



826 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

settling at Houtzdale, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, and came to McKees- 
port in 1887. He was a miner by occupation, and retired from active work 
when he was seventy- four years of age. He and his wife have celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary, and have had children: Thomas, a time- 
keeper; Sarah, who married Mr. Hugo; Jane; Hugh, a merchant of Mc- 
Keesport, who died in 1912; Joseph, living retired at McKeesport ; John, a 
barber of McKeesport. By his first marriage Mr. Hugo had children: 
Maggie, married John Crawford, lives in Point Marion; Cecelia, married 
a Mr. Wetzel; Clara, died in infancy; Agnes, married Dennis Downe, Hvcs 
in Charleroi, Pennsylvania ; Lawrence, engaged in the real estate business in 
McKeesport. By the second marriage he had: Hilda; Victor, a draftsman; 
Mary. 



When William HL, of England, distributed honors among his 
GIBSON soldiers after the historic battle of the Boyne, one of those 

raised to knighthood was an ancestor of Robert M. Gibson, of 
Gibsonia, Pennsylvania. To this family belonged Thomas Gibson, a native 
of Ireland, who accompanied his mother to this country when a lad of twelve 
years, locating in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where he 
passed his entire life. His calling was that of a farmer. He married Rachel 
Dickson, born in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, daughter 
of Jacob Dickson. Jacob Dickson, in whose veins flowed the blood of the 
Delaware Indian tribe, was a soldier in the American army, at one time 
serving as aide-de-camp to General Washington. He enlisted from Alle- 
gheny county, and was the only Pennsylvania pensioner from that county, 
receiving for his military service fifty acres of land in Allegheny county, 
which he afterwards exchanged in a trade for a tract of two hundred acres 
in Pine township, the same county, near Wexford, there conducting farming 
operations. Children : Eliza, Margaret E., Nancy, Mary Jane, Rachel, James 
D., Charles, of whom further. 

(II) Charles Gibson, son of Thomas and Rachel (Dickson) Gibson, 
was born in Pine township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. His education 
was obtained in the subscription schools, and early in life he learned the 
trade of carpenter, his calling until he took up milling and farming. Charles 
Gibson was at one time the owner of sixteen hundred acres of land, of which 
the farm of two hundred and twenty-five acres in Richland township, oc- 
cupied by his son, Robert M., is a part, and he made hay and grain his prin- 
cipal crops. At this place he also operated a flouring mill for many years, 
and was well-known and regarded throughout the neighborhood. When the 
tracks of the Pittsburgh & Western Railroad were laid he financed the opera- 
tion to a great extent, and for a time headed the organization of this road 
as president. He was a man of local prominence, serving as postmaster for 
about nine years, and filling a position on the school board. He married 
Elizabeth Jane Logue, whose mother was a member of the Dickson family, 
belonging to the branch claiming General George Gibson, who met his death in 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 827 

battle in the war for independence, serving at the time under Cieneral Arthur 
St. Clair. Children of Charles and Elizabeth Jane (Loguej Gibson: Janetta, 
Thomas E., Robert M., of whom further mention, Louisa B., Rachel D. 

(Ill) Robert M. Gibson, son of Charles and Elizabeth Jane (Logue) 
Gibson, was born in the house that is his present home in Richland town- 
ship, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 11, 1845. His early studies 
were pursued in the schools of the locality, and he was for three years a 
student in Jefferson College, entering business life immediately after leaving 
this institution and becoming connected with the construction of the Pitts- 
burgh & Western Railroad, a project in which his father was heavily 
interested. Upon its completion and the beginning of business thereon, Mr. 
Gibson became freight and passenger agent at Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, 
later opening a general mercantile establishment in Gibsonia which he 
maintained for many years, drawing upon the surrounding country-side 
for his patronage and building up a trade of unusually large dimensions. 
For three years he was engaged in the same line at Bakerstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and upon his return to Gibsonia he continued as a merchant for four 
years thereafter. Mr. Gibson has been especially active in the promotion 
of enterprises affecting the region in which he lives, and was the chief 
organizer of the Northern Pittsburgh Telephone Company, of which he 
was for several years president and general manager, and was also president 
of the Allegheny & Butler Plank Road Company. The Butler Short Line 
received his support at the time of its organization, and any movement, what- 
ever its magnitude, that promises the welfare and improvement of the 
condition of the body of the people receives his enthusiastic backing. Under 
the administration of President William McKinley Mr. Gibson was ap- 
pointed postmaster of the town bearing his name, Gibsonia, and served 
until July i, 1914, when his resignation took effect, his daughter, Nancy 
Owens, being appointed to fill the vacancy thus caused. With his family he 
is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and subscribed one-third of the 
cost of erection of a church of this denomination in Gibsonia. He is a 
citizen of worthy parts, wholly public-spirited, and is content to contribute 
his efforts for the general good in a manner quiet and unostentatious. 
Honor, integrity and a correct use of the material prosperity that has come 
to him have gained him a leading position in the community, the responsi- 
bilities of which he has accepted and ably discharges. 

Mr. Gibson married (first) Mary A. Dunlap, (second) Anna M. Owens. 
By his first marriage he is the father of : Charles E. and Margaret. By his 
second: EHzabeth Logue and Nancy Owens, who succeeded her father as 
postmaster of Gibsonia, Pennsylvania. 



Herman Joseph Myers is a member of an old German family 
MYERS typical of the best character of that strong and dominant race 

which has contributed so large and valuable an element to the 
make-up of our composite American citizenship, an element which has served 
as a leaven of its own peculiar virtues of industry and unswerving pursuit 
of an objective, in that same citizenship. 



828 WESTERN PENxNSYLVANIA 

(I) Peter Myers, grandfather of Herman Joseph Myers, was a native 
of Germany, and passed his childhood and youth in that country. His birth 
occurred in 1802, and it was not until 1842, forty years later, that he left his 
native land. He had by that time married and was the father of a number 
of children, the eldest of whom was twelve years of age. The age was a 
troublous one for the energetic and enterprising young German, whose 
heart was set upon carving out a name for himself, for the aristocracy so 
long entrenched was making desperate efforts to control the strong demo- 
cratic movement which was threatening their privileges and power, and 
which culminated a few years later in the Revolution of 1848-49. There 
seemed but one possibility for the German of democratic beliefs and feel- 
ings, but one way for him to escape the oppression of the ruling classes, or 
the still worse predicament of enlistment in the army and the necessity of 
aiding in the establishment of the very yoke so galling to themselves and 
their loved ones. This one way was no other than to leave the beloved 
"Fatherland" and seek one's fortune elsewhere. It was this sad necessity 
which caused such a tremendous wave of emigration from Germany at that 
time, a wave which, followed by others not less large, has broken on the 
shores of the New World and brought to the United States a splendid set 
of citizens including such men as Carl Schurz and the Heckers. With this 
great movement came Peter Myers with his wife and family, at the age of 
forty years, to win his life anew in the new land. Upon his arrival in 
this country, he went directly to the Pennsylvania coal fields, and settled in 
the city of McKeesport, Allegheny county. Here he quickly found employ- 
ment as a coal miner, in which occupation he continued for the remainder 
of his long life, or until he retired from active work altogether. His death 
occurred in 1890 at the age of eighty-eight years. His marriage had 
occurred in Germany, and his wife accompanied him to the home in Pennsyl- 
vania, where she lived until 1899, and died at the venerable age of ninety-two 
years. To them were born six children, as follows : John, of whom further ; 
Jacob, Catherine, Ellen, Gertrude, Minnie, deceased. 

(H) John Myers, the eldest son of Peter and Catherine Myers, was 
born in Germany in the year 1830, and was twelve years of age when his 
parents emigrated to America and brought him with them. Children attend 
school early in the "Fatherland" and John Myers had gained most of his 
education before he left his native land, being a pupil in the local Volke- 
schule. Upon arriving in the new home, he found employment, as did his 
father, in the coal mines of the region. The mining which was done there 
at that time was of an exceedingly primitive type, the coal which the men 
excavated being hauled out by dogs. John Myers was a very clever youth, 
who kept his eyes open for opportunities, and added to this asset was a 
most commendable industry. It was not a great while, therefore, before he 
was able to save sufficient capital to enable him to open a small grocery 
business, which in course of time grew to large proportions. Besides this 
business Mr. Myers, who was active in Republican politics, was appointed 
postmaster of the town of Coultersville, Allegheny county, and held that 




yr^^^W^ 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 829 

position for sixteen years or until the lime of his death. Save for the some- 
what meager education which he had received in Germany, he had nothing 
in the nature of formal traininj^. He was, however, a great reader of books 
on his own account, and in this manner gained an excellent education, and 
was very broadly read. As above remarked, he was a Republican in politics, 
and took a keen interest in all the questions occupying the poHtical arena 
in his day, whether of national or local application. He was a devoted 
member of the Catholic Church, as was his wife, and their children were 
reared in that faith. He married Elizabeth Bost, also a native of Germany, 
born in the year 1833, daughter of William and Annie (Mavis) Bost, life- 
long residents of that country. Mr. and Mrs. Bost were the parents of 
seven children, as follows : Louis, Henry, Marie, Marian, Margaret, Cath- 
erine, Elizabeth, above mentioned. All these children, with the exception of 
Marian and Catherine are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. John Myers both 
died in the year 1905, on May 24 and July 23, respectively. To them were 
born twelve children, as follows : John, Gertrude, Louisa, Louis, Annie, 
Mary, Lizzy, deceased; Herman Joseph, of whom further; Frank, Catherine, 
Jacob and George, both deceased. 

(HI) Herman Joseph Myers, the eighth child of John and Elizabeth 
(Bost) Myers, was born March 9, 1871, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
His education was received at the town of Coultersville that county, of 
which his father was appointed postmaster when Herman J. was about ten 
years old, and which was the home of the family for more than fifty years 
altogether. He attended the Catholic parochial school and the local public 
schools there, and after completing his studies he obtained a position as 
clerk in the grocery establishment of W. J. Sharpies. He continued in this 
service for a period of ten years, when he received an appointment to a 
place in the county treasurer's office in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Here he 
remained for three years, and then again received a better appointment, this 
time as assistant postmaster of the city of McKeesport, an office which he 
held for the four-year term. He then accepted a position as bookkeeper 
for the concern of Bowman Brothers Company. In the meantime Mr. Myers 
had determined, when the occasion arose, to engage in business for himself, 
and with this end in view he plied himself with energy and zeal to his labors, 
living a frugal life the while, and was thus able to lay by a steadily increasing 
capital. His position with Bowman Brothers Company may thus be looked 
upon as merely a temporary expedient, in spite of the fact that it was five 
years before he felt justified in leaving them and embarking on his own 
adventure. It was in the autumn of 1908 that he finally made the move, and 
established the Myers Coal Company, with offices at Thirteenth and Market 
streets, McKeesport, which has ever since been the scene of his active and 
successful business career. The venture was never in doubt, and from the 
start the business has increased both rapidly and steadily, until in 19 13 the 
firm was incorporated under the name of the Myers Coal Company, with 
Mr. Myers as president and Henry Collin as secretary and treasurer. The 
business is now one of the most important in the city, and Mr. Myers has 



830 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

become one of the most prominent figures in the business and financial 
circles in the region. The company deals in coal and coke, fire brick and fire 
clay, lime, sewer pipe, cement and builders' supplies. 

Nor is this all. His interests are by no means confined, as in the case of 
so many of our successful business men, to the narrow limits of his personal 
affairs, but on the contrary embrace the general affairs of the community 
of which he is a member. This is especially the case in the matter of politics, 
in which he takes a deep and intelligent interest, and he is very active in 
the local councils of the Republican party, of which he is an ardent member. 
Mr. Myers has made his residence in the township of Versailles, Allegheny 
county, since his business has been in McKeesport, and it is in the former 
place that his political activities have lain. Here he is regarded as not only 
one of the most successful politicians of the neighborhood, but as possessing 
those fortunate characteristics which fit a man for a competent office holder. 
He has without doubt executive ability of no common order, his integrity is 
unimpeachable, and he has shown that courage necessary to resist undue 
political pressure without which no man can adequately serve the public in 
any official capacity. As a consequence of these qualities, Mr. Myers has 
held wellnigh all the posts of trust within the gift of the township. Among 
others he has occupied the position of treasurer, school director and clerk, 
besides being, as was his father before him, a delegate to the convention 
nominating Dalzelle, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Myers married, October 7, 1896, Clara B. Snyder, also a native of 
Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, born May 4, 1877. Mrs. Myers is a 
daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Lang) Snyder, of Versailles township, 
where he is a large property owner. Mr. and Mrs. Myers are the parents of 
four children, as follows : Thelma, born October 6, 1897, who despite her 
youth is a graduate from Duff's Business College, and is now employed as a 
stenographer by the United Real Estate Company of McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania; Harold, born December 28, 1903; Edward, born January 27, 1908; 
Herbert, born October 28, 1909. 

Mr. Myers is one of the most successful business men of McKeesport, 
a stockholder in the City Bank of that place, and a large owner of property 
both there and in Versailles township, among his valuable properties being 
his place of business at the corner of Thirteenth and Market streets. Mr. 
Myers and his wife are members of the Catholic Church, as his family has 
always been, and they are rearing their children in the same faith. 



Bavaria, the second state in size of the German Empire, is the 

GIEL locality whence came John (i) Giel, father of John (2) Giel, of 

Glenshaw, Pennsylvania. That has long been the family home 

and it was there that George Giel, grandfather of John (2) Giel, passed his 

entire life in the pursuit of farming. George Giel married and had children, 

one of his sons John, of whom further. 

(II) John Giel, son of George Giel, was born in Bavaria, Germany, and 
was there reared, in his youth attending the local schools and acquiring a 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 831 

good education. In his native land he was a farmer, operating upon his 
land a flour and saw mill, and in 1875 emigrated to the United States, settling 
in Brooklyn, New York, and there living, retired until his death. He mar- 
ried Margaretta Banzer, born in Bavaria, Germany, daughter of George 
Banzer, a farmer. George Banzer married a Miss Sherber, and after his 
death she married again, her second husband being George Dotterweich, a 
soldier under the first Napoleon, who marched with that commander in the 
historic advance upon Moscow. George Dotterweich passed seven years in 
France, and was a fluent master of the language of that land. John and 
Margaretta (Banzer) Giel had numerous children, of whom five are living 
at the present time. 

(Ill) John (2) Giel, son of John (i) and Margaretta (Banzer) Giel,' 
was born in Bavaria, Germany, July 25, 1853, and as a youth attended the 
schools of his native land. In the spring of 1872, when almost nineteen 
years of age, he emigrated to the United States, coming directly to Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where he was for one and one-half years employed on 
the railroad. At the end of that time he was offered service in the stove 
works owned by Alexander Bradley, and there remained for the ten years 
from 1873 to 1883. In 1883 he became the proprietor of a hotel at No. 1306 
Penn avenue, then moving to No. 4521 Butler street, and continuing in this 
line of business until 1904. In this year Mr. Giel bought a farm of one 
hundred and thirteen acres on the Saxonberg pike in Hampton township, 
Allegheny county, remodeling the buildings and subsequently selling six 
acres of his property to George Calvert. Here he has since been a farmer 
and gardener, his sons, Robert and John Jr., now having full charge of the 
agricultural operations. Mr. Giel is now causing the erection of a new house 
on his property, and after its completion will live retired from all business 
cares. He is a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, of Pine 
Creek, Pennsylvania. He has been consistently successful in his business 
dealings, and retires after a career in which hard work, persistently and in- 
telligently directed toward the heights of prosperity, have met with worthy 
rewards. 

He married, in 1876, Elizabeth Zuger, born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 
and has children: Josephine, Willibalt, George, John, Augusta, Robert, 
Elizabeth, Edmund, Florence, Zita, Gerald, Loretta, Joseph, Margaretta. 
Mr. and Mrs. Giel were also the parents of two children who are now de- 
ceased, Anthony and Edmund. 



The Browns herein noted came to Cumberland county. Penn- 
BROWN sylvania, from Ireland, thence to Allegheny county. The emi- 
grant, William Brown, after settling in Cumberland county, 
with his wife. Rebecca (Gracie) Brown, there always lived and reared a 
family, his fifth son, James, settling in Allegheny county. Children of 
William Brown: Thomas. William, Robert, David, James, Mar)'. The 
family were members of the United Presbyterian Church of Newville. 

(II) James Brown, son of William and Rebecca (Gracie) Brown, was 



832 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, May lo, 1824, died in Hampton 
township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1896. He was 
educated in public schools, and when a young man came from Cumberland 
county to Allegheny City, where he was a cattle drover. He also lived in 
Hazlewood in charge of a gentleman's estate, and in 1878 bought a farm in 
Hampton township on which he resided until his death. He was a member 
and a trustee of Hampton United Presbyterian Church, and a Republican in 
politics. He married Harriet A. Green, born July 20, 1839, died February 
28, 1906, daughter of William and Mary Ann (Ashton) Green. Children: 
I. Rebecca J., born January 31, i860, married Cameron Nevin. 2. Elizabeth, 
born January 12, 1862, married John Calvin Dickey. 3. William James, of 
further mention. 4. Carrie M., born February 7, 1871, married William E. 
Thomas. 5. Laura Olive, born May 30, 1879, married Eli P. Thomas. 6. 
Stella G., born August 26, 1884, married Torrance Rowe. 

(HI) William James Brown, son of James and Harriet A. (Green) 
Brown, was born in Alleg'heny City (Pittsburgh, North Side), Pennsylvania, 
March 3, 1864. He was educated in the city public schools and since leaving 
school has been continuously engaged in farming in Hampton township. In 
1894 he purchased his present farm of forty acres, on which he erected the 
present house and barn. He is a director of the Bakerstown Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, a member of Hampton United Presbyterian Church, 
and in political faith a Republican. Mr. Brown married, March 27. 1890, 
Mary Mclntyre, born September 23, 1867, daughter of Hercules and Chris- 
tianna (Sterling) Mclntyre, her father a blacksmith. Hercules Mclntyre 
was born May 10, 1842; Christianna Sterling was born November 13, 1843. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Mclntyre: i. Mary, above mentioned. 2. John, 
married Anna McCaslin. 3. Robert, unmarried. 4. Isabel, married Harry 
Keil. 5. James, died young. 6. George I., unmarried. 7. Ira M., unmarried. 
Children of William James and Mary (Mclntyre) Brown: i. Florence 
Mary, born October 5, 1891. 2. Olive I., born July 2. 1893. 3. Alice S., born 
June 16, 1895, died March 23, 1913. 4. James H., born December 26, 1898. 
5. Harriet A., born June 7, 1901. 6. Howard L., born May 25, 1907. 



Joseph Allen, born in 1809, in Bally nocken, county Down, 
ALLEN Ireland, came to the United States in 1846. He was a con- 
tractor of street work in Allegheny City, residing in that city 
until 1 861, when he removed to a farm of thirty-three acres in Ross town- 
ship, which he cultivated until his death in 1896. He married, soon after 
coming to this country, Eliza Musgrave, daughter of John Musgrave ; she 
was also born in county Down, and survived her husband until 1900. 
Joseph Allen and his wife were both members of the Reformed Presby- 
terian Church. Their children were : Mary E. and John M. 

John M. Allen, son of Joseph and Eliza (Musgrave) Allen, was bom 
in Allegheny City, July 6, 1849. He was educated in the public schools 
and Newell Davis Academy, Allegheny City, attending the latter school 
two years. He accompanied his parents to the Ross township farm on 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 833 

which he now resides. From 1865 until 1880 he Hved at West View on 
his farm, but in the fall of 1880 removed to Allegheny City, where he lived 
until 1907, then removed again to his present residence in Ross township. 
During his residence in Allegheny City he was variously employed until 
1882, in that year establishing in the retail coal business at the corner of 
Boquet and Grant avenues, that city, where he has continued actively 
engaged for thirty-two years. His present residence, to which he removed 
in 1907, is the homestead purchased by his father in 1856, his permanent 
home. He is a member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church and for 
forty years was leader of the choir in the Allegheny City church of that 
denomination. After his long, busy and useful life in the turmoil of the 
city, Mr. Allen enjoys his country home, and finds healthful occupation in 
managing its affairs. 

He married, in 1880, Kate B. Kenney, daughter of Lieutenant William 

Kenney, of Company B, Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 

who fell, mortally wounded, before Richmond. Children: i. Mary E., 
married Rev. E. L. McKnight, a minister of the Reformed Presbyterian 
Church, now located at Sharon, Iowa; children: John, Allen and Donald. 
2. John M. (2d), now living in Allegheny City, a coal dealer; married Mary 
Peck, of Syracuse, New York ; child, Eleanor Elizabeth. 3. Isabella. 4. 
Helen. 5. Margaret. The latter three are residing with their parents at 
the Ross township farm. 



The name of Edmundson is of English origin, and the 
EDMUNDSON family has been resident in the country many 
generations. 

Joseph E. Edmundson was born at McKeesport, Allegheny county, 
Pennsylvania, and was of the Quaker denomination. He married Mary 
Ann Baker, also born in McKeesport, and they had children : Caleb, who 
died in 191 1; John P., of further mention; Levi; Rebecca, deceased; 
Susan, deceased; Robert M. 

John F. Edmundson, son of Joseph E. and Mary Ann (Baker) Ed- 
mundson, was born August 22, 1835, in what was then Elizabeth township, 
since 1869 Lincoln township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and died 
January 14, 1914. After an elementary education acquired in the public 
schools, he attended the Conoquenessing Academy at Zelienople. and the 
Union College of Wilmington. Later he took up the study of law in the 
ofifice of Hon. Samuel A. Perviance and Titian A. Coffy. and was admitted 
to the bar in 1861. He was the second oldest practicing attorney in the city, 
having been engaged in active practice half a century. At the time of his 
death a meeting was called of the Allegheny County Bar Association to 
adopt resolutions of respect to the memory of this noted attorney, and among 
the eminent speakers on this occasion were : James W. Collins, L. K. Porter, 
J. A. Petty, George N. Monroe, W. H. Thomson and S. W. Woods. During 
th'e Civil War he was in active service for a short time. He was a Repub- 



834 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

lican in political opinion, and a member of the Methodist Church. At one 
time he was considered one of the wealthiest men of Pittsburgh. 

Mr. Edmundson married, in December, 1863, Phoebe, a daughter of 
John and Priscilla (Hall) Randolph, and a granddaughter of Joseph Hall. 
The Randolphs, from whom Airs. Edmundson is descended, are descendants 
of those Virginia Randolphs who settled Whitestown, Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania. They gave land for the founding of the present Princeton Uni- 
versity. A great-uncle of Mrs. Edmundson, John Randolph, went West, 
and a brother of his, WilHam Randolph, was a judge in St. Louis, Missouri, 
while another brother was a senator from one of the western states. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Edmundson: i. Carrie, who married (first) 
J. A. Herron, and had a daughter Caroline D., who married Vincent C. 
Cotton, has a child Dorothy, and is living on Rosedale street ; she married 
(second) Joseph Stadtfield, an attorney at the Allegheny county bar; they 
live at the corner of Whitman and Wilkins streets, and have children: 

Carita, Rogers, Joseph, Arnold. 2. Zella, married Burkhart, lives in 

Pittsburgh, and has children: Earl and Clyde. 3. Elvin, an attorney, lives 
in Pittsburgh ; married Caroline Schroth, has one child Carolina. 4. Ira, in 
the real estate business on Second avenue, Pittsburgh.; he married (first) 
Clara Cleeland, and has children : John, Lewis, Esther, Ira ; he married 
(second) Marian Muirhead, and has one child, William. 5. Rand M., who 
attended the Pittsburgh Academy, then studied law at the University of 
Michigan and at Yale University ; lives with his mother when in Pittsburgh. 
Mr. Edmundson had his summer home at Evergreen, Pennsylvania, while his 
city residence was on Elizabeth street. He was also the owner of other 
valuable property in the city, and the surrounding country. 



From Ireland in 1839 came Michael Rattigan, father of 
RATTIGAN John J. Rattigan, the well known business man of Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania. Michael Rattigan, born in 1821 in 
county Roscommon, Ireland, was the son of an Irish farmer, and one of a 
family of unusually large well-built men. His parents lived to be over eighty 
years of age, and were devout Catholics. Three of the sons, Michael, John 
and Martin, came to the LTnited States, John settling on a farm in Kent 
county, Michigan, Martin locating in the city of Baltimore. 

Michael Rattigan passed the first eighteen years of his life in Ireland, 
working on the farm, coming to New York City in 1839. He was large 
and strong for his years, and at once found work as a longshoreman, an 
occupation in which these qualities stood him in good part. He next secured 
work on the construction of the Erie canal, at a wage of seventy-five cents 
daily. In the meantime he had married and with his wife drifted westward, 
becoming a sub-contractor on sections of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in 
Maryland and Pennsylvania. In this capacity he built three miles of that 
road near Cumberland, Maryland, and five miles between Hineman and 
Bedford, Pennsylvania. He served three years in the Union army, during 





/ ^Ccctcr(^M..i^-. 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 835 

the Civil War, in a New York regiment, and finally permanently located 
in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. There he engaged in general contracting, 
and in 1872 built a large tube mill in McKeesport. He was always a lover 
of horses and in connection with his business owned many teams, as well 
as some good driving stock. He continued in business until shortly before 
his death, when he sold his horses and retired. He died in 1879. He was 
a man of generous build, was six feet tall, and did business on a large scale, 
employing many men and distributing a large amount of money each pay 
day. He was a devout Catholic, and faithful to all his obligations. He mar- 
ried Bridget Cufif, born in county Roscommon, Ireland, in 1822, died in 
Homestead, Pennsylvania, in 1901, daughter of Patrick and Bridget Cuff, 
who both lived and died in Ireland, near Sligo, he a farmer, reaching the 
age of ninety-four years, she dying at the age of eighty-nine years. Bridget 
Cuff, the daughter, came from Ireland alone when she was seventeen years 
of age, met Michael Rattigan in New York City, where they were married 
four years later, she then being twenty-one years of age. She had brothers 
and sisters : Mary, married John Nelson, and lived in Providence, Rhode 
Island ; John, who remained on the homestead in Ireland ; a sister who 
married a Gibbons, lived and died in Ireland, rearing a large family, some 
of whom came to the United States, one of them, Peter Gibbons, locating 
in Altoona, Pennsylvania ; Martin and Michael, both of whom located in 
McKeesport. In 1880, after the death of her husband, Mrs. Rattigan moved 
with her children to Homestead, Pennsylvania, where she resided until her 
death in 1901. She was a communicant of the Roman Catholic Church, 
reared her children most carefully in that faith, and was a true, faithful 
wife and mother. Children: i. Martin, lost at sea; he followed the sea 
from the time he was eleven years of age, and on his last voyage was 
steward of the ship "Ladonia" that was lost off the coast of Florida ; he 
was unmarried. 2. Mary, married John Gilluly, a steel worker, now re- 
siding in Homestead. 3. Michael (2), lost his arm by accident, later left 
home, and was never again heard from. 4. Bridget, married John Bonner, 
and lives in Cleveland, Ohio. 5. John Joseph, of whom further. 6. Nicholas, 
a steel worker, now residing in Cleveland, Ohio ; married Mary Manning. 
7. Kate, married John I. Kane, a steel worker, now residing in Homestead, 
Pennsylvania. 

John Joseph Rattigan, fifth child and third son of Michael and Bridget 
(Cuff) Rattigan, was born in Providence, Rhode Island. April 11, 1864, 
his father at that time being in the Union army. Not long after his birth 
the family moved to Pennsylvania, and finally to McKeesport, where he 
attended parochial schools. Later he was a student at the College of the 
Holy Ghost, continuing until 1882. The family had removed to Homestead 
in 1880, and after returning from college, John Joseph began work in the 
steel mills there. He continued a steel worker for fifteen years in Home- 
stead, then spent one year in Worcester, Massachusetts, mills. He returned 
to Pennsylvania at the end of that year, worked two years for the inde- 
pendent steel corporation, Jones & Laughlin, in Pittsburgh, then returned 



836 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

to Homestead. In 1893 he built a hotel at No. 344 Eighth avenue, Home- 
stead, operated it until 1895, then sold out and erected a building on the 
same avenue, in which he established a gentlemen's furnishing store. He 
continued there in a most prosperous business until April, 1913, when he 
disposed of his mercantile interests to become a brick manufacturer and 
coal operator at Freeport, Pennsylvania, under the corporate name of the 
Buffalo Creek Coal & Brick Company. He is manager and a member of the 
board of directors of that company, which transacts a large and profitable 
business in both its lines. Mr. Rattigan has always ranked high in his com- 
munity ; as a steel worker he was an expert, and the large wages he earned 
were rightly used and judiciously invested; as a business man he is progres- 
sive, energetic and well balanced, his good judgment and sound sense ever 
directing him rightly. He is one of the prosperous men of Homestead and 
has won his way to success by his own energy and ability. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, and has represented his ward in Homestead city council. 
He is an active, devout member of St. Mary Magdalene Roman Catholic 
Church, the Holy Name Society, and the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. The family home is at No. 310 Tenth avenue. Homestead, which 
Mr. Rattigan purchased. 

Mr. Rattigan married, in 1888, Margaret A. Good, born in Monongahela 
City, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph and Sarah C. Good, both deceased, 
he of American, she of English birth. Joseph Good was a well known coal 
operator. Children : Eileen, living at home ; John A., private secretary to a 
large ranch owner in Nevada ; Margaret, a high school student ; Josephine, 
Raymond, Frances. The latter three attend parochial schools. 



The ancestors of Dr. Albert T. Zeller, of McKeesport, Penn- 
ZELLER sylvania, came to the United States from Germany. Zeller is 

an ancient and honorable German family name and in Dr. Zel- 
ler's direct line, beginning with his grandfather. Rev. Magnus Frederick 
Zeller, eleven generations each produced a mininster of the gospel. Dr. Zel- 
ler's wife descends from the Trimble family of Scotland, a family noted 
more for its prowess in war. Her father. Colonel James Harvey Trimble, 
of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was a distinguished officer of the 
Union army, serving until the close of the Civil War. The Zellers were 
native to the Kingdom of Wurttemberg, Germany, and there Rev. Albert 
Zeller, father of Dr. Zeller. first saw the light, March 13, 1833, son of 
Rev. Magnus Frederick and Dorothea Frederika (Herwig) Zeller. Rev. 
Magnus Frederick Zeller was born in Wurttemberg, September 5. 1S03. 
died at Basilheim, Germany, October 8, 1843. He was a minister of the 
German Evangelical Church, eleven generations of his ancestors having also 
followed that holy calling. Wurttemberg, a kingdom in the southwestern 
part of Germany and the third state in size in the German Empire, has long 
been noted for the e.xxellence of its higher educational institutions and the 
general diffusion of public instruction. Amid such conditions Magnus 
Frederick Zeller grew to manhood, obtaining a superior education fitting him 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 837 

for the pursuit of liis high calling. He lived a life of great usefulness and 
in turn transmitted to his posterity the high qualities of mind, inherited by 
him from educated high-minded forbears. His wife, Dorothea (Herwigj 
Zeller, was born at Erlanger, Germany, April 25, t8oi, died July 14. 1843. 
Children : Johann, William, Sophie, Albert. 

(H) Rev. Albert Zeller, son of Rev. Magnus Frederick and Dorothea 
(Herwig) Zeller, was born in Wurttemberg, Germany, March 13. 1833. 
After a long and useful career as a minister of the gospel, he is residing 
near Buffalo, New York, with his eldest daughter. He was classically edu- 
cated in the superior institutions of his native Wurttemberg, then studied 
divinity at the University of Berne, Switzerland, and was regularly ordained 
a minister of the German Evangelical Church, a profession embraced by his 
forebears in succession from the sixteenth century. At the age of twenty- 
two years, in 1855, he came to the United States as a missionary to the 
German settlers in western Missouri. He quickly became known as a man 
of superior mind and education and not long after his coming was chosen 
general secretary of the German Evangelical Church of the United States. 
This position he ably filled for a quarter of a century, also filling many 
pulpits by invitation, also translating and publishing many books used in 
church and school. He then returned to regular pastoral work and served 
many important churches until after a continuously active ministerial life, 
covering a period of fifty-three years, he retired, full of honors gained in 
his Master's cause. He was in pastoral charge of churches in Cleveland, 
Buffalo and Rochester, New York, serving the latter church fifteen years 
with great acceptability. He possesses the gift of song and during his years 
in the ministry his deep bass voice led all others in congregational singing. 
Among his published works is a book of American patriotic and other songs, 
translated into German for use in the German schools. He also translated 
and published in English a book of German folk songs. His life has been 
very full and a blessing to his fellowmen. Now at the age of eighty-one 
years, the old veteran of the Cross is living a peaceful life near Buffalo, 
New York, at the farm of his son-in-law, John Webster, husband of his 
eldest child, Marie. 

Rev. Albert Zeller married Augusta Burk. born in Wurttemberg. Ger- 
many, July 6, 1833, died August 8, 1888, daughter of Rev. Christian Burk. 
a University graduate, minister of the Evangelical Church and editor of 
Der Christen Bote, a church paper devoted to the interests of the mis«ionary 
field. He was a man of brilliant mind and profound learning, influential in 
church and most useful in spreading the "glad tidings" of the gospel. He 
was thrice married, Augusta being a child of his first wife. Children of Rev. 
Albert and Augusta (Burk) Zeller: i. Marie, married John Webster, and 
resides on a farm near Buffalo. 2. Paul, a minister of the gospel, now 
serving the German Evangelical Church at Scranton, Pennsylvania. 3. 
Albert T.. of further mention. 4. Otto, a mechanic living in New York 
City; married Sadie Smith. 5. Martha, died at age of ten years. 

(HI) Dr. Albert T. Zeller, of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, second son of 



838 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. Albert and Augusta (Burk) Zeller, was born in Centerville, St. Clair 
county, Illinois, January 19, 1866. His early youth was spent in Illinois, 
where in his district the schools were poor and the fever and ague plenty, 
consequently his early education was confined to study at home, under the 
direction of his honored, scholarly father and mother. When nine years of 
age, his fatlier accepted a call to the Cleveland, Ohio, church, and in the 
public schools of that city and later in Buffalo, New York, he secured a 
good preparatory education. In Buffalo he also attended Elmhurst Academy. 
He began professional study in the College of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, and after graduation from that institution in 1887, entered 
the Medico-Chirurgical College in the same city, whence he was graduated 
M. D., class of 1889. He at once began medical practice in Rochester, New 
York, and continued there in practice until 1893, when he located in McKees- 
port, Pennsylvania, where he still continues in a well established successful 
practice, limited since 1907 to diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 
Dr. Zeller, in addition to his long years of experience in private practice, 
has added to his store of knowledge by post-graduate courses in noted in- 
stitutions, at home and abroad. In 1892-93 he did post-graduate work at 
the Medico-Chirurgical College, his alma mater. In 1903 he pursued a 
special course in Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital. New York City, and 
in 1906-07 studied in Vienna, Austria, specializing in diseases of the eye, 
ear, nose and throat. As a specialist in these diseases, Dr. Zeller has attained 
high rank and ministers to a very large clientele. During the fourteen years 
he devoted to general practice, he acquired prominence in his profession 
as a physician of skill and honor, a reputation that he fully maintains as a 
specialist. 

He is a prominent member of the Masonic Order, past master of AUi- 
quippa Lodge, No. 375, Free and Accepted Masons ; of McKeesport Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Sir Knight of McKeesport Commandery, No. 86, 
Knights Templar; and a "Shriner" of Syria Temple, Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, Pittsburgh. He also belongs to the Heptasophs National Union, 
German Beneficial Union, also several other societies, professional and 
social, and with his family communes with the congregation of the First 
Presbyterian Church. The family residence is at 15 18 Huey street, where 
Dr. Zeller erected a fine brick house in 1909. 

Dr. Zeller married, June 9, 1897, Harriet T. Trimble, born in Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Colonel James Harvey and Margaret (Stevens) 
Trimble, both deceased, and granddaughter of William and Sarah Trimble, 
of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, he a farmer occupying part of the 
tract on which his American ancestor settled about the year 1740. The 
Trimbles, originally Trumbull, came from Scotland, and according to tra- 
dition the first of the family to come to America consisted of a party of 
twenty Trumbull brothers and two sisters, one of whom married De Witt 
Clinton, of New York, the other married a Densmore. None of the brothers, 
it is said, weighed less than one hundred and eighty pounds and none were 
less than six feet in height. The founders of this branch settled in West- 



WESTrCRN PENNSYLVANIA 839 

moreland county, their land bordering the Kishimmitas river. W'ilHam and 
Sarah Trimble had issue: Colonel James Flarvey, see forward; Thomas, a 
"forty-niner," died in California in 1898; John, died on the old Westmore- 
land county homestead; Alice, never married; Caroline, married a Mr. 
Blair; Jane, married a Mr. Purvis, and lived in Iowa; Maria, married a 
Mr. McWhorter. 

Colonel James Harvey Trimble was born near Livermore, Salem town- 
ship, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 21, 1814, died June 9, 
1897. He grew to manhood at the home farm, married and on his wedding 
trip visited the state of Iowa. That country pleased him so well that he 
purchased a farm near Des Moines and there remained a few years. He 
then sold out and returned to the state of Pennsylvania, about the time 
of the outbreak of the Civil War. From a youth of eighteen he had been 
a member of the Pennsylvania militia, rising to the rank of major and 
ever being deeply interested in military affairs. At the outbreak of the 
war he aided in recruiting men in Westmoreland and began his own military 
career on August 11, 1861, when he enlisted and was chosen captain of 
Company C, Fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry. During his first 
three-year term of enlistment he participated in many battles, received 
slight wounds in several of them but did not sustain serious injury. He re- 
enlisted, September 16, 1864, and from that date until the end of the war 
was a regularly commissioned colonel of the Second Pennsylvania Regiment. 
Second Brigade, Fifth Division, Ninth Army Corps of the Army of the 
Potomac. As captain he led his men at the battles of Fort Donaldson, Pea 
Ridge, Hampton Roads, Newbern, Shiloh, Island No. 10, before Richmond, 
Antietam, Corinth, Prairie Grove, Fredericksburg, Murfreesboro, Chancel- 
lorsville, Port Gibson, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, Chickamauga. Brandy Station 
and Knoxville. As colonel of the Second Regiment he was engaged at the 
battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania. Resaca, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, 
Winchester and Appomattox, witnessing the final surrender of Lee's army. 
His career was a glorious one and he returned to civil life full of honors. 
After the war he located in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, where he operated a 
general store and engaged in other local enterprises. He there took an active 
interest in politics but ever refused office for himself, although ardent in 
his support of the Republican party and its candidates. In 1875 he retired 
from business, moved to McKeesport and there spent the remainder of his 
useful life. When a youth he joined the Salem Presbyterian Church and 
was ever a devoted member of that faith, as was his wife. 

Colonel Trimble married Margaret Stevenson, born near Latrobe, Penn- 
sylvania, December 28, 1835, died June 6, 1899, daughter of William 
Stevenson, a weaver of linen. After coming to America with his tliree 
youngest brothers, he established the first fulling mill west of the Allegheny 
Mountains, in western Pennsylvania. One of his brothers, Francis, became 
a hardware merchant of Pittsburgh, the other settled at Little Washington, 
Pennsylvania, Washington and Jeft'erson College being built on land he 
owned. A sister of these brothers married a 'Mr. McCreight and lived in 



840 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

the Ligonier Valley. William Stevenson continued linen manufacture until 
late in life, when he retired to a farm in Westmoreland county. 

Children of Colonel James Harvey and Margaret (Stevenson) Trimble: 
I. Isabella, married John Hutchinson, whom she survives, a resident of 
McKeesport. 2. Anna, deceased. 3. William S., superintendent of the 
Carnegie Steel Mills at East Pittsburgh ; resides in McKeesport. 4. Albert, 
a retired resident of McKeesport. 5. Eleanor, a resident of McKeesport. 6. 
Harvey, a resident of Port Vue, Pennsylvania. 7. Howard, a resident of 
McKeesport. 8. J. Noble, assistant cashier of the City Bank, McKeesport. 
9. Harriet T., wife of Dr. Albert T. Zeller, of previous mention. Children 
of Dr. and Mrs. Zeller: i. Cyril Theodore, born August 18, 1899, now a 
student at McKeesport High School. 2. Beatrice Trimble, born September 
14, 1901. 3. Albert Noble, born February 25, 1904, 



This is a good old English name, dating from a remote 
PIERCE period, and is widely distributed throughout the United States 
in its various form of spelling — Pierce, Pairce, Pearce — the 
original form of the name being Pers. There is every reason for believing 
that some of its bearers, if not all of them, derive their origin from the 
ancient Percy family of Northumberland, England, the Hotspurs of the 
North. Several genealogies have been written about the different American 
branches, but owing to the destruction of early records it is a matter of 
some difficulty to make exact connection in every case. 

(I) Lewis Pierce, the first of this branch of the Pierce family of whom 
we have record, was of English descent, and was a farmer near Mononga- 
hela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania. He was a member of the 
Methodist Church, and a man of considerable influence in the community 
in which he resided. 

(II) Amos Pierce, son of Lewis Pierce, was born on a farm near 
Monongahela City, Washington county, Pennsylvania, April 17, 1796, and 
died February 20, 1867. He was a farmer, and in 1840 built a fine brick 
house on the McKillip farm which had been inherited by his wife, and this 
house is still used as a residence. Later he bought ninety acres of adjoin- 
ing land, on Peter's creek, and on this he lived until his death. He was a 
very successful man in the treatment of cancerous diseases, and his patients 
came from far and near. In politics he was a strong Republican, and was 
a leading spirit in local public affairs. His religious allegiance was given 
to the United Presbyterian Church, and it was largely owing to his personal 
efforts that the Jefferson United Presbyterian Church was erected. He 
married Deborah McKillip, who was the only daughter of her parents who 
lived beyond infancy, and as her only brother, James, died in young man- 
hood, she was their sole heir. She was born December 8, 1790, and died 
April 12, 1875; she was reared strictly in the faith of the Covenanters, and 
later joined the United Presbyterian Church: 

(III) James M. Pierce, son of Amos and Deborah (McKillip) Pierce, 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 841 

was born in Jefiferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1840, 
and died in 1884. His early years were spent in his native township, but 
later he purchased a farm of one hundred and forty acres, in Lincoln town- 
ship, in the same county, where he resided until his death. He married 
(first) Mary Kadoo, born in Snowden township, Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1832, died in 1854 a daughter of Thomas Kadoo of English 
descent. He was a farmer and also ran a distillery, and when the temper- 
ance wave struck the country in the fifties, he converted his distillery into 
a grist mill, and operated this for many years. He was an elder and leader 
in the Presbyterian Church, and died at the age of eighty-five years, his 
wife dying at the age of eighty-four years. Mr. Pierce married (second) 
Sarah Boyd, now living at Boston, Pennsylvania. By the first marriage 
there were children : Mary Agnes, married Captain James Large, and lives 
at Duquesne Heights, Pennsylvania; Amos McKilHp, of further mention; 
Thomas J. Kadoo, lives on a farm in Jefferson township, married Elizabeth 
Stewart. Children by second marriage : John Boyd, lives on the farm 
in Lincoln township, married Martha Wilson; Louis, has a general and 
dairy farm in Lincoln township, married Martha Kerr; Martha D., a school 
teacher, lives with her mother. 

(IV) Amos McKillip Pierce, son of James M. and Mary (Kadoo) 
Pierce, was born in Watertown, Washington county, Ohio, September 23, 
1850. He was very young when he was taken to the farm of his grand- 
father in Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and there at- 
tended the district school, and later studied at Mount Union College. He 
then commenced reading medicine in the office of Dr. J. K. Van Kirk, and 
finally matriculated at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1876 with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. He at once commenced his medical practice at West Elizabeth, Penn- 
sylvania, wbcre he has now been located for a period of thirty-eight years, 
having won not alone the confidence of his numerous patients, but iheir 
sincere affection as well, for he is not alone a physician to them but also 
a sympathetic friend and a cheerful helper in all time of trouble. He is a 
Republican in political matters, and has served as a member of the council 
of West Elizabeth, and of the school board for tw^entv years, and has been 
president of the local board of health. He has acted as United States 
pension examiner. He and his wife are members of the United Presbyterian 
Church, in which he has been an elder for a quarter of a century. He is 
a member of the Allegheny County Medical Society, the American Medical 
Association and the McKeesport Academy of Medicine. In 1900 he erected 
a fine brick residence for himself in West Elizabeth. 

Dr. Pierce married, January 4, 1882, Mary Eleanor Heath, born in 
Jefferson township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1859, and 
they have one child : Glenn McKillip, bom June 10, 1886. He studied at 
Westminster College, from which he went to Harvard Medical College, 
from which he was graduated, and has now been in practice of his profession 



843 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

at McKeesport for the past four years. He married Blanche E. Heslyn, and 
has one child, Doris, born October 25, 1913. 

Samuel Heath, grandfather of Mrs. Pierce, was of Scotch-Irish descent, 
and his early years were spent in the state of New Jersey. He was a soldier 
in the Continental army during the War of the Revolution, and after his 
marriage at an early age, he went west to Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, 
where he took up a large tract of land in Jefferson township. He was a 
Baptist in religious faith. He married Elizabeth Lichens. 

Henry Heath, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Lichens) Heath, was born 
in Jefferson township, in November, 1809, ^^^ died November 24, 1876. 
He inherited his father's farm of two hundred and fifty acres, and spent 
his entire life there. He was a strong supporter of the Republican party, 
and was known as Squire Heath. He and his wife were Presbyterians. He 
married (first) Sarah Ann Parkinson, born in Washington county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1827, died June 4, 1859, a daughter of Washington and Sarah 
Ann (Kinney) Parkinson, early settlers in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was a wealthy farmer. He also had the contract of haul- 
ing between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, making this laborious trip over 
the mountains. Mr. Heath married (second) in 1871, Susan Cochran. 
Children, all of the first marriage: Sarah, died at the age of three years; 
Elizabeth, died at the age of one and a half years ; William Henry, lived in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, on a farm, and died in 1894; Mary 
Eleanor, who married Dr. Pierce, as above mentioned. 



Ireland has furnished to this country a great number of 
KINLOUGH our most patriotic and public-spirited citizens, men who 

have been willing to sacrifice their lives if necessary for 
the preservation of the Union, and numbered among this vast number was 
the late Martin Kinlough, who was a resident of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, 
for twelve years, active in community affairs, esteemed and honored by 
all who knew him. 

Michael Kinlough, father of Martin Kinlough, was a native of Ireland, 
there spent his life and there died in the year 1846. After his death his 
widow, Sarah (Murphy) Kinlough, accompanied her son, Martin, to Birm- 
ingham, England, and there resided until her death in the year 1879. She 
was the mother of three other children, namely : Patrick, William, Sallie, 
died in infancy. 

Martin Kinlough was born in county Mayo, Ireland, September 27, 
1832, died in McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 24, 
1889. He was reared and educated in his native land, after which he served 
an apprenticeship at the blacksmith trade, becoming a thorough and prac- 
tical workman. At the age of fourteen years, when deprived by death of 
his father, he went to Birmingham, England, as aforementioned, and there 
worked at his trade for twenty years, assuming the responsibility of looking 
after his mother and brothers, quite a hard task for one of tender years, but 
it served to strengthen his character and make him thoughtful as nothing 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 845 

else would have done. Later he emigrated to the L'nited States, locating 
in Pittsburgli, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a blacksmith helper for a 
number of years, then removed to St. Louis, Missouri, where he remained 
for about five years, then returned to Pittsburgh, and about the year 1877 
took up his residence in McKeesport, there spending the remainrler of his 
days. Pie worked in a number of places, and traveled considerably, thus 
adding greatly to his knowledge of men and affairs. He was successful in 
his business, accumulating considerable capital which he wisely investefl in 
real estate, and at the time of his death was the owner of considerable 
property in McKeesport. He was a communicant of the Catholic Church, 
and a Democrat in politics. He married, in England, Mary Coan, born in 
county Mayo, Ireland, 1840, died in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, October 24, 
19 1 3, they having been early sweethearts, growing up together, and being 
greatly devoted to each other throughout their entire lives. They were the 
parents of nine children, three of whom died in infancy, the others being as 
follows: I. Mollie, wife of Thomas Wood, of Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 
2. Michael, a resident of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 3. Catharine J., who 
now owns the homestead of her parents located at No. 718 Ridge street, 
McKeesport; she devoted her life to the care of her parents, being ever 
thoughtful of their comfort and welfare; she is a great reader, being well 
versed in history, and she expects in the near future to augment this 
knowledge by travel, anticipating a visit to Birmingham, England, her birth- 
place, also to Ireland where her parents were born ; her father was four- 
teen years of age at the time of the great famine in Ireland, when so many 
people died of starvation in the streets, other countries furnishing meal 
which was only fit to be fed to cattle. 4. Ellen, widow of Samuel Walker, 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 5. John, a resident of McKeesport, Penn- 
sylvania. 6. William, a resident of McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 



William Galway is a member of an Irish family, and him- 
GALWAY self a native of Ireland, representative of the best type of 
his countrymen, who have contributed so desirable an ele- 
ment to the complex fabric of American citizenship. His father was also 
William Galway, a native of county Antrim, Ireland, who passed his entire 
life in that picturesque and romantic region of a picturesque and romantic 
country. He was married to Johanah McMeekim, a native of county 
Antrim, Ireland, who with her husband lived and died in her native land. 

William Galway, son of William and Johanah (McMeekim) Galway, 
was born December 23, 1847, in county Antrim, Ireland, and passed his 
childhood and young manhood there, receiving his education in the schools 
of his native region. His youth happened upon a very stormy period in 
Ireland's history. When he was about ten years old the famous Fenian 
brotherhood was founded in America among a group of Irishmen in this 
country, having at heart the independence of Ireland. The membership of 
the society rapidly grew and by the time Mr. Galway was approaching man- 
hood, it had spread largely over the two countries. America and Ireland. 



844 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

In 1867, when he was twenty years of age, occurred the great Fenian rising, 
in which he participated, coming into contact with the romantic figure of 
O'Donovan Rosa. This strange personaUty was of the well known family 
of the O'Donovans of Rosa, but the name of his district clung to him and 
he was always popularly known by its appellation. O'Donovan Rosa was 
the first home rule candidate for the British parliament and the campaign 
and his eventual election were the occasion of violence and rioting of every 
description. Mr. Galway was present at these scenes and took part in the 
disturbances. Rosa was ousted from parliament on the grounds that his 
election had been brought about by unfair and violent means, and he served 
a term of imprisonment in an English prison and was under sentence of 
death. The latter sentence was commuted by Queen Victoria on condition 
that he leave the British Isles forever. The condition was accepted and 
Rosa came to the United States, where he passed the remainder of his life. 
In 1873 Mr. Galway came to America, and made his home in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. His first employment set him to work on the Keystone 
Bridge, but he soon secured a position on the Pittsburgh police force, first 
as a patrolman and later as lieutenant. He then left this service and found 
work as a conductor on a street car. After spending upwards of nineteen 
years in Pittsburgh, Mr. Galway removed to Aspinwall, Pennsylvania, and 
there entered the police force of the town. He served for a time as patrol 
man and was then promoted to be chief of police for the town. Still later 
he was ofifered and accepted the post which he now fills, that of chief of the 
police force of the great steel works of the Spang and Chalfant Company at 
Etna, Pennsylvania. He entered into the duties of his new office in 1912. 
Mr. Galway's character fit him well for the performance of the duties of 
his post, which is no sinecure. His character is naturally courageous, and 
he is descended from a long line of Scotch-Irish ancestry which has tlirough 
long years become accustomed to facing danger. His uncle, Samuel Galway, 
was a sergeant in the Royal Artillery and was killed at Alma. 

Mr. Galway married, in 1873, Nora Lyons. Mr. and Mrs. Galway are 
the parents of six children, as follows: William A., Samuel R.. J. M., 
Calvin Knox, Clififord, Harold L. Mr. Galway was reared in the United 
Presbyterian Church, and is still an ardent member, training his children 
in the same belief. 



Edward L. Sutton, M. D., is a member of an old Pennsyl- 
SUTTON vania family, being descended on both sides of the house 

from old residents of the state, men who were pioneers in the 
region west of the great Appalachian highlands. His paternal grandfather 
was John Sutton, a native of Butler county in the days when it was but 
sparsely settled, but passing his entire life there and rearing his children. 
One of his sons, Jacob Sutton, the father of Dr. Edward L. Sutton, was 
born in that region in the year 1852 and passed his childhood there, being 
educated in the local public schools. He became a mechanical engineer and 
removed to McKeesport, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and later to the 





^^4AjU/yJ' 



WESTERN I'EWSYLVAXJA 845 

city of Alleglieny, where he followed his profession and eventually died. 
His death occurred in the year 191 1, and his widow is still living in their 
home in Allegheny. In politics Mr. Sutton was a Republican, and keenly 
interested in all questions, whether of general or local bearing. He and 
Mrs. Sutton were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and attended 
the Old Manchester Church standing on Market street, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mr. Sutton married, December 24, 1861, Susanah Montgomery, a 
native of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, where she was born January 13, 1842. 
Mrs. Sutton was a daughter of John and Mary Montgomery, early settlers 
of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, where both eventually died. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Sutton there were born ten children in all, of which, however, 
five died in infancy or early childhood. The five who attained maturity 
were as follows: Harry; Clemence ; Wisley, deceased 1910; Edward L., 
of whom further; Mary Montgomery. 

Dr. Edward L. Sutton, son of Jacob B. and Susanah (Montgomery) 
Sutton, was born September 27, 1878, in the "North Side" of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. He passed his childhood in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, and 
there received the elementary portion of his education, attending both the 
local public schools and the Park Institute Night School, also had private 
tutoring. At the age of twelve and a half years he was compelled to leave 
school and secured a position in a real estate office where he remained for 
one year, at which time he began as office boy at Carnegie Steel Company, 
during the famous Homestead strike. With strict application and perse- 
verance he worked his way into various positions, until he became order 
clerk, at the same time studying at night in preparation for school. Becom- 
ing restless, feeling that he had not met his life work, he left for college in 
the year 1898, attending Allegheny College, Meadville, two years. During 
the time that he was pursuing his general studies in these institutions, he 
determined to devote his time to the study of a profession, and decided 
upon medicine. He accordingly matriculated in the Jefiferson Medical Col- 
lege, of Philadelphia, and there remained during three and a half years 
taking the prescribed courses. He then went to the University of Maryland, 
and finished his technical training there, graduating with the class of 1905. 
from the medical department of that institution. The year following his 
graduation, he went to Bellevue, Pennsylvania, where he has ever since lived, 
and here at once established himself in the general practice of his profession. 
This practice, successful from the first, has continued ever since to grow, 
until now it is both large and lucrative. Dr. Sutton is a member of the 
Allegheny County and Ohio Valley Medical societies. Besides his profes- 
sional duties and interests, onerous as these are, Dr. Sutton finds time to 
identify himself with the life of the community in other aspects. He is a 
member of Bellevue Lodge, No. 530. Free and Accepted Masons ; Bellevue 
Chapter, No. 287, Royal Arch 'Masons; Allegheny Commandery. No. 35. 
Knights Templar; Royal Arcanum and the Modern Woodmen of America. 
In politics Dr. Sutton is a Republican, and he takes a keen interest in all 
questions whether of a local or more general application. 



846 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Dr. Sutton married, April 9, 1907, Catherine Louise Alussler, a native 
of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, born September 13, 1S83. Mrs. Sutton is a 
daughter of Louis K. and Katherine (Keisch) Mussler, of Allegheny, Penn- 
sylvania. To Dr. and Mrs. Sutton has been born one child, a son, Robert 
Lexington, July 25, 1909. Dr. and Mrs. Sutton are members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, and are rearing their son in that persuasion. 

Dr. Sutton stands in the first rank of his profession in Bellevue and 
the surrounding district, and besides his personal practice holds honorable 
and important posts. He is on the staff of the Suburban General Hospital, 
and assistant staff" member of the Presbyterian Hospital of the "North Side," 
Pittsburgh. 



Many of the residents of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, claim 

FRITCHIE Germany as their birthplace, and among this vast number 

must be mentioned Charles E. Fritchie, born in Germany, 

November 5, 1838, son of Godfried and Wilhelmina (Fiedler) Fritchie, 

both of whom were born, lived and died in Germany. 

Charles E. Fritchie received an excellent education in the schools of 
his native land, and he remained there until the year 1865 when he came 
to this country, locating in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, securing employ- 
ment with the Pennsylvania Railroad, with which corporation he remained 
until 1870, and then embarked in the hotel business, which line of work he 
successfully followed for twenty-eight years. For the past eight years he 
has lived retired from active pursuits, residing at No. 510 Flagler street. 
He is a self-made man in the truest sense of the word, having no capital 
when he took up his residence in McKeesport, neither influential friends 
to assist him, and at the present time (1914) is the owner of the attractive 
house in which he resides, six dwelling houses in the borough of Liberty, 
also eighty lots, which are constantly increasing in value. The success 
which attended his efforts is solely the result of hard and unremitting toil 
and a steadfast determination to win the goal he desired. His only regret 
is that he was not in this country in time to actively participate in the 
struggle for the abolition of slavery. He is a stockholder in the City and 
National banks of McKeesport. He is a member of the German Protestant 
Church, located on Walnut street, McKeesport, and an Independent in 
politics, not being hampered in the casting of his vote by party affiliation. 

Mr. Fritchie married, in East Pittsburgh (then Braddock), Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1868, Louise Zuber, a native of Germany, coming to this country 
from Heidelberg. They were the parents of seven children, three of whom 
died in infancy, and the others being as follows: Edward, deceased; Frank, 
deceased ; Albert, resides in ^^^estmoreland county, Pennsylvania, married 
Minnie Klein and has two children : Harold and T^uise, and an adopted 
child, Erna ; Lisetta, at home. The deaths of Edward and Frank, who had 
both attained years of manhood, although unmarried, was a severe blow 
to their parents ; they were both devoted to their parents, were great lovers 
of good literature, well read on many topics, especially in current events. 



W E ST L^ R N 1 ' 1 •: X X S Y L \ ' A X 1 A 847 

Mr. Fritchie, although well advanced in years, takes an active interest in 
all that pertains to the welfare of the community, and is held in high esteem 
by a wide circle of friends. 



James Ray Todd was one of the early settlers of 
TODD AND CRICK Beaver county, Pennsylvania. In his early years 
he was a tanner by trade and lived in Rochester, 
Beaver county, but he later became a farmer, and continued in this occupa- 
tion until the year of his death, 1907. He was a Republican in politics, a 
man who took an alert interest in the questions of the day, especially in the 
conduct of local affairs. He and his family were members of the United 
Presbyterian Church. He married Margerette E. Campbell, a native of 
Raccoon township, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, daughter of William and 
Phoebe (Mercer) Campbell, also early settlers in that region. Mr. Camp- 
bell met with an accident which caused his death, but was survived by his 
widow until the year 1892, when she died at the advanced age of ninety- 
two, her birth having taken place in the year 1800. Mr. Todd's marriage 
to Miss Campbell was celebrated in Raccoon township, and to them were 
born five children, as follows: Wilhelmina, deceased; William Campbell; 
Addison; Harry B., of whom forward; Lula. Mr. Todd's death occurred in 
the year 1907 and he is survived by Mrs. Todd, now a resident of Chester, 
West Virginia. 

Harry B. Todd, the fourth child of James Ray and Margerette E. 
(Campbell) Todd, was born November 17, 1878, in Raccoon township, 
Beaver county. Pennsylvania. His childhood was spent on his father's 
farm, and his education was obtained at the local public schools. Upon 
completing his studies there, he learned the trade of tinner, going to Alle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania, for that purpose. He remained in that city for three 
years, and in 1907, the year of his father's death, he removed to Avalon, 
Pennsylvania, and secured a position with O. P. Springer, with whom he 
was employed for a term of three and a half years. At the end of this 
time Mr. Todd decided vipon embarking upon a venture of his own, and 
accordingly withdrew from his association with Mr. Springer and estab- 
lished a business in roofing and furnace work on his own account. He took 
into partnership with him Mr. John A. Crick, a sketch of whose family 
appears in connection with the present article, the name of the firm being 
now H. B. Todd & Company. The enterprise was successful from the 
start, and the concern is now doing a large and flourishing business. Be- 
sides his activity in the mercantile world, Mr. Todd plays a prominent 
part in the life of the community generally, and is identified with its 
interests in many ways. In politics he is a Republican, taking a keen and 
intelligent interest in questions both of general and local import. He is a 
member of the Order of Independent Americans. 

Mr. Todd married, December 9. 1904. Lottie Hall, a native of Roane 
county. West Virginia, daughter of Perr\' Hall. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Todd 
have been born four children, as follows : A'irginia. Wilbert. Edith. ]\Iarylee, 



848 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

all of whom are living. In the year 1908 Mr. Todd built a handsome resi- 
dence for himself and family at No. 751 Semple avenue, Avalon, Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. and Mrs. Todd are members of the Lutheran Church, and in 
this belief are rearing their children. 

John A. Crick, a partner of Harry B. Todd, in the firm of H. B. Todd 
& Company, is a member of one of the old pioneer families of Western 
Pennsylvania. His paternal great-grandfather was Jacob Crick, a native of 
Germany, who in the early days of immigration arrived in this country from 
his native land, and settled in Clarion county, Pennsylvania. To him and 
his wife, Rachel Crick, were born eight children, as follows : John, David, 
Daniel, Henry, Susan, Betsey, Lewis, Christin. The seventh of these 
children, Lewis Crick, was educated in the Clarion county public 
schools, and later learned the carpenter's trade. He lived all his 
life in Clarion county, and there plied his trade. His death occurred 
when he was but thirty-seven years of age. He was a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, and in politics a Republican. He married Nancy 
Wilson, whose parents were pioneers of Clarion county, Pennsylvania. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Crick were born seven children, as follows : Clara, 
deceased; Sarah; Mary; Robert C, of whom forward; David, deceased; 
Bell, deceased ; Bird. 

Robert C. Crick, fourth child of Lewis and Nancy (Wilson) Crick, 
and father of the present Mr. Crick, was born August 3, i860, at Rimers- 
burg, Clarion county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the schools of his 
native place, and following in his father's footsteps, he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade. He did not persevere in this occupation, but engaged in the oil 
business, remaining in the Bradford oil fields for six years, and then in the 
Washington county oil fields seven years longer. In 1897 he came to Avalon, 
Pennsylvania, and in the same year built for himself a handsome house. 
Mr. Crick is a member of the Republican party and an active man in politics, 
having served his fellow citizens in the capacity of a member of the police 
force and as a member of the street commission, the former for five and the 
latter for eight years. Mr. Crick is also active in the social and fraternal life 
of the town, being a member of the Order of Independent Americans, and of 
the Knights of the Maccabees. His membership in the latter organization 
has continued for twenty-five years. Mr. Crick is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. 

Mr. Crick married, December, 1883, Margaret Aminda Culbertson. a 
native of Clarion county, Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Crick 
have been born three children, as follows : Clara, now Mrs. George Morland ; 
Frances, now Mrs. William Scott and the mother of one son, Robert Wesley 
Scott; John A., of whom forward. 

John A. Crick, the third and youngest child of Robert C. and Margaret 
Aminda (Culbertson) Crick, was. born July 25, 1891, in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and passed his childhood in the oil fields of that region. While 
he was still young, however, his parents removed to Avalon, their present 
home, and took him with them, and it was here that he received his education 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 849 

in the local public schools. After the completion of his studies, he entered 
into partnership with Mr. Harry I*. Todd, and with him formed the firm 
of H. B. Todd & Company, engaged in roofing and furnace work. The firm 
is most successful. Mr. Crick has been reared in the Presbyterian Church. 
He is very active in the life of his town, and takes a prominent part in 
politics there as a member of the Republican party. He is also a member of 
the Order of Independent Americans. Mr. Crick is unmarried. 



Frank (P'ranz) Amrhein was born in P>avaria, Germany, 
AMRHEIN and was in his early youth when he emigrated to this coun- 
try. He settled in Lower St. Clair township, and his first 
employment was as a mine worker. He had learned the plasterer's trade in 
Germany, and from that drifted into the glass business. Finally he pur- 
chased a small garden, and followed gardening as an occupation until his 
death. He was independent in political opinion, and he and his wife were 
members of St. Michael's Church, but later became charter members of 
St. Joseph's Church, which was organized in St. Clair borough, and retained 
their membership in this church until it was cut ofif by death. They also 
belonged to several church societies, and were active in their interests. Mr. 
Amrhein married Barbara Hirsh, who also came to America in her youth, 
and they had children : Father Joseph, first consulter of the Passionist 
Order in Rome; Elizabeth, died in infancy; Francis A., of further mention; 
Jacob, born in March, 1863, died at the age of eighteen years: Andrew, of 
further mention. 

Francis A. Amrhein, son of Frank and Barbara (Hirsh) Amrhein, was 
born May 4, 1861. He was educated in St. Joseph's Parochial School. Upon 
leaving this he obtained employment in the glass works, and then entered 
the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, remaining for a period 
of ten years, being employed to assist in handling the mail. In 1896, in 
partnership with his brother, Andrew, he established himself in the wagon 
building business at No. 2215 Jane street, South Side, Pittsburgh, and has 
been identified with this industry since that time. They started the business 
in a modest way, in a shop only twenty by forty feet, increased this to 
eighty feet, and later to one hundred and twenty feet. Still later they added 
another story to their building, and used this addition for a paint shop. 
They have an average of seven men in their employ, but it is frequently 
necessary to increase this working force. Their wagons are shipped all over 
the western part of the state of Pennsylvania. Their wagon repair shop is 
conducted on a proportionate scale. He is a Republican politically, and 
has served four years as treasurer of tlie borough. He lives in a beautiful 
house at No. 128 Clover street, St. Clair borough. He and his brother 
Andrew were among the organizers and charter members of St. Henry's 
Church, and had it not been for their activities it is doubtful whether the 
church would have been successfully organized. At one time they assumed 
a large financial risk, but by their excellent management the undertaking 
prospered and it is now a parish in excellent standing. For many years he 



850 WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

has been a member of the CathoHc Mutual Benefit Association, and has 
served as its financial secretary, and he is a member of the Knights of St. 
George. Mr. Amrhein married, September 18, 1886, Mary Louise Seubert, 
bom in Allegheny, a daughter of Sebastian and Mary Seubert, both deceased. 
Children : Gertrude Barbara, Hilda, who died at the age of fourteen 
months ; Mary Louisa, George, Francis. 

Andrew Amrhein, son of Frank and Barbara (Hirsh) Amrhein, was 
born in Lower St. Clair township, now St. Clair borough, December 4, 1865. 
He acquired his education at St. Joseph's Parochial School, and upon leaving 
this was apprenticed to learn the trade of wagon building and blacksmithing. 
This apprenticeship was passed on Eighth street. He then worked at his 
trade elsewhere for five and a half years, and then associated himself in 
business with his brother Francis A., as mentioned in the preceding para- 
graph. He is a Republican in politics, and has served one term of four 
years in the St. Clair borough council. He is president of Branch No. 211, 
Catholic Mutual Benefit Association ; a member of the Knights of St. George, 
the Order of Moose, and a Benefit Society. Mr, Amrhein married, in 1891, 
Catherine Kirsch, born in Lower St. Clair township, a daughter of Jacob 
and Margaret Kirsch, very early residents of the township. Children : 
Frank Joseph, in business with his father, is financial secretary of Branch 
No. 211, Catholic Mutual Benefit Association; Hilda Anna, died at the age 
of twenty months ; Mary Louisa, Joseph Frank, Andrew John, Jacob Adam, 
Catherine Mary, Margaret Susanna, Aloysius Peter, William Anthony. 



Michigan was the birthplace of Fred L. Fast, but Ohio was 
FAST formerly the home of the family. In Jefferson county. Ohio, 
Benjamin F. Fast was born, and was educated for the ministry 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Mount Union College, graduating from 
that institution a member of the second class to receive diplomas. He was 
active in the ministry for but a short time. He then entered business life 
as a merchant in Michigan, later returned to Ohio and there engaged in 
mercantile dealings until his death. Successful in business, he won respect 
and regard from those with whom he associated, and lived a life active and 
useful, his every relation to his fellows upright and honorable. 

Benjamin F. Fast married Nancy E. Filson, born in Jefferson county, 
Ohio, daughter of Robert and Caroline (Gillespie) Filson, of Stark county, 
Ohio, her mother a daughter of James Blaine Gillespie, a relative of James 
G. Blaine, the well-known statesman. Children of Benjamin F. and Nancy 
E. (Filson) Fast: t. Frank R., of Mansfield, Ohio. 2. Fred L., of whom 
further. 3. Hallie M., married a Mr. Cowan, and lives in Butler, Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Harry G., of Ben Avon, Pennsylvania. 5. Josephine A., of 
Emsworth, Pennsylvania. 

Fred L. Fast, son of Benjamin F. and Nancy E. (Filson) Fast, was 
born in Michigan, and was educated in the public schools of Alliance, Ohio. 
His studies at an end, he became a clerk in the employ of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, at Alliance, and was afterward transferred to the company's 



WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 85.1 

offices in Pittsburgh, in the engineering department. Jn 1905 Mr. Fast 
resigned from the railroad service, and estabhshed in independent business 
as a stock and bond broker, having resided in Glenosborne, Pennsylvania, 
since 1904. The securities that he has handled have been of a uniformly 
high standard, and through reliable service and straightforward transactions 
he has vi^on and holds the trust and confidence of a large patronage. Mr. 
Fast is well-known in fraternal circles, belonging to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and to lodge, chapter, and council of the Masonic Order. 
He is identified with the Republican party, and has participated in local 
politics. He married, in February, 1892, Ada M. Bevington, and is the 
father of John F. and Fred L. Jr. 



General Alexander Hays was born at Franklin, Venango 
HAYS county, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1819. He was the fifth child and 
the fourth son of Samuel and Agnes (Broadfoot) Hays. This 
worthy couple had six children, viz. : Eleanor, John Broadfoot, David 
Brown, Samuel B., Alexander (the subject of this memoir), and James P. 
Mrs. Agnes Hays, the mother of these children, died in November, 1839. 
Samuel Hays, the father, died at his home in Franklin, July 6, 1868, in 
his eighty-fifth year. Samuel Hays, known in his home' community as 
General Hays from his commission and service as such in the early Penn- 
sylvania militia, was a man of high standing. Born in county Donegal, 
Ireland, September 10, 1783; at the age of seven, with his mother, Mrs. 
Eleanor Hays, he emigrated to the United States and located in Venango 
county, Pennsylvania, then an almost unbroken forest just opening to settle- 
ment. Eleanor Hays died in 1822. General Samuel Hays served as treas- 
urer and sherifif of Venango county and in both branches of the general 
assembly of Pennsylvania, and was elected to the twenty-eighth congress 
of the United States, entering that body in 1843.. He later served as United 
States marshal for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and was associate 
judge of Venango county, and all these positions he filled with honor and 
integrity. 

On his maternal side Alexander Hays was of Scotch lineage, the 
Broadfoot family having come to Pennsylvania early in the last century, 
and they, too, found a home in its northwestern corner. The family name 
is chiefly known and localized in Wigtonshire, though frequently met with 
in other parts of Scotland. The Broadfoots were a numerous family that 
came from a distinguished Scotch ancestry, of which they were very proud. 

Alexander Hays received a common school education in his native 
town, and later entered Allegheny College at Meadville. Subsequently 
he received an appointment as cadet in the Military Academy at West Point. 
where he graduated in 1844, and where he had been the fellow student of 
U. S. Grant and Winfield S. Hancock. Immediately on leaving ^^'est Point 
he was assigned to duty, with the brevet of second lieutenant, in the Fourth 
Infantry, to which U. S. Grant also belonged. The Mexican war breaking